Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
a.k.a. BicycleKicks
Joined
·
1,138 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to know where blue loctite should and should not be used on the bike.

When I installed my Juicy 7 brakes, the rotor bolts had what I assume was blue loctite already on the threads. I've also read that it can be used on the outside of pivot cartridge bearings to keep them from moving around or creeking.

How about chainring bolts? Stem bolts? Brake caliper mounting bolts? etc etc. Of course you *could* put the stuff virtually everywhere, but there must be a few places where it really IS recommended and places where it is NOT recommended.

... because curious riders want to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
What ever bolts are really important to your ride, can't take a ton of torque and you don't mess with often. Some things can easily be held on by torque (like pedals, and freewheel lockrings) and some things can't (they would snap) like disc rotor bolts and caliper mounts.
you decide
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Rich A. said:
I've also read that it can be used on the outside of pivot cartridge bearings to keep them from moving around or creeking.
You want press fit loctite for this application. Colour isn't always accurate with Loctite, but mine is green. I don't have the actual number on hand, sorry.

BL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,061 Posts
Rich A. said:
I'd like to know where blue loctite should and should not be used on the bike.
One of the problems with loctite is that it sometimes goes where you don't want it. E.g. there's a reach adjustment screw on my Hayes brake lever that frequently moves about. Loctite works well for making it stay put, but getting the loctite on the threads of the adjustment screw and nowhere else can be a bit difficult. As a consequence, it took several tries to get it right. On my first attempts, I got loctite on the lever pivots and, a day or so later, the brake lever didn't move very well . Fortunately, I was able to scrape the loctite off the pivot after disassembling the lever assembly. (I finally realized that I could get the loctite where I wanted it when the lever was disassembled.)

After that experience, I only use loctite on bolts with which I've had problems keeping tight. As another poster has written, most bolts will stay tight if torqued correctly.
 

·
EDR
Joined
·
10,303 Posts
You can use a medium strength thread-locker anywhere you want to keep a bolt from comming loose with no worries. You can still remove the bolt with hand tools. it's the high strength (often red) that you need to be careful with (and perhaps very small screws/bolts that can't k

FWIW I use blue on my caliper bolts, rotor bolts, caliper adaptor bolts, der. hanger bolts and one of the bolts that mounts my shock to the dogbone. A few of these items like the shock mount and der. hanger screws have come loose on me, the other stuff hasn't but I like to be safe. If anything else comes loose I'll use it there as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Very good, LOL

A new kid in our mechanical dept used green loctite to lube some bearings rather then to install them. It was in part of a protection device in a 1000 hp DC electric drive equipment, very dramtic results.

006_007 said:
best place - for hayes users on the adjustment screw. I only use it now to mount my calipers and rotors.

worst place - as chain lube :nono:
 

·
MTB Rider
Joined
·
3,007 Posts
Loctite paste ...

KevinB said:
One of the problems with loctite is that it sometimes goes where you don't want it. E.g. there's a reach adjustment screw on my Hayes brake lever that frequently moves about. Loctite works well for making it stay put, but getting the loctite on the threads of the adjustment screw and nowhere else can be a bit difficult. As a consequence, it took several tries to get it right. On my first attempts, I got loctite on the lever pivots and, a day or so later, the brake lever didn't move very well . Fortunately, I was able to scrape the loctite off the pivot after disassembling the lever assembly. (I finally realized that I could get the loctite where I wanted it when the lever was disassembled.)

After that experience, I only use loctite on bolts with which I've had problems keeping tight. As another poster has written, most bolts will stay tight if torqued correctly.
Loctite is available as a paste as well. It comes in tubes that will remind you of Chapstick. This will allow you to put it somewhere and it will stay.
 

·
A wheelist
Joined
·
5,991 Posts
Rich A. said:
where it really IS recommended and places where it is NOT recommended.
Where to use it - any thread that has a history of coming loose even though it's been sufficiently torqued.

Where not to use it - any thread that never comes loose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Once you've removed a bolt that was Loctited, how do you remove the old Loctite from the threaded area before applying new Loctite?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
easiest way i found it to get a pick set from sears.....very friggin' pointy, so be carful.....much like dentist picks. just follow around the thread. the dried loctite comes right out. the paste version is like a deodorant stick....it is the schnizz.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,061 Posts
Bull_D said:
easiest way i found it to get a pick set from sears.....very friggin' pointy, so be carful.....much like dentist picks. just follow around the thread. the dried loctite comes right out.
Yep, that's how I do it, with a pick.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top