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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,

I finally picked up my 08 Trek Fuel EX 9 today!

I'm going to be using it primarily on the roads for now to get back into shape and I'm looking for a good, small, lightweight light to put on the handle bars and a rear red light as well.

I like the L & M Stella Dual 300 because it is so small, but I haven't been able to dig up much info on them.
I also like the looks of the NiteRider Dual 400 - which of those two do you think is better?

I used to have a Niterider Pro12 Digital (or something like that) and it was absolutely amazing! If I could match that output in smaller form light (LED), it would be perfect.

Finally, I'm not looking to totally break the bank on this - I'd say $300 - $400 is the budget.


Any and all ideas are greatly appreciated.


Thanks,

Mike
 

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I've been commuting to work for 3 1/2 years now. I ride as early as 5:00am, and as late as 10:30pm (shift work), rain or shine (I shy away from snow). I started with a weak ass LED light from some company that was sold through the LBS. This lead to a crash in the middle of the damned road because I was going too fast for the light levels and wasn't paying enough attention. Luckily there was no traffic to run me over, because I went down in the midlle of the damned road.

I got home and immediately bought a Nite Rider HID Light. That worked for me for about 3 years. I ended up replacing the bulb once to the tune of $125 with shipping, and I eventually replaced the battery pack with a home made LiPo pack (about another $100).

Now to get to the point: I recently spent $95 shipped on a MagicShine LED light from GeomanGear. I have not touched the Nite Rider since I got the MagicShine. It's smaller, lighter, brighter, and works fantastic. I have since bought 2 more light heads, a helmet mount, some extra connectors (Y cables, etc...) and bunch of Ebay 18650 LiPo cells, and made up two 2 cell battery packs. I now ride in daylight with a single light for visibility, and when riding in the dark, I run 2 light heads for incredible light.

You could buy 2 complete MagicShine light setups for less than $200, and have all the light you'll ever need. Have a look around here, there's tons of info about the MagicShines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice on the MagicShine setup - I'll look into that now.

I'm trying to get the bike as light as possible, but I really need to have some good light output. I need to get at least one light tomorrow so I will have to settle for whatever is local, but if I like the MagicShine setup, I will order it online.

Any other ideas/input?


Thanks,

Mike
 

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I have two magicshines; no dramas so far. Good light for the money.... as long as they last ok

I have use Ayups (off road only) but they are very light.

Aust $250 for a handlebar or helmet set; approx Au$550 for full set. I think near 1000 lumens for full set.

Magicshine advertises 900 lumens but it's a theoretical number.

Great lights; light weight; light batteries; good runtimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I might do a custom build with two MagicShines, anyone have any links to mods they have done with these lights?


-Mike
 

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I like the added features you get with the L&M & Niterider type lights, Having different modes and light levels helps with battery times. The flash feature is nice. I would check to see if L&M dual can set modes individually, one lite on flash is a nice feature, which last year, Niterider didn't do.

Focused beams are nice, your Lumens$$ go where you need/want them.

I love my Son dynamo hub, no batteries works better for me.
 

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Really, when riding on the road, it pays to not try and cut corners. i'd get a good bright light and ride with about 800 lumens minimum and then get the biggest brightest taillight you can get.

I know it doesn't meet your budget, but I'd be looking at some of the DInotte packages that give you either their 140L or 400L taillights and the 800L or 1200L head light. You really don't want to go on the cheap when on the road. If you get in a bad wreck with a car, the cost difference suddenly won't matter.

Having lots of light on the road is a fundamental safety issue to both see hazards at the faster speeds you travel and to be seen. Either of the Dinotte taillights are so amazing in what they do to cars approaching from behind - they slow way down and pass slowly in the opposite lane.

J.
 

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Economical and bright- a pair of Dinotte 200L's, Pro Series AA type. Use one as a high beam, one as a low beam, pointed down. You'll need to block the high beam with your hand for oncoming traffic, it really is too bright if pointed directly at them. For a taillight a Dinotte 140 is really bright. If you shop around you'll just about be within your budget. If you can get your NiteRider working then well under.
 

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California L33 said:
Economical and bright- a pair of Dinotte 200L's, Pro Series AA type. Use one as a high beam, one as a low beam, pointed down. You'll need to block the high beam with your hand for oncoming traffic, it really is too bright if pointed directly at them. For a taillight a Dinotte 140 is really bright. If you shop around you'll just about be within your budget. If you can get your NiteRider working then well under.
The 200L's are nice lights and are great for commuting but too bright for the road!...:skep: ...I think not. I drive for a living and get passed by lots of vehicles with bright lights. Some are annoyingly bright, especially people using dual HID lampsets but I have yet to be blinded by someone on a road bike. That's not to say that if someone had a 1200L setup ( or > ) that it wouldn't be blinding. I really doubt though that someone riding the road would need that much light unless they were downhilling around 30-40mph. I've used my 600L on the road but never felt it necessary to use the highest setting unless I was at speed > 25mph.
 

