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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive been trying to research this topic and have gotten some useful information but its very spread out throughout the internet and some of the topics have different points of views. Just wondering where I can find good solid information on dieting, exercising, training routines, etc.

Im 24 now, and between the ages of 19-21 I was very into weight lifting with the only goal being gaining muscle mass. At that point in time i was weighing in at 225 lb, 6'1 height. Unfortunately I completely stopped exercising and realize how important it is for a long and happy life. Im about 190lb right now.

Decided to pick up a xc full suspension bike. giant trance x3. well capable of what i want to do. I know with other hobbies there is always a book that everyone refers to as the "bible for ...."

What is the most helpful literature all of you have come across? books, magazines, internet databases, etc

My goal is to begin a well organized training and diet routine to see how far i can really push myself in the sport. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks

-chris
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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Xc

XC racing is an amazing thing!

I've always been pretty active in a cardio sense, but after the birth of my first kiddo, I realized I didn't have the time to continue my past hobby anymore (rock/ice/mountaineering) My weight was going up and fitness was going down. I started riding a MTB a bit to try and correct those issues. I soon realized that without a firm commitment I wouldn't really put the time in necessary to make a big change. Around Christmas time, after 4 months of riding once or twice a week, I committed to a racing series the following spring.

It really has changed my life. 4 years later, I'm still going strong and doing things I never thought possible. I'm in the shape of my life (in my 30's) and having an absolute blast. I keep learning more and getting better.

Like you, I lifted heavily, and although I don't have a typical cyclists height to weight ratio, it hasn't stopped me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
used2Bhard said:
XC racing is an amazing thing!

I've always been pretty active in a cardio sense, but after the birth of my first kiddo, I realized I didn't have the time to continue my past hobby anymore (rock/ice/mountaineering) My weight was going up and fitness was going down. I started riding a MTB a bit to try and correct those issues. I soon realized that without a firm commitment I wouldn't really put the time in necessary to make a big change. Around Christmas time, after 4 months of riding once or twice a week, I committed to a racing series the following spring.

It really has changed my life. 4 years later, I'm still going strong and doing things I never thought possible. I'm in the shape of my life (in my 30's) and having an absolute blast. I keep learning more and getting better.

Like you, I lifted heavily, and although I don't have a typical cyclists height to weight ratio, it hasn't stopped me.
Thanks for the positive reply. Very motivating. I feel the same way, ive been doing it for about 2 months now a couple times a week and its a blast. I know if i can get my fitness back to what it used to be , i would have more fun than i already am.

Some days I can go out and ride 15 miles no problem and some days, like today, after about 5 miles i feel like im gonna die. I know it has something to do with my diet and lifestyle.

Can someone confirm that this link is the correct book, the cover looks a little different then the one above but its written by the same person and same title. Maybe its just a newer edition.

http://www.target.com/Mountain-Bike...e=UTF8&index=books&rh=k:mountain friel&page=1

Cheers!
 

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Book is complicated!.... for me

I picked up Friel's book last year and attempted to do my homework. I think you will find the book to be a bit much - you really need to make a complete commitment and do your daily homework if you are going to practice what is written. I know many, many others out there have had great success with his book and swear by the info he provides. I just found it to be way to complicated for me and my ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder). If your planning on becoming a serious racer then maybe give the book a try; but, for nutrition it may not provide the info you seek. There are lots of other books that address the nutrition thing far better than Friel's. Of course you could always see a nutritionist and get the skinny on your specific needs..... Just my .01 cent
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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mtcowen said:
I picked up Friel's book last year and attempted to do my homework. I think you will find the book to be a bit much - you really need to make a complete commitment and do your daily homework if you are going to practice what is written. I know many, many others out there have had great success with his book and swear by the info he provides. I just found it to be way to complicated for me and my ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder). If your planning on becoming a serious racer then maybe give the book a try; but, for nutrition it may not provide the info you seek. There are lots of other books that address the nutrition thing far better than Friel's. Of course you could always see a nutritionist and get the skinny on your specific needs..... Just my .01 cent
I picked up that book first thing, and struggled with it my first year. Although I didn't develop or follow a weekly plan at first, it did help with basic understandings of training blocks, recovery, etc. It was really good enough for the first year, as I really just needed to ride my bike a bunch, and get my tech skills and bike fitness developed. I would read through it and start to pick up the general points. Don't get caught up in the minutia. Year 2, I started putting it together and working out a plan with the help of a coach. The results were amazing for that year.

Now a couple years of coaching down the road, I still pick up good hints here and there from that book.

I'd look at your first year as a big learning experience. Like me, you will be learning how to ride a bike and race at the same time. It wasn't a bad thing, and I did pretty good, but I certainly had frustrating moments. Blowing up mid race, rampant mechanicals due to a $1 screw, getting disheartened and wanting to quit... After I figured out the ropes the next years have been a breeze.
 

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used2Bhard said:
I picked up that book first thing, and struggled with it my first year. Although I didn't develop or follow a weekly plan at first, it did help with basic understandings of training blocks, recovery, etc. It was really good enough for the first year, as I really just needed to ride my bike a bunch, and get my tech skills and bike fitness developed. I would read through it and start to pick up the general points. Don't get caught up in the minutia.

