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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you check out my thread here:

https://forums.mtbr.com/29er-compon...y-drive-chain-brake-1102072.html#post14067637

You'll see that I'm new to the sport, bought a Marlin 5 and already destroyed the thing after 4 days into riding. I think I need something heavy duty or a bit more advanced for the trails I hit. Lots of climbing/dry trails, some what rocky since we live in BC, Canada - but lots of down hill stuff that can take a beating.

Thanks for any advice. Budget isn't an issue right now but nothing too crazy, I'd like to stay under $3000 Canadian if I can. I was looking at a Fat Bike too...but not sure if there are any that are super strong for what I'm looking to do. Or if you can comment on certain drive chain components you found works best.

I'm 5'11" - 245lbs. I lift heavy, squat over 500, deadlift 600+, and bench about 400. I'm a big rider who needs a bike I can throw around and have it take a beating.

Thanks
 

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I'm similar size to you 6ft, 240lb's...

Use to lift heavy-ish (less than your no.s though) back in my younger days.

If you get seriously into MTB'ing, you'll find that your physical makeup will change slightly.

You'll likely drop weight in your first 6 months too.

Strong bikes I've ridden (+my $0.02)

Kona Process 134
-Kona bikes are built tough
-Also heavy, one of reasons I sold mine
*If you could find something from the Process range, it'd handle what you can dish out.

Giant Reign 2
-Mine was a '17
-Built tough
-Reasonable weight
-Geo meant hard work on climbs
-Super stable/confident in the chunder, best bike at going down I've owned
*'19 models are spec'd with crap drivetrains & brakes (lower end models)

My current mule is a '19 Polygon Siskiu N8.
Probably the heaviest bike I've owned... but, it pedals better than my old Kona/Giant bikes.

Not quite as stable as the Reign at Mach Chicken. Bigger hoops means it doesn't get hung up as much.

I'd love to try the Trek Full Stache. Locally they've dropped in price. If the timing had of been a few months earlier, I'd likely have bought it instead of the N8 o_0

The bikes I've owned were all Alu & pretty good bikes for the price. They never held me back (maybe a little on the climbs).

If money were no object... I'd add the following bikes to my hit list.

Pivot Mach 5.5/Switcblade

Santa Cruz Bronson/Nomad

Ibis Ripmo/HD4

Unfortunately, I don't have a money tree =(

So I buy smart at the mid to lower price point.

Good luck with your bike hunt ^^



'Born to ride!'
 

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Here's a fun vid to watch riding a trail in your area.

And another.


Check with the shop about upcoming demo days for on trail free test rides.

Pinkbike Buy/Sell has listings in your area for good used bikes.
 

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Very few "off the shelf" bikes are going to stand up to you. My suggestion would be to find a frame that suits your needs. I would say based on your height a 27.5 or 27.5+ hard tail (I say hard tail because full suspension bikes might not like what you do to them, and as you get better at riding you will be just fine w/o rear suspension) that is build around a 140-150mm fork is a great start.

Where big guys need the most help is drivetrain, wheels, and a fork. I would have mikesee at lacemine29 build some nice wheels for you. Chris King is the best hub for clydes, but DT swiss and Onyx also stand up well. For drivetrain I would say Shimano XT or Saint crankset, and 1x11 with Shimano 11-46 cassette (cheapest 11speed cassette, you will probably be going through one a year). KMC 11.93 chain is a great clyde option.

Forks are going to be another area where you will want to invest some money and possibly have custom tuned. Rockshox Pike, MRP Ribbon are both great options. Other than that improving technique will really go a long way to helping keep your bike together.
 

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jcd's best friend
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I'm 5'11" and 250 pounds. I love riding Transition bikes! Their 2018 and newer aluminum frames are very burly and handles everything I throw at them. It's crazy to hear you demolished the Marlin already! I understand the terrain you ride. I live just south of you in WA. We have more roots and climbs down here while you guys have all the rocks.
 

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If you check out my thread here:

https://forums.mtbr.com/29er-compon...y-drive-chain-brake-1102072.html#post14067637

You'll see that I'm new to the sport, bought a Marlin 5 and already destroyed the thing after 4 days into riding. I think I need something heavy duty or a bit more advanced for the trails I hit. Lots of climbing/dry trails, some what rocky since we live in BC, Canada - but lots of down hill stuff that can take a beating.

Thanks for any advice. Budget isn't an issue right now but nothing too crazy, I'd like to stay under $3000 Canadian if I can. I was looking at a Fat Bike too...but not sure if there are any that are super strong for what I'm looking to do. Or if you can comment on certain drive chain components you found works best.

I'm 5'11" - 245lbs. I lift heavy, squat over 500, deadlift 600+, and bench about 400. I'm a big rider who needs a bike I can throw around and have it take a beating.