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Cat-man-do said:
The 200L's are nice lights and are great for commuting but too bright for the road!...:skep: ...I think not. I drive for a living and get passed by lots of vehicles with bright lights. Some are annoyingly bright, especially people using dual HID lampsets but I have yet to be blinded by someone on a road bike. That's not to say that if someone had a 1200L setup ( or > ) that it wouldn't be blinding. I really doubt though that someone riding the road would need that much light unless they were downhilling around 30-40mph. I've used my 600L on the road but never felt it necessary to use the highest setting unless I was at speed > 25mph.
A 200L pointed straight ahead (not angled down) will be blinding to oncoming drivers. You'll get high beams flashed, cursed by pedestrians and other cyclists on MUTs, and if you don't dim it for a cop, probably pulled over. When I first got them I had the first three things happen to me in short order. I though they were a bunch of wimps, so I got off the bike and walked down the road a couple of hundred feet to see what it was like. Maybe because of the height, narrow beam angle, or small reflector, looking straight into that 200L was worse than any car's high beam's I've seen, and car high beams are in the low thousands of lumens each, if I remember correctly. So it's not just the number of lumens, but how they're presented. Angled down like a car's headlight you've got no problems.
 

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California L33 said:
A 200L pointed straight ahead (not angled down) will be blinding to oncoming drivers. You'll get high beams flashed, cursed by pedestrians and other cyclists on MUTs, and if you don't dim it for a cop, probably pulled over. When I first got them I had the first three things happen to me in short order. I though they were a bunch of wimps, so I got off the bike and walked down the road a couple of hundred feet to see what it was like. Maybe because of the height, narrow beam angle, or small reflector, looking straight into that 200L was worse than any car's high beam's I've seen, and car high beams are in the low thousands of lumens each, if I remember correctly. So it's not just the number of lumens, but how they're presented. Angled down like a car's headlight you've got no problems.
...I think I see what you're saying. I have had people flash high beams at me before ( on my bike ) but then again people flash high beams at me when I'm in a car too. People are strange. I've had people wait at stop signs just to see what was coming up the road ( me and my bike lights ). I just think people are surprised and irritated that bikes ( which really do need to be seen..) now have lights that can rival motorcycles and cars.

I've never really thought about it before but I usually do point my lights downward when I'm on the road. A spot 200L has a usable reach of about 75ft.. Most of the places I ride are rural. I suppose in heavy traffic keeping the light pointed down could be more of an issue. Still, being able to SEE a cyclist on the road in my opinion is a good thing. I guess the cops out in Ca. must be somewhat anal. Out here in Md. people drive around with high beams on and no one seems to give a hoot. That's because so many people are upgrading to brighter head lights nowadays I suppose. Personally, I'm to the point where almost nothing fazes me anymore. I figure it this way, if the cars can do it a cyclist should be able to do it ( use bright lights ) as well. ;)
 

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Cat-man-do said:
...I think I see what you're saying. I have had people flash high beams at me before ( on my bike ) but then again people flash high beams at me when I'm in a car too. People are strange. I've had people wait at stop signs just to see what was coming up the road ( me and my bike lights ). I just think people are surprised and irritated that bikes ( which really do need to be seen..) now have lights that can rival motorcycles and cars.

I've never really thought about it before but I usually do point my lights downward when I'm on the road. A spot 200L has a usable reach of about 75ft.. Most of the places I ride are rural. I suppose in heavy traffic keeping the light pointed down could be more of an issue. Still, being able to SEE a cyclist on the road in my opinion is a good thing. I guess the cops out in Ca. must be somewhat anal. Out here in Md. people drive around with high beams on and no one seems to give a hoot. That's because so many people are upgrading to brighter head lights nowadays I suppose. Personally, I'm to the point where almost nothing fazes me anymore. I figure it this way, if the cars can do it a cyclist should be able to do it ( use bright lights ) as well. ;)
You don't have to angle down much to turn your light from blinding to bright, which is what you want. If you point it so the edge of the beam is 40 or so feet ahead, you can see the road, and be seen. With two (one high, one low) you get a great view of the road, and what's in the distance. You just have to 'hand dim' the high pointed light to be polite.

It seems that fewer people around here are driving with their highs on all the time, still enough to make you wonder how stupid people can be, "But I can see so much better. Who cares if I blind someone and they drift into my lane." Bright, HID type lights, are legal for low beam headlights in CA, but only if correctly adjusted like regular headlights- down and to the right. You can also use them for high beams, but are supposed to dim them for oncoming traffic. You can even have auxiliary lights (fog or driving lights), but for some reason you can never have more than 6 lights on the front of a car illuminated at once on a public road. Off road you can have as many as you want.
 
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