Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The one at Valero did not make me happy. It doesn't clamp on to the valve. You need one hand to hold the nozzle on and one hand to squeeze the lever. Air volume seemed low. Bead never popped. Any better options?
 

·
The 5th knuckle
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
American cycle sport, Marko will hook you up. The guys at Castle Rock Imports ride a bunch and they'd do it as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
908 Posts
Use the compressor to set the bead, maybe 20 lbs. Quickly move to hand pump and run it up to 60-100 lbs until bead sets all the way around. All the compressor does it provide a sudden immense burst of air to get the rubber in contact with the rim. You can hand pump up to proper pressures once it is even barely holding air..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
American Cycle Sport, or The Country Pedaler, are good options. I just hate to not be self sufficient with bike maintenance.

I am kind of a retro grouch who was never really sold on tubeless. The time and energy I wasted trying to mount 1 stupid tire yesterday did not help with my attitude toward tubeless, but I'm still trying to keep an open mind.

Once I gave up, I dumped that gross Stan's fluid, threw in a tube and finished the job in like 3 minutes. Tubes. What a great invention!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Use the compressor to set the bead, maybe 20 lbs. Quickly move to hand pump and run it up to 60-100 lbs until bead sets all the way around.
From experience I have to respectfully disagree. Stan's recommends inflating the tire to either 40 or 45 psi (can't remember exactly which one at the moment.) In the past I too would just keep inflating the tire until the bead seated all the way around. I think I was up around 80 or 90 psi one time and the sidewall of my rim blew out. It literally sounded like a shotgun going off and soaked me and my entire garage with sealant. Scared the living day lights out of me. The rim was toast. So be sure to only take it up to what is recommended on the bottle of sealant. If the tire doesn't seat at that lower pressure try dripping some sealant (or soapy water) on the bead of both sides of the tire. This will act like a lubricant and the tires will seat much better this way. Sure, it may get messy but it's totally worth it!
 

·
bacon! bacon! bacon!
Joined
·
12,423 Posts
American Cycle Sport, or The Country Pedaler, are good options. I just hate to not be self sufficient with bike maintenance.

I am kind of a retro grouch who was never really sold on tubeless. The time and energy I wasted trying to mount 1 stupid tire yesterday did not help with my attitude toward tubeless, but I'm still trying to keep an open mind.

Once I gave up, I dumped that gross Stan's fluid, threw in a tube and finished the job in like 3 minutes. Tubes. What a great invention!
A famous FR bike rider once told me:

"But I mostly run tubeless, which works 97% of the time. The other 3% can be a real f**king b1tch, though. Make you wanna kick puppies and throw tools, in that order."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A famous FR bike rider once told me:

"But I mostly run tubeless, which works 97% of the time. The other 3% can be a real f**king b1tch, though. Make you wanna kick puppies and throw tools, in that order."
Exactly. On the other hand, tubes work 99.9% of the time. And when they don't, you just throw out the old one and put in a new one.
 

·
Old, Slow and now FAT! :)
Joined
·
2,642 Posts
I have found that if I have a bead that will not pop my solution is to first mount the tire with a tube. Inflate it as you would normally with a tube so that the tire pops all the way. Then deflate, and carefully only undo one side of the tire so as to remove the tube and install the valve. Ensure the other side remains seated. Then flip the wheel round so that the "open" side is down and then inflate with the compressor - preferably with the value core removed. It's always worked for me when I have had difficult tires to mount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
I have found that if I have a bead that will not pop my solution is to first mount the tire with a tube.
Doing a ride or two with the tube in also helps to stretch the tire a bit so that it will behave better for tubeless mounting. I've had to do this with two sets of Michelin Wild Race'r "tubeless ready tires" .. on UST tims.
 

·
The Notorious S.L.O
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
Exactly. On the other hand, tubes work 99.9% of the time. And when they don't, you just throw out the old one and put in a new one.
I am just to painfully cheap to go tubeless, regardless of the increased headaches, swearing and spitting I have witnessed as people try to work on them, I just not interested in the paying more for what looks like more pain.
 

·
Rides Uphill Slow
Joined
·
487 Posts
I used a co2 canister to get my bead to pop last night. Worked like a charm. I used a 16 gram but a 25 gram probably would have been a bit better with the 2.4 tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,626 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The strap idea looks promising..

A 6 liter fast release tank designed for truck tires. Hmm, that sounds like it could be a problem.

But, I was thinking it would be a pretty simple invention to have a bottle you could fill with a regular floor pump and then have a rapid release from the bottle to the tire.
 
Joined
·
621 Posts
The short version: Tubeless is a god-send, unless you enjoy fixing flats out on the trail or you are a twice a month, casual rider. Yes, there is a learning curve. No, not not every setup is ideal and easy to do, but some combos are toddler easy. Inflating your mountain tires above 60 is an exciting way to damage your tire, rim, and hearing if sh*t goes pear-shaped (kinda embarrassing having to call a customer to tell them that you have to order them a new rim because of this). If you are an avid rider that understands and enjoys all the facets of tubeless tires, then you owe it to yourself to buy an air compressor. Having trouble getting your tire to seat? Buy what automotive professionals use: a tire bead lubricant such as RuGlyde. Place the lubricant in a spray bottle. Pull back and wet the bead of the already mounted tire. Once you have the initial burst/low pressure inflation, SLOWLY bring the tire up to 40. Watch the bead slowly work its way outward. Be patient. Some combos really suck, but most are predictably easy.

Last argument for pro-tubeless. When was your last flat out on the trail? Mine was in Pueblo sometime in early 2013. Not biggie, put in three dollar bills and a tube, then cleaned up with the pair of shop-quality paper towels that I carry for such occasions. Cutting sidewalls are part of the game down in P-town.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top