Thanks
How exactly did "destroy" your bike? I'm assuming that you didn't fold the thing in half. From your other post, it looks like you just did some damage to some drivetrain components.

As a big guy (6'5"~290lb) you need to acknowledge the strain that you put o the components in your drivetrain. Doing things like changing gears while under heavy load can kill chains, chainrings and cassette cogs. Way way back before I took a hiatus from riding, I bent a chainring doing exactly that, and ever since I put a conscious deload on the pedals when changing gears. Since I got back into riding about 11 years ago, the only thing that I have broken is a chain on the bike I leave in my trainer, and it cops a massive beating with standing starts and big torque efforts. I monitor my equipment and change things like chains and cassettes before they come to their dying point.

Do the research and find out what kind of componentry you want to aim at cost wise. Personally, I run Shinamo stuff because it may be a touch "less nice" than SRAM, the cost of parts is just way more economical for me down in Oz. I don't think I'd be too far wrong in saying that most mid level and up componentry should handle you. For that extra level, perhaps look at gear made for the super abusive downhill market.
 

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Yeah, Brawlo is a BIG GUY - I would say he is in the threshold of really BIG DUDES! I never considered myself a "Big Guy" even when I was younger and maturing into adulthood and into middle-age numbers; however, population average places me in the big guy category: I consider myself a "Small Big Guy" ~ 6ft 1" and fluctuate between 260lbs and 270lbs. I cannot ride a hardtail - ever since I bought my 1997 Cannondale SuperV900 in January 1998: I felt like I stole it from the Washington Bike Center - I paid below $1000.00 on clearance.

I have enjoyed my Cannondale SV900 for many, many years; it has proven to be durable to the punishment I have put on it over the 1000's of 1000's of miles on the single-track trails, dirt, gravel and paved trails of northern Virginia; this bicycle took the punishment of "The Meadowlands" of New Jersey [Geez Louise, I thought I rode up on a mafia hit job - ~ 50 yards; I don't know what I saw, but my senses told me to get the hell out of there: I actually rode through the marshes of the meadowlands then I had to ride on the rails being alert for trains - it was the scariest ride for me. This bicycle has been great for me since the January 1998.

I have been trying to ride my CDSV900 since I returned to Florida in 2015 - I never thought I would hate living in Florida. A lot has change since I left in the 1980's. It is very, very dangerous to ride a bicycle in the ******* Riviera - it wasn't dangerous for me as a kid riding my 1980 Red Ross 12-speed, which was my high school graduation gift and transportation in college. I might be able to get that old bicycle back from my nephew living in NJ - he rode it for a couple of years. That Red Ross bicycle was a very good bicycle for me too. I rode my Red Ross all over the ******* Riviera and in Mississippi - NEVER GOT FLATS like I experienced in recent years.

I believe bicycle tires are inferior today compared to yester-years! Why do I have to purchase tire liners to prevent flats? inferior tires! I finally bit the bullet and purchased the Rhinodillo brown tire liners; installed them yesterday on my bicycle; I am cleaning my bicycle in preparation for my return to riding regularly. I pray I have a safe, enjoyable riding season followed by many safe and enjoyable riding seasons.

Agree = "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"
 

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Here's a fun vid to watch riding a trail in your area.

And another.


Check with the shop about upcoming demo days for on trail free test rides.

Pinkbike Buy/Sell has listings in your area for good used bikes.
Thanks for sharing - funny video - I never rode trails like that in NOVA! I do remember the trail "care-takers" making the trails easier. I know "Difficult Run" trail was not a top rated suicide crazy ass trail even at its peak of "Difficulty", but it was challenging for me. The guys in the video sounded as if they were from one of the ANZAC countries?
 

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Thanks for sharing - funny video - I never rode trails like that in NOVA! I do remember the trail "care-takers" making the trails easier. I know "Difficult Run" trail was not a top rated suicide crazy ass trail even at its peak of "Difficulty", but it was challenging for me. The guys in the video sounded as if they were from one of the ANZAC countries?
They are all from Canadia. It's Wade Simmons, he's an mtb god.
 

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A Trek Marin really isn't much more than an entry level bike so it's not surprising that it was destroyed. I'm 300+ and don't destroy bikes and I ride fairly hard on fairly nasty terrain. I am currently on a DiamondBack Release and no issues. I was on a Norco Torrent HT prior to that and it was perfect. Key is to get at least mid-tier components and if possible, custom wheels. Thus far I've had nothing but complete success running WTB rims and Hope hubs though some sensitive wankers like to cry about them being too loud. They make noise, deal with it. But they are pretty darn near bombproof too. 32 spokes. Stout rims. Hand built. Mid-tier components (on GX Eagle now), big rotors, 4 piston front brake. Air fork with 35mm or 36mm stanchions. You should be good to go.

