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I just started biking last week and I have already bent the cog on 3rd gear going over logs. Has anyone else had this problem when they first started riding. Do they make any super strong ones that I should replace or should I just expect to do this a few times until i get better at it? I think its called a crank. I am way new so excuse me if I have the terminology wrong. It is the big third gear cog by the pedals.
 

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Domestic Fowl
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I think you're talking about the chainrings (the big gears up front). The crank (or crank arms) is what the chainrings and pedals are attached to.

So, you bent a tooth on your big chainring? It happens if you hit stuff like logs or rocks. Generally, you want to avoid this. Some parts are tougher than others. Usually, cheaper parts bend/break easier. They do make chainring guards you can add to your bike, but you don't see them too much on regular cross country type mountain bikes, usually on freeride, downhill and trials bikes.
 

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Nervous Descender
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Pace said:
I just started biking last week and I have already bent the cog on 3rd gear going over logs. Has anyone else had this problem when they first started riding. Do they make any super strong ones that I should replace or should I just expect to do this a few times until i get better at it? I think its called a crank. I am way new so excuse me if I have the terminology wrong. It is the big third gear cog by the pedals.
Sounds like you bent your big chainring. We bigger guys (me, at least) do that frequently when we mis-time a log jump or when it hits going over something big. Usually it will bend in the same place, and slightly away from the bike.

All chainrings, even the Shimano-would-have-you-believe-they're-worth-more-than-gold XTR rings will bend if you smack 'em hard on a log. There are two fixes (which don't involve buying new rings):

On the Trail: While still on the bike, unclip your right foot and use the heel of you shoe as a hammer to whack the chainring back into relative straightness.

At Home: Use an adjustable wrench to bend the ring back into true- use the front deraileur as a guide as you rotate the ring to determine if it is close to true or where it is still out of whack. You can also use the wrench to straighten individual teeth which are bent.

Chainrings can be straightened many times before needing replacement. Eventually, your technique will improve and you will not bend them so often. For now, I'd just keep fixing them when they bend. If that bothers you, get a rock ring or a bashguard.
 

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