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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey men,

I like to hit the big lines and the gnar on my enduro bike. But at the same time i want my bike as light as possible to be able to pedal it for hours.

My question is what parts are you using that is both light and strong!

Given in the triangel of light/strong/cheap you can only pick two i expect these components to be expensive.

None the less i want to know what the strongest lightest parts are that have held the test of time.


I'll start off with Renthal carbon 35mm fatbar and stem. Super light and has taken 2 really really hard nose in crashes (one that broke my frame) and the bar/stem combo is still going strong.


Weirdly cheap ebay flat pedals. Ultimately the cage is not that strong, but they are light and last a year or so. So.... given that pedals are damaged easily with rock strike etc the cheap ebay pedal does a good job and is light. Bend one up. get another set for $20 with free shipping. The pedals i am on now are 1.5 years old and going strong.
 

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... i want my bike as light as possible to be able to pedal it for hours. ....
Light as possible is good, but you can pedal a heavy bike for the same amount of time as a light bike. You'll just climb slower and cover less distance. If you want a light bike, it's to climb and cruise faster, not ride for longer. Look at it this way. If you have a particular route in mind, you'll spend less timer riding it and get done soone on a faster bike.
 

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Weight isn't the deciding factor for me when I want a burly bike that I can pedal all day. Gearing is what makes the difference.
I put the parts I like and trust on the bike and typically ride double down/DH type tires.
The same bikes I ride all day at the bike park are the same bikes I ride all day on pedaly trails- XL Hightower and XL Nomad 3.
Hightower weighs about 33lbs and N3 weighs about 34lbs, but both fluctuate depending on tire choice.
Gearing is key. Low gearing so I can climb/spin/pedal all day long.
Low gearing doesn't detract from DH speed when I'm on steep terrain that doesn't require pedaling.
On rolling terrain, I just brake early and lightly and pedal in the higher gears.
 

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77 designz bash guard and top chain guide. Have been using these for years and they weigh next to nothing. ZTTO cassette is another new item I have but I'm happy with. Have tried Garbaruk cassettes and the XD version works well but the Shimano version is utter junk. Also Race Face Turbine cranks are hard to beat for weight/durability unless you fork out for Eewings. I've been using a Wren stem on my enduro bike for almost a year now too, super light and pretty cheap.
 

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-SixC bar
-Sram X01 cranks, the current X01 is the old XX1, which has a metal skeleton filled with foam, which is far more durable than RF Next, I beat my old XX1s to hell and back over 5 years DHing, enduro, races from both formats, bashing them on rocks, etc. I eventually broke one, but it stood up to the abuse, unlike my RF Next SLs on my lesser bikes that don't see anywhere near the abuse.
-Shimano pedals...all of them, from cheap 520s to XTR to "trail" versions, they can all be bashed on rocks and keep going.
-I've done a lot better in the last 5 years with derailleurs than in the previous 10, X01s work well for me, tuck in nice, haven't had an issue in a long time. Same thing with X01 cassettes, they are as light as XX1, but cheaper, steel rings so durable, etc.
-Lots of good choices for durable hubs.
-My Nextie 30i rims, they've taken all sorts of bashing and beating in above DH runs, races, enduros, park days, etc. Stuff that would have surely tacoed an aluminum rim they've shrugged off with no problem.
 

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Enduro or DH?

Enduro "all mountain" I have really enjoyed the Raceface Next carbon bars. They have taken a hell of beating and still going strong. That said after 4 years I have put them on what is now my urban assault vehicle slash gravel grinder eg my old SC Tallboy. I bought a new pair for my trail bike. Last season I was trying to figure out why my hands and arms were so beat down on my DH bike. Almost positive it is the AL bars on it. This season I am putting the SixCs on it.

Cranks, Raceface Nxt SL. I can't say they weren't trouble free. One side warratied, they only warrantied the one side. Six months later the other side had the same failure. They wouln't warratny. TO be fair it was out of warranty, but they bascially gave me crash replacement at a grea price point. So really no coplaints. DH bike I'll stick to AL and really some of the good AL forged aren't much heavier than the carbon.