There's also a lot to be said about learning how to ride as well. Proper shifting and braking as to not destroy drivetrains. Ride light and not break seat posts, saddles, or cranks. Don't just bash into things and save your rims. Understand that getting air and being really heavy isn't easy on frames or suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A Trek Marin really isn't much more than an entry level bike so it's not surprising that it was destroyed. I'm 300+ and don't destroy bikes and I ride fairly hard on fairly nasty terrain. I am currently on a DiamondBack Release and no issues. I was on a Norco Torrent HT prior to that and it was perfect. Key is to get at least mid-tier components and if possible, custom wheels. Thus far I've had nothing but complete success running WTB rims and Hope hubs though some sensitive wankers like to cry about them being too loud. They make noise, deal with it. But they are pretty darn near bombproof too. 32 spokes. Stout rims. Hand built. Mid-tier components (on GX Eagle now), big rotors, 4 piston front brake. Air fork with 35mm or 36mm stanchions. You should be good to go.

There's also a lot to be said about learning how to ride as well. Proper shifting and braking as to not destroy drivetrains. Ride light and not break seat posts, saddles, or cranks. Don't just bash into things and save your rims. Understand that getting air and being really heavy isn't easy on frames or suspension.
Haha 100% true story. My Marlin 5 is running great. My shop was able to replace my chainring and it runs solid. I'm a lot "easier" on it during my trail runs now, and I think I've learned to not put too much pressure on the bike during shifts. It's a solid bike and will last me this year while I learn to ride and get my fitness up to par.

I've been taking this time to learn and study what new bike I want to get. I've been looking at a few different options.

Should I go FS, Rigid, or normal Hardtail with front fork? I'm probably going to go with a conservative budget of around $2000-$2500. What's the strongest and best bike I can get for that price range?

I do:

Trail/Downhill mountain stuff
Riding around town on pavement

I was thinking about getting a cheap entry level road bike for $1000 for riding around town and getting a nicer mountain bike for $1500 but not sure if that's smart, if theres a bike out there that can do both.
 

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Kona wozo seems very advanced geo but super flexible design for the combinations you can put together. As in fat bike ready etc. I think its stock w a great fork and 3.25" tirees
 

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I tend to think the in between road versus offroad bikes aren't the best for serious mountainbiking. More adventure excursion/bikepacking. I'd get exactly the right mountainbike, and maybe put slicker tires on your current bike and use for asphalt. Then eventually get the right road or cyclocross bike.

FWIW, this bike is on my N + 1 list. It's at the top, in fact:
https://allcitycycles.com/bikes/electric_queen

Well, along with 3 others from that page. And a Salsa Timberjack. Maybe a Beargrease. Oh, I like the Mukluk, too. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I tend to think the in between road versus offroad bikes aren't the best for serious mountainbiking. More adventure excursion/bikepacking. I'd get exactly the right mountainbike, and maybe put slicker tires on your current bike and use for asphalt. Then eventually get the right road or cyclocross bike.

FWIW, this bike is on my N + 1 list. It's at the top, in fact:
https://allcitycycles.com/bikes/electric_queen

Well, along with 3 others from that page. And a Salsa Timberjack. Maybe a Beargrease. Oh, I like the Mukluk, too. :)
That's actually not a bad idea. I was going to give my wife my Marlin 5 so she can ride the trails with me, that's why I was thinking about getting a entry level ~$1000 road bike, and then $1500-$2000 for a mountain bike for myself.
 

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jcd's best friend
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I've been taking this time to learn and study what new bike I want to get. I've been looking at a few different options.

Should I go FS, Rigid, or normal Hardtail with front fork? I'm probably going to go with a conservative budget of around $2000-$2500. What's the strongest and best bike I can get for that price range?

I do:

Trail/Downhill mountain stuff
Riding around town on pavement

I was thinking about getting a cheap entry level road bike for $1000 for riding around town and getting a nicer mountain bike for $1500 but not sure if that's smart, if theres a bike out there that can do both.
I do recommend a road bike for the road or streets. That's how I burned 30 pounds in 6 months. Road cycling also a great way to help add more fitness and variety to your cycling. I think you should consider a full suspension if you find yourself going hard on your current bike. There are plenty of options available out there. If you want to stick with Trek, their carbon frames are rated up to 300 pounds of total weight. This includes their road bikes too.
 

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The suspension fork on the Marlin isn’t an air fork, more a pogo stick. If she is going to ride those trails, she’ll need proper suspension. It’s safer, for one.

But, does she want to mountainbike? Or bike at all?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The suspension fork on the Marlin isn't an air fork, more a pogo stick. If she is going to ride those trails, she'll need proper suspension. It's safer, for one.

But, does she want to mountainbike? Or bike at all?
She wants a bike to ride with me on trails and around town, yes. She wouldn't take the sport very seriously and highly doubt would tear the bike up like I would, she just wants to be a part of it lol.

I'll look into a FS bike for myself and a road bike. Any road bike suggestions for a man my size?
 
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