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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a stock small 2008 Reign X1. The fork is the Van R 36 but I'm thinking of getting something with more travel for next season. I need something reliable but can't pay full price on the fork. What would you guys recommend? The totem look awesome but seem needy in term on regular maintenance. The 08's 66 seemed to have a lot of default so I would probably have to look for previous years fork if I go for marzocchi(2007, 2006) Were those better? Finally, I'm 5'7" and pretty light at 150 full geared.

Your thoughts?
 

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umm. it's pretty much 66 (don't trust new zokes these days), or totems if you're staying single crown. I'm personally going with a boxxer, since it's the same dimensions as a totem, but more DH (what Iike to do). plus an extra inch of travel to boot.

I'd say stick with the 36, or get a totem or boxxer.

there's also the magura wotan (i think) that fits the bill, but I've got no experience with it.
 

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Fragglepuss The Chaste
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Just out of curiosity, why do you want to put a 180mm fork on that bike? Especially on a small frame?
That would really throw the geometry and ride characteristics of that bike way off, which seem fairly dead on with a Fox 36 (at least on my XL frame) IMO.

The Totem's a really tall fork as are the 66's but you also add a ton of front end weight with a 66 and they (2007 and newer) aren't really more reliable in terms of maintenance than a Totem.

As a visual: Swapping the Totem Solo Air off my Sunday for a Fox 40 really did nothing to alter the HA or BB height of the bike, but you would really slacken the HA out a lot on that Reign X. Which would in turn, make your steering response a bit sluggish, raise your BB and lengthen your wheel base.

My two cents: Save your hard earned money as you've got a really decent set up already.
 

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well, when it comes down to it, slackening the steering out a bit makes the bike handle a good bit better IMO. I've got a 170mm 66 on mine (~10mm taller than a 36), and feels quite nice with a 50mm stem. give you a half degree slacker, slows things down, and makes everything very stable. still have no problem bending in and around turns, and BB height change is very small. still turns like it's on rails.

Plus, the reignX has such a low BB that there's a good bit of room to add height without getting too high. most of the best turning DH frames I've heard of have a BB that's a solid 3/4" higher than a reign. granted, mine is a large frame, and the BB will raise higher on a small, but still, I don't see it being a problem. I can still relatively easily bottom a pedal out on the ground if I'm not careful (170mm arms)

It's not a huge change from a 36 to a totem or something. yeah, 20mm of A2C, but that adds nice, slack stability, and doesn't affect BB height too much. I will say, though, if you're going to be doing a lot of trail riding, probably just stick to the 36. a reign CAN climb with a big fork, but it does so grudgingly
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I do like the bike like it is now when riding the trails around town. But when it comes to going to Bromont and Ste-Anne I can't help thinking that it would be great to have a touch more travel and a slackened geometry.

Its my only one bike and I use it as a do it all one. Since I hit trails a few times a week and I go to the bigger mountain once in every weekend, I do need to keep that bike as polyvalent as possible. I wouldn't want to make the bike very sluggy going uphill but I do want to have as much fun as possible freeriding.
 

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I understand what you mean, I think on the small and having too much A2C is not the best bet, if only on the small...in saying that though, getting the Totem is a great idea as it is a very versatile fork and with the solo air it is adjustable making climbing a doable thing. It is an easy enough task taking the fork off and putting another more burly fork on to do some of that more gnar-gnar riding, so you may be lucky to pick up a 2nd hand model.

Buyer be wary though...

The 08 model RS Totem Solo Airs had their fair share of probs though and they were very needy in terms of maintenance...ask around though and really do a bit of research as to what fork is less of an attention grabber.
 

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I guess I'm thinking quite different from many on here. My XO started out quite light, but I've been constantly beefing it up ever since I got it last spring at sub 34lbs (got it with a 170mm 66 light). It's now ~36 lbs and I still love it, maybe more.