Rims, huge fan of my Ibis 741/742. They were a huge concern when I bought them 4 years ago. Solid AF. I did crack one after hitting a big table top and over shooting it to flat and found the big rock. No questions asked it was repalced. Love the wide carbon rims, can run supper low pressure. Along with being super stiff, ,light, and reliable. Bonus is super easy to mount tubeless. Just make sure to up the PSI before hitting park on your trail bike.. Again on a DH if I had money to burn for sure, until then sticking with AL rims.

Pedals, I am a huge fan on the Raceface Chesters. I had a few RF Affects blow up on me. The affeccts have replaceable bearings but even when replacing I have spun them off thier spindal. No issues with the Chester composites though. They are the goto on my trail bike. On my DH bike I am going to switch to Peddling Innovations, super large platform, needed for me in long days in the park.

All that said your frame is probably one of the biggest benefits of carbon
 

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Spank Oozy rims are fairly light and still really strong.
I've also used DT Revolution spokes on all of my wheel builds and never broken one.
DT Swiss 240S hubs are also really durable and light.
Other than those, all other parts on my bikes are fairly standard weight wise or even a bit on the heavy side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah, i've had some dt swiss hubs and they do the business. I also like xt/xtr clipless predals, they do the business for years. My last set of xtr clipless lastest 6 years.
 

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DT Swiss XMC 1200. Enduro strong, XC weight. (1400ish grams a pair)
Enve (for carbon) or intend (for Alu) stems
Trickstuff brakes, direttissma for Enduro, Maxima for enduro with moar powa babeh (and a touch more weight, but still light)
WTB Volt carbon saddle. weighs about the same as other carbon railed saddles, but my arse likes this one.
 

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I like to hit the big lines and the gnar on my enduro bike. But at the same time i want my bike as light as possible to be able to pedal it for hours.
You don't need a particularly light bike to ride it for hours including significant climbing. It needs to be comfortable, have reasonably efficient suspension and reasonably fast rolling tires. It also needs to not break. Whether it's +/- 3lbs is irrelevant to your ability to do the big ride. If it is your fitness is the problem not a few pounds on your bike.

In fact having a bit of weight on the bike can be a good thing if you are charging steep lines. The bike is harder to deflect off line and stays planted better than a lighter machine.
 

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Light as possible is good, but you can pedal a heavy bike for the same amount of time as a light bike. You'll just climb slower and cover less distance. If you want a light bike, it's to climb and cruise faster, not ride for longer. Look at it this way. If you have a particular route in mind, you'll spend less timer riding it and get done soone on a faster bike.
I agree. When I am riding dirt, I target time, not miles for my efforts. Totally eliminates distance, technical level, and elevation from my plans. Yesterday I targeted a 5 hour ride. I did it on my enduro bike (which is how I train for XC). I probably would have covered another 10-20 miles on my XC bike, but it wouldn't have been as much fun.

I do not have a single part on my enduro bike where weight was a consideration. Though I have added a considerable amount of weight with the spares I keep onboard (Specialized SWAT box).
 

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If you are running a coil shock, I would suggest a lightweight spring. I just swapped to DVO ls spring and I thought it would drop about 100g-150g. I dropped 305g! My new Jade setup is only 100g heavier than the spring swapped out. My Balance now feels light.
 

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Cranks, Raceface Nxt SL. I can't say they weren't trouble free. One side warratied, they only warrantied the one side. Six months later the other side had the same failure. They wouln't warratny. TO be fair it was out of warranty, but they bascially gave me crash replacement at a grea price point. So really no coplaints. DH bike I'll stick to AL and really some of the good AL forged aren't much heavier than the carbon.
Puzzling choice, more-so given that you broke them twice under those conditions.
 

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Eewings are light AND bomb proof. A good combo.

My Magura Carbon Trail brakes are light and perform really well.

