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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is driving me slightly mad!

New bike, started riding it and seem to get lower back pain. Any tips on how to sort it out. I purchased it mail order so can't send it back. But before I did I measured the
length from a previous bike that did not cause back pain which was 1/2 " too small (when I rode it I would alway push my butt just off the saddle).

So the kona should fit, it's just trying to find the magic combination. I am 6"1' and the frame is the 18" version.

There is a difference of 1/2" between the kona and the good fit bike. The kona is 1/2" bigger. the other differences are the stem is a bit shorter by 10" on the kona and maybe there is more of a rise in the bars? The forks are the same so I can get the stem to bolt on at the same height.

Advice please!

Thanks in advance!
 

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Ahhh... Lower Back

Well, only really a couple of things that cause this, but one is more predominate than the others. Your angle in the saddle is too low. What this means is either your handlebars are too low and you're bending too much or the bike is too big for you and you are stretching. Either way, this is not good. Take it to a bike shop and have them go over your geometry with you. You may have some adjustments they can make that will take the strain off your lower back. Good luck!!
 

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Other options...

You might also set a mirror out and have someone hold you up on your bike. You want about a 90 degree angle from your arms to your body when you are sitting down. Under is ok, but over causes strains. Your handlebars might also be too far out. A shorter neck and increased elevation can usually fix this if you are reaching too far. Check your seat, neck and handlebars. Hopefully this can get the pain out of riding. Good luck and let us know how it goes.
 

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Rampage said:
Your angle in the saddle is too low. What this means is either your handlebars are too low and you're bending too much or the bike is too big for you and you are stretching.
????????? The angle of your sadle is too low so the handle bars are too low ???????? Don't quite understand this statement. Maybe you sadle is to low and your handle bars are too high, but in general high hadnle bars do not cause back pain.

From your discription it sounds as if you handle bars are higher than your previous bike which shouldn't cause back pain. If you still have you old bike I would try taking all measurements from it and setting up your new bike to these and see if it helps - this will at leats give you a starting point from which you shouldn't be feeling any pain and then go from there.

Do you know how to set up sadle height properly and how to check sadle position?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok, I think I sorted it.

I have heightened the saddle a bit as I felt that I was getting tired too easily on this bike. I also fitted a slightly longer stem. Tilted the bars towars me a bit and shifted the saddle forwards a little.

then had a look in the mirror and noticed that my posture was really bad ie back
arched away from bike. So I also straightened my bike whilst riding and this solved the problem. Plus the longer stem has calmed down the steering and the higher saddle means I can climb again!

Cheers for all the advice, it seems that it was a mixture of poor setup and bad posture! :cool:
 

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Good to hear...

Using a mirror is probably the best thing a rider can use when setting up a bike, as you actually can see how you sit. As far as the seat adjustment I was talking about, there are three types of adjustments a seat needs to be adjusted for: elevation, pitch and centering. Elevation is how high the seat is above the ground and pitch is angle at which the nose/tail of the seat are in. The nose is the smaller part that is in front and the tail is in the rear. You can adjust the angle on this to fit your comfort. Many people prefer the nose to be higher than the tail, some prefer something else. It's totally a you thing, whatever feels comfy. The last is centering, this is where you move the seat forward or back until you feel your body weight is centered over the bike. This works with neck and bike length to determine proper posture. It's all about what feels comfy for you. Enjoy!
 

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my back doesnt hurt, but my neck certainly hurts not really bad but a little bit of discomfort.

what causes that? ive only been ridding(besides when i was younger) for a few weeks 3 or 4 times a week, does it just take getting used to again?
 

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primussucks said:
my back doesnt hurt, but my neck certainly hurts not really bad but a little bit of discomfort.

what causes that? ive only been ridding(besides when i was younger) for a few weeks 3 or 4 times a week, does it just take getting used to again?
It normally means that either your handl bars are to low or to far forward pulling you to low and making you "crane" your neck past what is comfortable. I had to set my HB back to where they were 'cause of this same problem when I lowered them by reversing the stem.
 

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My neck pain disappeared the minute I got rid of my helmet visor. I found myself lifting my head up too far to see far enough down the trail.
 

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richeyr said:
My neck pain disappeared the minute I got rid of my helmet visor. I found myself lifting my head up too far to see far enough down the trail.
Yeh that could help too, it's why my neck ached cause I have to look up a bit higher to see past the peak. Still I wouldn't take the peak off for general riding since I use it all the time to help shield my eyes from the sun, rain and on a night to help block out car lights. Might consider it for racing and lower the HB back down for a more areo position.
 

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Definitely leaning too far..

You might need to move your seat forward and get a smaller neck length. You can pick up Thompson and Bontrager necks really cheap. Another option is to lift your neck by adding spacers. But, depending on how much pipe you have left on your fork, you may or may not be able to go up very much. Take the bike to a shop and have them walk you through some options. There is no fun in riding if you hurt, especially your neck and lower back. Good luck!!
 
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