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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
TLDR: rear wheel rubs against seat stay on right side, when rear axle is fully seated.

So.. I 'v been on off a bike 3 years, Still have my 2007, maybe 2008 26'r santa cruz blur
Just had the bike back from a light "tune up", adjust brakes, lube cables, replace rear cassette, adjust deraeilurs.

I threw some Kenda honey badgers on 26 x 2.2 ( different than the older kendas which were a 1.9) and went for a ride (first time after hip replacement and it went awesome)

Threw the bike on the rack and noticed that the rear tire is not aligned down the middle between the two seat stays, it angled towards the right stay and rubs/ made a small indent ( 1mm) into it

The rim is not bent as constant contact is made when rotating
I adjusted the rim to make sure it was fully seated in the dropouts. but it still rubs, almost as if the left seat stay is shorter than the other making the tire angle to the right, and rub on the stay

If I drop the axle on the right side say 1-2 mm on the dropout I can get the tire to be in the middle between the seat stays with no rubbing

It has never done this to my knowledge

Is this appropriate to rub( doubt it)? is adjusting the dropouts and tightening the quick release the solution? or is there a better way to correct this? ( and not $$$$, i could deal with $ but not $$$)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
the honey badger i do know is a more rounder profile than the previous kenda nevagals so it is possible the issue was there but not as detectable ( I am a ride it and put away wet sort of guy, trying to get out of that habit)
 

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Love Kenda Nevegal's, using them for years and still have 'em on 3 of 4 bikes. But the one thing to watch for, at least as I experienced with Nevegals, was making sure the beads set. They can be tight, depending on the rim. I always mount them with a little soapy water on the bead. They always make a confirming pop when the beads set. It isn't unusual for one side to set, while other other side was just a hair off. Still held air, but oddly, the tire would extend at the knobs just a bit further out on that side, although not usually constant all the way around the hoop. And I did the same as you at one point (adjusted at the skewer). But once the bead is set, no issues. This is with Nevegal 2.35's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
check the dish of the wheel. could have been off before, but the wider tire made it obvious
not sure how to check "dish" any primers??
I googled dishing and essentially it entails loosening the spokes on the cassette side and tightening on the other side ( for my issue) correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Love Kenda Nevegal's, using them for years and still have 'em on 3 of 4 bikes. But the one thing to watch for, at least as I experienced with Nevegals, was making sure the beads set. They can be tight, depending on the rim. I always mount them with a little soapy water on the bead. They always make a confirming pop when the beads set. It isn't unusual for one side to set, while other other side was just a hair off. Still held air, but oddly, the tire would extend at the knobs just a bit further out on that side, although not usually constant all the way around the hoop. And I did the same as you at one point (adjusted at the skewer). But once the bead is set, no issues. This is with Nevegal 2.35's.
So you're saying to make sure the bead set, because if it didn't then it might make the tire bulge out correct?
 

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not sure how to check "dish" any primers??
I googled dishing and essentially it entails loosening the spokes on the cassette side and tightening on the other side ( for my issue) correct?
you CHECK a wheel's dish with either a dishing tool or a truing stand. you're simply ensuring that the wheel itself is centered. if not, easy fix. if it's centered, then your problem lies elsewhere.

you CHANGE the dish of a wheel by adjusting the spoke nipples.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
you CHECK a wheel's dish with either a dishing tool or a truing stand. you're simply ensuring that the wheel itself is centered. if not, easy fix. if it's centered, then your problem lies elsewhere.

you CHANGE the dish of a wheel by adjusting the spoke nipples.
perfect.. thanks! need to get the dishing tool then..... amazon here I come.

think its ok to ride tomorrow with adjusting the quick release levers to ensure a centered rim? or will that adjustment blow out the first real bump I hit ( I aint a dainty 140lb fellow you know)
 

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perfect.. thanks! need to get the dishing tool then..... amazon here I come.

think its ok to ride tomorrow with adjusting the quick release levers to ensure a centered rim? or will that adjustment blow out the first real bump I hit ( I aint a dainty 140lb fellow you know)
wheel dish is an advanced area of do it yourselfing. Might wanna go to bike shop
I agree with this.

just take it to a shop and ask them to check it. probably won't cost a dime for them to look at it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
wheel dish is an advanced area of do it yourselfing. Might wanna go to bike shop
gave them a ring, about 25$.. looks easy on you tube but..... so did replacing the ujoints on my driveshaft. and well that's another story. just believe me if the youtube is 20 mins long it will definitely take longer than that!

Thks guys appreciate the insight
 

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Loosen the cluster side spokes 1/4 turn with a 3 sided spoke wrench the correct size for your spokes. Tighten the brake side spokes 1/4 turn. Spin the wheel using the seat stays as a guide. Repeat as necessary.
 

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Loosen the cluster side spokes 1/4 turn with a 3 sided spoke wrench the correct size for your spokes. Tighten the brake side spokes 1/4 turn. Spin the wheel using the seat stays as a guide. Repeat as necessary.
Please make sure the dish really is off before messing with it. It may sound easy in concept, but if you mess up it can get difficult to fix. For example as your going around loosening spoke, you reach to grab your beer and knocknit over, or the phone rings, or the girfriend comes over for a kiss or whatever and you lose track of where you were. Now youre messed up.
Dish also isnt something that goes out of adjustment, it would have been off from the start. But as mentioned maybe it was off before but never noticed until you got wider tires.
Another possibility is bent axle, but thats pretty rare and would also usually manifest bad shifting. Frame couod be bent too. But anyway, shop can tell u quck if dish is off.
 

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Home spun dish gauge courtesy of FBinNY:

Support the rim on a bench with 3 soup cans spaced evenly. Stack Quarter Dollars from the bench to the axle. Invert rim to determine variance in dish.

Works so well I haven't yet bought a dish guage yet and have built 4 wheelsets!
 
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