I like air suspension over coil for several reasons, in part because of the weight.

Pepi's tire noodles work great at under 100 grams each.

Pay careful attention to your tire choice. I've picked up a fair bit of overall speed by moving away from the standard minions, giving up very little traction, but rolling overall notably faster.

Obviously just choosing an efficient and somewhat light frame. My L Mondraker Foxy 29 weighs like 28.1# built (before pedals and bash guard) and like 30.5# with all my tools and gear attached to the bike. I also chose my repair set up on weight partially.

I do the same as you as I bomb stuff but I'm a WW cause I like pedaling a lot. Rims/ hubs/ spokes have been a thorn in my side. I'm probably going to put together a new set up here soon on the new Onyx hubs, Poly type spokes, and Carbonfan rims (DH rear).

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I had nor heard if EeWings.... Holy mother of all $999 titaium cranks batman!!!

What tyres are you using Suns? I'm findning the minion 3C Exo 2.3 my got to tyre.
I'm open to other ideas. It does get wet and slippery around here so i cant go too lean on tread pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You don't need a particularly light bike to ride it for hours including significant climbing. It needs to be comfortable, have reasonably efficient suspension and reasonably fast rolling tires. It also needs to not break. Whether it's +/- 3lbs is irrelevant to your ability to do the big ride. If it is your fitness is the problem not a few pounds on your bike.

In fact having a bit of weight on the bike can be a good thing if you are charging steep lines. The bike is harder to deflect off line and stays planted better than a lighter machine.
Ok, let me rephrase this part of the statement as it appears to be confusing people.
I am fit, lean and can ride for hours and hours. Yes I agree that a heavy bike can be pedalled for hours, However the effort you expend for the same distance is more or you end up travelling less distance for the same effort. That means you have ridden less gnar because of the heavier bike.

So the ligher the better if you plan on riding up and down. If shuttling and only riding down then heavy is not an issue.
 

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I had nor heard if EeWings.... Holy mother of all $999 titaium cranks batman!!!

What tyres are you using Suns? I'm findning the minion 3C Exo 2.3 my got to tyre.
I'm open to other ideas. It does get wet and slippery around here so i cant go too lean on tread pattern.
The eewings come up for sale, a few times a year. 20% off Jenson coupons are common for instance. I've snapped CF cranks. Basically you get the weight of CF cranks but the rigidity and absolute strength of high end aluminum cranks which weigh around 250 grams more.
I'm on a front Spesh Eliminator 29x2.6 grid and a rear Hans Dampf Soft snakeskin, both with Pepi liners. However, I couldn't recommend that set up for wet conditions as I never ride those conditions.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
On a side note its not that often we get a direct comparison with the same bike/same ride heavier V lighter.

I happen to have 2 Slayers at the moment. One is built with light wheels/tyres/tubless/carbon handle bar.
The other is heavier wheels/tyres/tubes/heavy handlebar. oh and a carbon repair on the frame adding 300 grams.

The difference is 1.4kg weight difference.

Lighter slayer is noticably more accelerative, better at climbing and snappier to turn. Its more fun on the up, on the flat and the mild down. Anything that requires pedalling. On the steeper down light slayer is comparible with heavy slayer with the same size tyres on.

But when up sizing from 2.3 tyres to 2.5 for heavy slayer. The bigger volume 2.5's track better over offcamber wet roots.

Today there was a launch over some stars that had a flat run up. On heavy Slayer i struggled to get enough speed To clear the stairs, when i do it one light slayer its easy to get enough speed.

1.4kg isnt much weight difference, but most of that weight is rotating weight in the wheels and tyres. Its definately less fun for me for everything except gnarly wet down.

If i was doing a push and descend or shuttle day then heavy slayer would be the choice. But for general riding with gnar thrown in light slayer is the business.

Bicycle tire Tire Bicycle frame Bicycle wheel Wheel
Tire Bicycle tire Wheel Bicycle wheel Bicycle wheel rim
 
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