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Been riding in Bend area periodically now for the last couple years and what the heck has happened trail etiquette? I remember coming across a few unfamiliar riders each ride in Phil's, but nothing has been as crazy as this past weekend on Maston. It must've been a dozen times this past weekend that we had approaching parties either ride 10 feet all the trail to pass or just not yield to climbing riders and shoulder past anyways. You've got some nice trails down there, but man, they ain't gonna last long if this trend keeps up.
 

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Been riding in Bend area periodically now for the last couple years and what the heck has happened trail etiquette? I remember coming across a few unfamiliar riders each ride in Phil's, but nothing has been as crazy as this past weekend on Maston. It must've been a dozen times this past weekend that we had approaching parties either ride 10 feet all the trail to pass or just not yield to climbing riders and shoulder past anyways. You've got some nice trails down there, but man, they ain't gonna last long if this trend keeps up.
Good question, we have the same thing with drivers, agro and inconsiderate. Was never a problem going back 5-10 yrs, but it's a thing now.

With the growth of Bend I'm guessing lots of newish riders and the fact that the weather has been agreeable as of late.

I feel your pain....
 

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Sometimes it is hard to tell which who is going uphill in Bend, those trails don't have real steep grades and are kind of rolling. I also think so many riders are like me and yield to the downhill rider (cause that is the way it should be) that maybe people are getting confused about who yields to who.
 

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Sometimes it is hard to tell which who is going uphill in Bend, those trails don't have real steep grades and are kind of rolling. I also think so many riders are like me and yield to the downhill rider (cause that is the way it should be) that maybe people are getting confused about who yields to who.
That. There's legal right of way (up hill) and hoping everyone enjoys the good part (yielding to DH traffic), which is generally much appreciated. The DH rider just needs to be able to slow down if they need to and not expect it.
 

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I just yield to everyone* on non-directional trails, and only ride the correct direction on directional trails. I've yielded to some pros in both directions on Mrazek in a single day as they go up and down and up and down and up...

* Unless it's really wide. For example, I rode around someone on Tumalo Creek last fall, I was heading down and the other rider was heading up but ... that trail is 4ft wide, easy, rather flat, and... who cares anyway? I guess the other rider did based on the face I got. Meh.
 

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I blame Californians, but seriously, an influx of newbies who don't get it causes too many failures to yield or running off traill and doing damage. I see it more on better known and more heavily used trails like Phil's I was at Horse Butte the week before last and everyone was good about yielding to uphill and staying on track. Maston is interesting for me because I always ride the loop clockwise unlike the majority.
 

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Sometimes it is hard to tell which who is going uphill in Bend, those trails don't have real steep grades and are kind of rolling. I also think so many riders are like me and yield to the downhill rider (cause that is the way it should be) that maybe people are getting confused about who yields to who.
Last time I was at Phil's there were several riders coming downhill that did'nt even slow dow let alone yield. If people keep yielding to the downhill riders they'll think it's the norm. It's a helluva lot easier to resume downhill than to restart on a steep climb.

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I find it is easier to resume on the uphill. When you resume on the downhill you have to usually pedal back uphill a ways so you can get speed to resume the fun. But I also end up yielding to pretty much everyone it seems like. Popular MTB specific places really should switch how the yield works. Shoot a place as crowded as Phils every trail should probably be directional.
 

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The history of yielding to the uphill traffic goes back a long time, to before there were bicycles. It's based on the common sense reality that it's easier, (sometimes just - possible) for the downhill traffic to restart from a stop than someone (think - horse and wagon for instance) going uphill in very steep terrain. Apply this logic to trails where it's very steep and it still makes sense, no matter the means of transport.
 

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I find it is easier to resume on the uphill.
Others might not feel the same or have a similar experience to yours. When terrain is steep, I certainly don't.

When you resume on the downhill you have to usually pedal back uphill a ways so you can get speed to resume the fun.
I believe you used the word "you" when you meant to use the word "I" as (I assume) you were speaking about your own experience. Again, yours seems to be different than mine. Whenever I'm starting on a downhill, I just go.

