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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, maybe you can help? Wanting to install a Phil Wood square taper bottom bracket on a 2004 Bianchi SASS to use a White Industries single speed ENO crankset. What are the specs of the bottom bracket?

JIS stainless or titanium? 108mm or 113mm?

Aluminum or Stainless cups? 68, 70 or 73mm?

 

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The bottom bracket shell width of your bike determines whether you use a 68, 70, or 73 width bb; just measure the shell width (left to right) with a ruler. I suppose since it's a Bianchi it's possible it's not English threading and Italian instead but some googling should answer that.

The crankset and the chainline you want will determine which spindle length. The materials used are what you want to pay for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Some knowledge from MTBR member, Schmucker: I have a Surly Hub and WI Freewheel as well. The general consensus is that the rear chainline is between 54 and 55mm. ENO cranks have a 47.5mm with a 113mm BB spindle. So let's say 54.5mm rear chainline. (54.5-47.5)*2+113=127mm. Measure your chainline first and make sure. If you go with a Phil Wood BB you'll have ~5mm of left/right adjustment to make corrections. I've seen people use 121mm BB and claim to have a straight chainline with your setup, so there might be some disparity.
 

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Figured I would add this info here as it is the first thing that came up when I searched on goodle: it looks like the SASS BB shell is 68 mm, but my specific bike ha a 73mm Truvativ ISIS BB inside that has some big o-ring spacers that adapt it to the 68mm shell. The crank on it is a Truvativ with a 33t chainring. I imagine that both of these came stock but I am not 100% certain as I bought the bike in 2012.

Since I am posting, figured I'd share some additional info I have learned in my research for the SASS. The rigid fork that comes on the SASS is corrected for 80mm of travel and has a very small axle-to-crown length (~410mm). This makes finding a modern suspension front fork solution almost impossible. While there are some modern suspension forks that are 80mm (e.g., Rockshox Gold) or can have spacers added//removed to get to 80mm from 100 mm (e.g. Markhor 100mm), both of these options are still around 450mm axle to crown length once corrected to 80mm (thats still 4 cm longer than the rigid fork). There are used Fox Floats, Rockshox SIDs, etc. that exist that fit the bike perfectly but they are now 15+ years old and selling on ebay for the price of a new suspension fork ($250+) because there are people desperate to replace their old fork or add a fork to a rigid bike and no one really makes one that fits properly.

From what I have read, the original rims (WTB SpeedDisc) are not tubeless ready. There are methods that exist (e.g., split-tubing) that you could maybe use tto run tubeless, but it is unlikely a LBS will do this for you.

It sounds like it is likely possible to double your gears with a planetary gearbox (e.g., Hammerschmidt or Patterson crankset) if you really want to. If you live somewhere hilly this could make the SASS a good option for daily use.
 
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