Initially I put on a great light rear wheel, and thin walled tires (ghetto tubeless), light saddle, but then...
- Lots of tube and tape chainstay protection ;)
- gravity dropper
- Mallet M's or MG-1's depending on ride
- sick of flat tires, I've slowly built up to super thick double walled Tubeless tires and while it doesn't pedal as easy, it is super reliable and more fun on the down
- Pulled the DHX air and have swapped to a Romic coil - much more refined feel and keeps the BB a bit higher through small bumps
- have a blackspire, but need to grind some chainring bolts to use it
- I'm planning on a Totem coil next spring

IMHO - people blame HA too much for climbing issues. I out climb many people on my DH bike with a 888. Body position is what keeps the front end down, not a few degrees of HA. You adjust to what you ride. A steeper head angle doesn't make you climb any faster, it just makes it so you don't need to shift forward quite as much. Adding weight to the front end will make you need to use more body movement to position the bike off drops and jumps, but if anything it helps keep the front end down while climbing. It will also raise the BB a bit which I wouldn't mind. 13.8" is very low for slow rocky riding. The ONLY negative I see to a longer fork is the weight when you are losing steam up a climb and need to lift the front end over a rock.

To me, this bike is the bike I use most often. There aren't many things I wouldn't do on this bike, and it is super reliable how it's built now. I would gladly go ride a 50 mile epic on it as long as the group wasn't a bunch of XC weenies. If my DH bike is out of commission I would ride it lift served, and for jumping, it is just...awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey Phat,
Thanks for your opinion on all this, it really help. I am clearly not as experienced as you and most of the guys that posted here and since this is only my second bike(first full suspension) I just can't compare with previous riggs.

I'm curious to hear what other people runs on their Reing X but so far, I'm leaning towards buying a totem or 2007 or 2006 66 rcx2.
 

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I'm running a 2006 66SL. geometry-wise, I love the longer fork. sets the HA right about 66.5, and the BB at 13.75 on a large frame (555mm a2c)

I don't wanna recommend the 66SL though. Mine's been a real pain to get tuned up anywhere near rideable, and even now, it's pretty nasty. HUGE amounts of initial stiction (I can't make the fork bob if I wanted to), and a rather difficult to dial air setup makes me dislike it even more.

with that said, I think the 66 RC2X (the coil) is supposed to be amazing. super smooth and predictable.

I say go totem though. sweet forks, very stiff/burly, and rockshox has a really nice damper in them too. just go coil :thumbsup:
 

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Bryguy17 said:
I'm running a 2006 66SL. geometry-wise, I love the longer fork. sets the HA right about 66.5, and the BB at 13.75 on a large frame (555mm a2c)

I don't wanna recommend the 66SL though. Mine's been a real pain to get tuned up anywhere near rideable, and even now, it's pretty nasty. HUGE amounts of initial stiction (I can't make the fork bob if I wanted to), and a rather difficult to dial air setup makes me dislike it even more
I am not sure how long you have had the 66 SL or if you had it serviced, but there were some issues with the lowers on the 2006 66 SLs. I had to send mine back to Marzocchi and they changed out the loweers. I think the problem had something to do with the casting of the lowers and they were slightly twisted. Initial stiction was the main problem. Why the never came out with a recall for this problem is beyond me.

The fork takes some time to set up but once dialed it is a pretty solid fork. The fact that you can adjust the travel from 170 mm down to 130 mm is a nice feature and makes the fork very versatile. I am about 180 lbs and run about 20-22 lbs in both positive chambers and about 75 lbs in the negative chamber. I seldom use the PAR chamber. It is hard to get an accurate reading on most fork pumps so I usually just count strokes of air.

Hope this helps.

TG
 

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G-AIR said:
I am not sure how long you have had the 66 SL or if you had it serviced, but there were some issues with the lowers on the 2006 66 SLs. I had to send mine back to Marzocchi and they changed out the loweers. I think the problem had something to do with the casting of the lowers and they were slightly twisted. Initial stiction was the main problem. Why the never came out with a recall for this problem is beyond me.

The fork takes some time to set up but once dialed it is a pretty solid fork. The fact that you can adjust the travel from 170 mm down to 130 mm is a nice feature and makes the fork very versatile. I am about 180 lbs and run about 20-22 lbs in both positive chambers and about 75 lbs in the negative chamber. I seldom use the PAR chamber. It is hard to get an accurate reading on most fork pumps so I usually just count strokes of air.

Hope this helps.

TG
those are right about the settings I'm using on mine, sitting at 180lbs as well. still massively sticky in the first inch of travel or so. once you hit something chunky (like a 3" rock or root), then it's smooth sailing. Every bump under 2" is taken up by tire compliance, and a combination of fork flex and the rear suspension.

I'm figuring that the twisted lowers are the source of most of the stiction though. I know the axle doesn't line up perfectly when you put it in (2-3mm off). I'm going to call marzocchi tomorrow and see what they can do for me. needs new bushings (sloppy) and oil anyway...
 
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