Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Giant Yukon, 2006, with the stock saddle. I ride pretty bumpy tracks, but no drops more than about 12", with a few log jumps (not bunny hops but climb-overs).

I spend a lot of time off the saddle. I try to ride hard but ride "light" (legs do the work), but if I do a jump I often use either my thighs or my bum to stop the saddle <G>. That's because my rides are highly varied and I am not about to stop and adjust the saddle every 10 minutes.

I noticed today that the saddle rails are bent enough to have cracked the covering / paint.

I realise that should not be happening. Are these only so-so anyway?

I feel pretty comfortable with the setup of the bike, in that I feel OK and safe riding under most conditions. I have ridden a bike with a shorter seat-to-head distance and was not at all happy; I felt just too far over the front.

Handling is fine.

But is the bike /setup too long for me in that I cannot get back past the saddle? At present, with my saddle in the "GP" height I usually use, I would probably rip off my nuts when the back of the bike came up to meet me.

My wife rides a lot "heavier" than I do (sits on the saddle a lot more) but does not ride not as hard. Her saddle rails are fine. She is not a lightweight.

If it's just crappy metal in the rails then I will stay with my setup and get a tougher saddle.

I think I am asking for thoughts. I was quite surprised to see what damage I had done to the rails.

Nick
 

·
AKA Dr.Nob
Joined
·
887 Posts
Cheap bike = cheap saddle.

"But is the bike /setup too long for me in that I cannot get back past the saddle? At present, with my saddle in the "GP" height I usually use, I would probably rip off my nuts when the back of the bike came up to meet me."


I think the problem isn't that you "cannot" get back past the saddle. It is more likely to be you "will not" go past the saddle.

Go practice on some flat soft park grass and get over your fear. It is what is holding you back (or more precisely what is holding you from getting back)
 

·
Tough Guy Extraordinaire
Joined
·
601 Posts
If your rails are not at least marginally centered over your seat post, you'll bend and break them pretty often. I ride with my saddle pretty far back and I would go through saddles fairly often. So I switched to a setback seat post to center the rails over the post. Problem solved. Not sure how yours hits the post, but it might be worth a try. Remember most setback posts can work in either direction!
 

·
Self Appointed Judge&Jury
Joined
·
45,798 Posts
Bent saddle rails....

Solution: Important to follow in order.
#1 Lose weight
#2 Buy new saddle
 

·
Meatpuppet
Joined
·
536 Posts
OldNick-
IMO- rails bend much more riding xc, because your "trying" to pedal in the saddle. Thats where your power comes from. In doing this and bouncing over rocks, roots bumps or whateverthey'll bend. Im 170 plus a 5-10lb pack its inevitable. I dont know about Ti seat rails but screw that, until you see a crack. Run it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
dirtrodr said:
OldNick-
IMO- rails bend much more riding xc, because your "trying" to pedal in the saddle. Thats where your power comes from. In doing this and bouncing over rocks, roots bumps or whateverthey'll bend. Im 170 plus a 5-10lb pack its inevitable. I dont know about Ti seat rails but screw that, until you see a crack. Run it.
Hey! I am starting to feel quite _proud_ of those poor little suckers! :D

Thanks. At least it's not just me. As you say Ti rails may be better, but I have had this saddle for ...two..? .years now, so if I am not completely in the wrong, I can live with that.

I have to say that I am not a high-jumper, but I feel that the Yukon has actually stood up very well to the way I have treated it.

Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
gumbymark said:
Cheap bike = cheap saddle.

"But is the bike /setup too long for me in that I cannot get back past the saddle? At present, with my saddle in the "GP" height I usually use, I would probably rip off my nuts when the back of the bike came up to meet me."


I think the problem isn't that you "cannot" get back past the saddle. It is more likely to be you "will not" go past the saddle.

Go practice on some flat soft park grass and get over your fear. It is what is holding you back (or more precisely what is holding you from getting back)
Ok. Your first line PO'd me a bit.

However I tried your idea (I _have_ done it before, I think).

It ain't fear! <G> I rode over some drops and stuff in the paddock at just pre-jump speed with my bum over the back wheel....it's simply unfitness. After a few, I could feel it starting to hurt. If I hit some of the stuff that bends my saddle, I would be "kissing" :eekster: the back wheel at my present state of strength in that pose. I need to see if more paddock practice helps. Seeing that I am in my mid-fifties, I may not get there. Wheel see. (ark ark)

Having said that, it _is_ a most stressful position. I have watched the trials guys and I cannot understand how they can drop 4-5' or more like that. but then they have _no_ saddle....no choice! <G>

Nick
 

·
Vaginatarian
Joined
·
5,686 Posts
ti rails bend easier than crmo they're just lighter
having the saddle centered on the clamp helps, too far forward or rearward doesnt allow the rails to flex properly so they bend or crack.
when doing drops and jumps you shouldnt be sitting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
dan0 said:
ti rails bend easier than crmo they're just lighter
having the saddle centered on the clamp helps, too far forward or rearward doesnt allow the rails to flex properly so they bend or crack.
when doing drops and jumps you shouldnt be sitting
OK. Ti is funny stuff. It's like carbon fibre. We can't resist saying "Ahah! It's stronger, let's use a lot less!" <G>

I do not sit when going over things. I actually quite often get off the saddle when going uphill, not to actually stand (lose rear traction) but just take weight off the saddle to get my feet on the pedals and stop the bumping. I spend most of my riding time out of the saddle. It's lot easier on more than just the saddle! <G>. Also I ride with flat pedals,and getting weight on the feet keeps them onboard. All of our rides are on gravel, with 2-3" rocks and 6-12" ones elsewhere. Nothing extreme but constantly bumpy.

But there are a fair few rocks and things round here that require that I either get well back (bum over wheel) , or stop the saddle coming up too high with my thighs, and that would seem to be the problem. They are not good "jumps" in that there is no on-ramp, just a ruddy great lump in the ground. So the front wheel is hitting the ground just about the time the back wheel is getting rammed up into the air. They are the ones that scare me when I think of having my rear hanging out over a spinning, knobbly tyre. I am not sure my body could fight the shock force enough to stop the dreaded result.

The saddle is not bad for centre, but I think that probably I am applying uneven pressure at the back when I sit back, but still get the saddle hitting me on some of the tougher bits.

Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
dan0 said:
if all else is good , then you could probably use a DH saddle (thicker rails)
Ok. That may be worth looking at in the near future.

Trouble is I have yet to find a decent LBS, so it's Web buy time again.

Oh well. I do have a shopping list. I just did nit think a saddle would be on the list.

Nick
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top