Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

Best Fork Oil

  • Golden Spectro

    Votes: 2 4.5%
  • Motul Fork Oil Factory Line

    Votes: 3 6.8%
  • Silkolene Fork Oil

    Votes: 8 18.2%
  • Torco RFF

    Votes: 4 9.1%
  • Maxima Racing Fork Fluid

    Votes: 5 11.4%
  • Bel-Ray Fork Oil

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Ohlins

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Redline Suspension Fluid

    Votes: 8 18.2%
  • Yamalube/Honda/Suzuki Fork Oil

    Votes: 2 4.5%
  • Other

    Votes: 12 27.3%
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
moaaar shimz
Joined
·
9,125 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I also posted it on the DH/FR forum but I think I'll get more responses here.

Here is a list of common fork/shock oils if you need reference/remember the name.

By best I mean you got the best results: better damping, lower stiction, overall better feel etc. Post another oil if you can't find it on the poll (I could only put 10 up there).



Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,533 Posts
Sort of a non-question IMO. The fork behaviour is dominated by viscosity behaviour, which is temperature dependent. I reckon most respondents will have lucked in on a happy brew which just happens to work for their particular circumstances. Others who have got into brewing up their own mixes will probably have gone with the oils that have the most informative data sheets and are readily available.

My answer is Silkolene Pro RSF for the above reasons. I keep stock of 2.5, 5 and 7.5 to brew up what I have come to know I need for a particular application. If I can get away with using a single viscosity, I will, to avoid mixing errors.
 

·
"El Whatever"
Joined
·
18,889 Posts
Off from Zoke (Golden Spectro), Yamalube, Fox (Torco), Motul and Maxima... Torco.

Oil quality or Viscosity Index is not as critical on forks, but for shocks it is. Rather, finding the right viscosity oil for the intended application is way more critical than quality alone.

Not that quality doesn't matter... but is not as critical.

For a shock, look at the Viscosity Index. The higher the better and less prone to cavitation. Even though the vapor pressure is pretty low on most shock oils and they'll hardly cavitate unless your shocks is out of whack.

Also... Synth Vs. Dyno matters little as long as any of both doesn't have additives that damage or swell seals. Synth only needs to be replaced less often, if that matters. I hardly wait for oil to be worn so I rather use cheap oil and replace it often.

That said, Torco stuff is really good.
 

·
Master of None
Joined
·
1,462 Posts
For open bath forks I used Golden Spectro, it is slippery and reduces stiction. On a lot of newer forks the damping fluid is separate from the stanchion bushing lubrication; on those I use Silkolene Pro RSF for the damper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
If you can contend with the viscosity, Mobil 1 atf is really good.

Like others I have various stock.

For years I used Silkolene pro RSF as I got it free and at the time it worked ok. Silkolene I find tends to be less slippery than others and will get sticky when exposed to air, like Ohlins fluid.

Motorex is ok, but needs to be degassed for use in rear dampers.

Torco is good stuff as is KYB-01. I've had problems with Factory Connection GSF which is supposedly 01 but go figuire.

For TC forks, M1 0-20 is almost to slippery.

PK
 

·
Elitest thrill junkie
Joined
·
39,644 Posts
Doesn't matter, the only difference (when going with a different oil supplier) is that you may get a slightly more optimal oil-weight for your application. From my old Z2, to my Stratos S8, to my Shiver, to my 66 (and all sorts of forks in between and after), it doesn't matter, what matters is having the right viscosity.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top