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sock puppet
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
waterproof, as close to the handlebar as possible (better if it sits right on the handlebar), the bigger the digits the better, price not an issue...

please give me your recommendations...

thx
 

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osokolo said:
waterproof, as close to the handlebar as possible (better if it sits right on the handlebar), the bigger the digits the better, price not an issue...

please give me your recommendations...

thx
Polar S725. 3 rows of info with the middle one being fairly large. The top two lines can also be swapped.
As a bonus, you get a nice HRM for free. ;)

Lou.
 

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sock puppet
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8,104 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i have S610 already...

upstateSC-rider said:
Polar S725. 3 rows of info with the middle one being fairly large. The top two lines can also be swapped.
As a bonus, you get a nice HRM for free. ;)

Lou.
S725 would be an overkill in that case...
 

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osokolo said:
S725 would be an overkill in that case...
In that case I'd have to say the Topeak Panoram. I've had mine for over a year and a half (on another bike) and it's been extremely reliable and easy-to-read.

Lou.
 

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Derailleurless
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9,122 Posts
I don't know if this addresses your waterproof requirement, but I've ridden with this computer in the rain and it hasn't given me any grief.

It's a VDO MC 1.0, a wireless altimeter with a display second only to the Planet Bike Protege (I bugged those Planet Bike guys for a few years for an altimeter version of their computer, but they simply weren't interested -- although I think they have a wireless version of their own in the works, and that'd be worth looking into).

The three primary data points are easy enough to read, although the major weakness of this unit is the instant grade (%) and temperature readout both need to be a point or two larger. They're simply too small for my eyes to read reliably while rolling.

The controls are well laid out, with each of the three buttons controlling a group of functions by category: distance & time; altitude & grade; cumulative data.

Battery life is improved over my last altimeter, a Cateye AT100. My head unit is still going strong on the original button cell after about a year, and the transmitter batteries get about 500 miles between changes. There is no "receiver" battery as I've seen on some other units (Cyclosport?).

I've been a fan of altimeters for many years, and despite the shortcomings of my Cateye AT100, it was still the best one out there until the VDO came along last year. I am much more appreciative of my altitude gain and climb gradiants for the day than I am of my mileage.

If altimetry isn't your game, VDO makes a handful of others ( https://www.cycleparts.de/ ), plus I've read they're responsible for Axiom brand sold by Performance. I'm reasonably certain that these are actual VDO products, not some unknown marketing company licensing the VDO brand name.

I don't know if price needs not be an object any more (did that make sense?) -- my sister just picked up a 4-line Supergo wireless unit for $14. Its mount it a little cheesy, the display lacks contrast at some viewing angles, and the controls are finicky to the point that the whole unit resets if you hold down the wrong combination of buttons, but those are probably things most folks could live with -- for the price. For about double what she paid, Cateye and Sigma both had wireless units worth investigating.



 

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noMAD man
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I haven't gotten a sending unit to last.

osokolo said:
waterproof, as close to the handlebar as possible (better if it sits right on the handlebar), the bigger the digits the better, price not an issue...

please give me your recommendations...

thx
I've tried Specialized, Sigma, and Cateye models, and in every case the sending unit was eventually just shaken apart. I work at a shop so I was able to swap parts to see what had failed. For general XC and trail riding, they may hold up better, but if the trail is very rough, I haven't had much luck with them. I've tried insulating the sending unit on the fork leg by wrapping an inner tube "sock" section on the fork before attaching the sending unit, but it didn't stop the vibration from killing it. I don't ride in mud or rain, so moisture was never an issue--just vibration. I just don't see the necessity of a wireless unit on a mountainbike. I have a wired unit on a 7" travel dual crown fork, and the wire has never failed or become fouled with the tire or bike components. I think wireless units are a novelty more than a necessity.
 
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