I'd look at your first year as a big learning experience.
+1.

When you start training, you don't necessarily need to follow a highly structured plan. However, it IS important that you understand the reasoning behind the types of rides you do; the intervals, the recovery days, the tempo rides.

I'm a fairly successful racer on the road, doing pretty big hours during the warmer parts of the year, and I don't have any real training plan. I realize the physiological demands are going to be a bit different on the dirt, but in my situation, it's my bike handling abilities that will hold me back, not my lack of fitness. So, as used2Bhard said, it's important that a beginner simply gets out the door, rides a lot, and develops his technical ability. And above all, make sure that you enjoy yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thanks for the info guys...how do you guys like to ride? empty stomach? after breakfast? after lunch? before lunch? I went out around mid day today on an empty stomach and my body shut down after about 5 miles. Normally I can get to the 15 mile point without any problems. Remember im out of shape, im not over weight but my cardio is not up to par yet. Probably was just not feeling it today but damn...really makes me want to get on some sort of riding plan.

ordered the book but will have to wait till later in the week to start reading it. Till then ill just get out and start getting some hours on the bike.

What are some of your preride rituals....do any of you prefer to ride on an empty stomach? or is that just more for the fat burning goals?
 

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most of my rides are straight after work (around 630pm) and i normally won't have eaten since 230pm so i need something. a glass of muesli and milk or something similar (bread, fruit, milo) and i carry 1 banana per hour i'll be out riding. without food i may as well not bother, cos i'm the same, my body runs out of fuel (usually around the 90min mark) and then i'm in trouble...
 

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While there is lots of good info in the Training Bible and worth the read, I believe you as a beginner will get the biggest improvement just by riding a lot. The first few years you will improve greatly without much planning or structure. I would say getting all structured isn't necessary until one plateaus on there fitness level.

As far as eating I try to load up on the carbs if possible about 2 hrs before a ride. Wouldn't advise eating on an empty stomach unless you like to bonk.
 

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Somewhat echoing what others have said, the book is great, but can be a little complicated for a beginner, but as long as you get the main comcepts it should help a lot. Also as mentioned for the first few months just get on the bike, start base period, then follow the general comcepts of the book. One maybe 2 big ride a week, rest day or 2 per week, 1-2 hard days per week. Work hard, recover, repeat.

I've been riding about 2 years now, i've really came a long way...I race, but am not competitive, but that's mostly because I eat everything I see and weight about 30lbs more than I should to be mid-pack sport, and have a partially fake leg....
 

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When I started out last spring, I got the CTS mountain biking DVD and did the video workout on the trainer 3 times a week and rode the bike outside when weather allowed, as much as possible. It would have helped to understand about training/recovery, as I often went into races without enough of a taper.

Anyway, there are so many things to trip you up, each race you will learn from a mistake and hopefully correct it for the next race. Then something else happens to trip you up. Eventually, you get it all worked out and have a good race.
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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Fud

drz400sm said:
thanks for the info guys...how do you guys like to ride? empty stomach? after breakfast? after lunch? before lunch? I went out around mid day today on an empty stomach and my body shut down after about 5 miles. Normally I can get to the 15 mile point without any problems. Remember im out of shape, im not over weight but my cardio is not up to par yet. Probably was just not feeling it today but damn...really makes me want to get on some sort of riding plan.

ordered the book but will have to wait till later in the week to start reading it. Till then ill just get out and start getting some hours on the bike.

What are some of your preride rituals....do any of you prefer to ride on an empty stomach? or is that just more for the fat burning goals?
1) If I'm doing a really long ride, I'll eat a pretty good meal 1 to 2 hours before, and then take in 300-350 Cal per hour in food an liquid
2) XC Race - Breakfast 4 hours before, powerbar 2 hours before, shots/blocks/gel 45 min before, then 100Cal /hr in my drink and 150 Cal per hour in shots/blocks/gel
3) Normal training ride in AM - Small Breakfast 2 hours before then mix of gels and bars on the bike approx 300-350 per hour.
4) After work training ride - Lunch at 1:00, snack at 3:00, Bar at 5:00 on my way home, then on the bike at 6:00. Usually I eat a bar and a gel on the bike one hour into the ride.

I always make sure and get hydrated before riding. If I try and ride first thing in the AM or after drinking afternoon coffee, I'll be hosed just as bad as if I don't eat.
 

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People will give a lot of advice, but for the average person the best training program is something you'll enjoy. Get out there and ride your bike. Consistency is going to pay off regardless of what program you do, or if you don't have one at all. A beginner who has fun and rides his bike often is going to do better than someone of equal talent who sort of follows a program, doesn't have fun with it, and skips riding some days because he doesn't want to do something stupid like one-legged pedalling drills. :)
 

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I'm with ride&laugh -- enjoyable is a key.

The Joe Friel's Training Bible can be a bit owerwhelming for a newer, more recreational cyclist. Chris Carmichael's The Ultimate Ride or Lance Armstrong Performance Program would be better choices for a recreational cyclist--IMHO.

Ride On!
 
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