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Bottles, Hydro Paks or both

  • Bottles only for me

    Votes: 26 16.7%
  • I'll just take the Hydro Pak

    Votes: 70 44.9%
  • I prefer a combo of both

    Votes: 60 38.5%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey after trying both bottles and Camelback, I have a better poll question. As I see it the Pros and Cons go something like this, but I'd like to hear more thoughts.

Bottle
Pro: Easy to clean, No weight on your back, Nothing adding heat on your back
Con: Amount of fluid, Have to stop in most cases, A bit slower flow rate, Doesn't stay cold

Pak
Pro: 100oz, Can drink on the go, High flow rates, Stays cold, Can carry stuff
Con: Bi*ch to clean, Adds weight to your back, Adds heat

I will probably use bottles on short courses that are loops where I can stop at the loop and carry The Camel on longer rides with water and maybe throw some Gatoraid in the bottle.
 

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BoomingSooner said:
Con: Bi*ch to clean,
News to me. Mines 7years old. Only ever used water in it. I rarely even use soap on it. I just empty it, rinse it, and let it dry. Never moldy, never funky. Simple to clean. I never really got the hard to clean argument.

Adds weight to your back,
You should be fair. You don't list that bottles add weight to your bike.

What about these bottle cons?
Dirty/muddy bottles?

Bottles bouncing out of cages?

No place to store tools/first aid?
 

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Canuckistan
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I prefer my trusty camelbak mule holds 3L of water in the main bladder, and for longer rides, I just chuck a spare 2L bladder in the storage area.

hydration packs don't always add heat to your back, in fact, mine usually cools it...with the magic of ice water...plus, its cold to drink then
 

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ionsmuse said:
If you do not need both, your rides are too short.
That statement is rather narrow-minded. Not everyone has time for long rides. Sometimes a 90 minute spin around a simple trail with a new rider is much more rewarding than an epic 6-hour ride.
 

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HopHeads, Unite!
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How about both?

I run water and electrolytes in my bladder and energy schmoo in a bottle. Keeps the bladder less funky. And I can't stand having nothing to drink but energy schmoo. Makes my mouth cruddy.

Also, try storing the bladder in your fridge between rides. Really slows down the funk growth. You can go months without having to clean it if you ride somewhat regularly.

The ability to more easily drink without stopping rules, too.
 

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tlg said:
News to me. Mines 7years old. Only ever used water in it. I rarely even use soap on it. I just empty it, rinse it, and let it dry. Never moldy, never funky. Simple to clean. I never really got the hard to clean argument.
I agree. I only use water. I just add more water and go. I don't clean it, that would be like maintanence, yuck. Maybe it would be a problem if I used something more than water...
 

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highly visible
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Due to historical car-accident-induced neck injuries, I minimize the weight I carry on my back. Bottles for me.
 

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It is more advantageous to carry the weight on your bike.
A 32 oz. bottle weighs about two pounds.
Carry two bottles and that's four pounds of vibration eating mass.
The beautiful thing is that it doesn't add weight, it only redistributes it.
Not having the weight on my body makes me feel considerably more agile.
 

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GeoKrpan said:
It is more advantageous to carry the weight on your bike.
Go post that in the weight weenies forum.

It's not more advantageous to carry the weight on your bike. It's meerly a preference.

The beautiful thing is that it doesn't add weight, it only redistributes it.
Same with a camelbak.
 

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it all depends...if i have the time to prep my hydro pack, then i'll use that...if i quick gotta get out the door, i'll throw some ice water into my bottle
 

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tlg said:
Go post that in the weight weenies forum.

It's not more advantageous to carry the weight on your bike. It's meerly a preference.

Same with a camelbak.
There is no substitute for mass when in comes to the absorption of vibration.
That's why a "heavy" steel frame is perceived to ride so well.
There is simply more mass there to absorb the vibration.
Adding four pounds to the mass of the frame by carrying the water on it is too good of an opportunity to pass up.
 

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In FTF We Trust
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tlg said:
You should be fair. You don't list that bottles add weight to your bike...

No place to store tools/first aid?
I've hit the point where I don't like anything putting more stress on my shoulders and neck than necessary. I'll usually carry one or two bottles on the bike and a tool, tube, patch kit, and Clif Bar or whatever in my seat pack and jersey pocket(s). One of my bikes only has a single bottle cage mount so if I'm planning a longer ride I'll wear a pack on it, but if I can get away with it, I'll skip the pack every time. One of these day I'll pony up and buy a wingnut pack and maybe then I'll change my tune but until then I'll go as bodily unfettered as possible.
 

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I hate bottles and will only use them on the shortest of road rides but NEVER on a mtn bike ride. I don't even put cages on my bike so that I will never be tempted to use a bottle. They slosh around and add weight to a bike that I spent a fortune trying to lighten. My body is already a fat mess so I'd rather add the weight there. I can't tell you how many road rides I've been on where some squirrel lost a bottle and caused a peleton meltdown. I've witnessed many crashes over the years from people trying to avoid a bottle that rattled out of a cage.

Hydration packs have downsides as well but I prefer the easy access and my back is used to the weight. The biggest problem I have with my Camel Bak is trying to loosen that freakin bladder cap. You gotta be a world class power lifter to remove the darn thing. One day I popped a hand ligament just trying to remove it. Other than that complaint, hydration packs are my favorite way to go, on road or off.
 

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GeoKrpan said:
There is no substitute for mass when in comes to the absorption of vibration.
That's why a "heavy" steel frame is perceived to ride so well.
There is simply more mass there to absorb the vibration.
Adding four pounds to the mass of the frame by carrying the water on it is too good of an opportunity to pass up.
Interesting and I can kind of see your point. People seem to like cheap steel frames well enough.

Question though: is a light bike still a light bike if it has bottles on it?
(i thought most people wanted a light bike...)
 

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Pack on loooong rides, bottle on shorter ones does it for me.

Water only. I used to drink a lot of hammergel, but gave that up because it got too yucky sweet. Now I just drink plain filtered water.




R.
 
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