But I also end up yielding to pretty much everyone it seems like. Popular MTB specific places really should switch how the yield works. Shoot a place as crowded as Phils every trail should probably be directional.
Pretty much agree with you on this. At mountain bike specific riding areas I usually yield to downhill riders because I like to keep my run going so I want to let others do likewise. But it's a slippery slope, no pun intended. I don't want to alter the trail etiquette status quo and inconsistent behavior indeed erodes it.

I hope all trail users -- hikers, equestrians, mountain bikers, e-bikers, off-road skateboarders and future trail users yet to be imagined will continue to respect the trail etiquette rule that's been in place for eons -- uphill traffic has the right of way. Not every (any) other trail user group is sensitive to (nor should have to be sensitive to) the preferences of mountain bikers or any other individual trail user group. Nor should they should have to. If we don't continue to respect the uphill right of way rule -- as everyone else does -- then we're the problem.
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I see the other side of the coin no doubt. The only thing I disagree on is I don't think there is anything wrong with me stepping aside for the downhill rider when I am going uphill, I know who is supposed to yield to who and if I choose to step off the trail to let others by when I technically have the right-of-way that is not causing anyone harm. Also when passing other user groups uphill-downhill is irrelevant anyway as MTB is technically supposed to yield to everyone. Though generally when on popular trails I notice most hikers step way off to the side and give an enthusiastic come on through wave.
 

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I see the other side of the coin no doubt. The only thing I disagree on is I don't think there is anything wrong with me stepping aside for the downhill rider when I am going uphill, I know who is supposed to yield to who and if I choose to step off the trail to let others by when I technically have the right-of-way that is not causing anyone harm. Also when passing other user groups uphill-downhill is irrelevant anyway as MTB is technically supposed to yield to everyone. Though generally when on popular trails I notice most hikers step way off to the side and give an enthusiastic come on through wave.
I'm with you. To the point of admitting I'm confused about the "yield to" triangle that has mountain bikers yielding to everyone. I mean I get that on flat trails but wonder if the downhill-yields-to-uphill thing supersedes the right-of-way-triangle rule. What if I'm having the most amazing ride of my life cleaning some impossible to climb steep uphill section and a hiker feels they'd prefer to play their you-yield-to-me trump card? So far no one ever has; I'll continue to hope they won't.

I often feel a tinge of guilt when sharing trails with hikers and they step off to let me through, though I've pretty much gotten over this. I never expect them to step off nor ask them to, usually they just do it and I always thank them profusely, smile and offer some friendly comment like what a nice trail it is or whatever. I'm grateful that they step off and somehow want them to know that I know that they have the right of way and that they are being gracious. But the encounter typically doesn't go that deep.
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I find it is easier to resume on the uphill. When you resume on the downhill you have to usually pedal back uphill a ways so you can get speed to resume the fun. But I also end up yielding to pretty much everyone it seems like. Popular MTB specific places really should switch how the yield works. Shoot a place as crowded as Phils every trail should probably be directional.
This^^^ Is partially the reason I don't ride in Bend anymore.

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IMO the right of way issue has gotten worse with the rise in popularity of shuttling riders to the higher elevations. I'm old school and enjoy the climb up as much as the ride down.
Yep, the majority of the issues I've had involve trains of people not yielding on rental bikes. It's pretty clear they were shuttled. Not sure if its a "I paid for this so I'm not yielding" mentality or ignorance, but it is annoying and is becoming more frequent.
 

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Yep, the majority of the issues I've had involve trains of people not yielding on rental bikes. It's pretty clear they were shuttled. Not sure if its a "I paid for this so I'm not yielding" mentality or ignorance, but it is annoying and is becoming more frequent.
Can't stop a train, yo! Get the hell out of the way!
 

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I will always yield to the downhill rider because from my perspective and experience it's easier and safer for the uphill rider to yield, regardless if it's "harder" to get going again. Again it's a safer choice.

It doesn't take a whole lot of speed where crashing into someone becomes a dangerous possibility and I've personally seen a rider go to the hospital in a frickn' helicopter because they hit each other so hard.

With all the discussions when this topic comes up why does no one consider that? Do people not really understand what can happen when 230lbs hits you at 22mph?

And personally, Funner to Storm King to road NF-41 should definitely be one way down with a whole new one way climbing trail going up to Wanoga.
 
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