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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started riding in February this year and I am interested in doing the Shenandoah 100 on September 2010. I'm looking for a training plan for beginners to complete a 100 mile race. Is doing a 100 mile Mountain Bike race doable after only riding a little over a year? Here is some background info:
- I am 38 years old - 5' 8" / 175 lbs.
- My longest ride so far has been 45 miles on the road on my hardtail mountain bike.
- My longest ride on trails has been 20 miles.
- I have limited amount of time to train (8-10 hours/week)

One more question:
- How tough is it to do 100 miles on a 26" hardtail (2009 Trek 6000)?
 

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I attempted the SM100 in 2008. I bailed at CP4. I finished it this year. 14 hours 10 mins. This year I picked up a road bike and did a fair bit of training on it. The 100 was my first real century. We did have a few weekends where we rode big mileage days back to back.

One thing I can tell you is to get down there and ride some of the bigger hills....Hankey over to Dowells to Braileys Pond is a good 40 mile loop you could add Wolf into that and get about 1/2 the course in. Those hills are a monster if you haven't ridden them before. I did it in 2008 and was totally overwhelmed by the length of Hankey it killed me.

Another thing is go climb climb climb. We are doing alot of training on skyline this year for this thing.

Good luck to you sir.
 

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I think that will be plenty of time to train. Last year was my first year racing mountian bikes and ended up squeezing 4 Hundred milers in without killing/injuring myself. I had a lot of luck with lwcoaching.com. I used Lynda's endurance winter base plan and her 100 mile personal best plan. You might have to extend your training time a few weeks preceeding the race to get a long ride in but its definately doable. Best money ive spent yet!

As for the 26' hard tail-I say go for it and dont let anyone make you feel your bike is inferior. If you want to plushen the ride up a bit maybe you could throw on a high volume tire and run the pressure a bit lower. Good luck!
 

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silves1171 said:
I started riding in February this year and I am interested in doing the Shenandoah 100 on September 2010. I'm looking for a training plan for beginners to complete a 100 mile race. Is doing a 100 mile Mountain Bike race doable after only riding a little over a year? Here is some background info:
- I am 38 years old - 5' 8" / 175 lbs.
- My longest ride so far has been 45 miles on the road on my hardtail mountain bike.
- My longest ride on trails has been 20 miles.
- I have limited amount of time to train (8-10 hours/week)

One more question:
- How tough is it to do 100 miles on a 26" hardtail (2009 Trek 6000)?
Ride/train as much as you can in the next three months, go out and ride 50 miles on your typical trails on your Trek 6000, and you can probably answer all your questions yourself at that time.
 

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ChrisJ said:
I attempted the SM100 in 2008. I bailed at CP4. I finished it this year. 14 hours 10 mins. This year I picked up a road bike and did a fair bit of training on it. The 100 was my first real century. We did have a few weekends where we rode big mileage days back to back.

One thing I can tell you is to get down there and ride some of the bigger hills....Hankey over to Dowells to Braileys Pond is a good 40 mile loop you could add Wolf into that and get about 1/2 the course in. Those hills are a monster if you haven't ridden them before. I did it in 2008 and was totally overwhelmed by the length of Hankey it killed me.

Another thing is go climb climb climb. We are doing alot of training on skyline this year for this thing.

Good luck to you sir.
Where can one get more info on the trails you talked about above? I'm also interested in doing the SM100 as my first 100 miler this year and would love to come up there and ride some over the summer. I'm near Asheville, NC so plenty of big hills to ride in Pisgah, but I'd like to ride some of what's in the race too.
 

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Great to have a goal!

silves1171 said:
I started riding in February this year and I am interested in doing the Shenandoah 100 on September 2010. I'm looking for a training plan for beginners to complete a 100 mile race. Is doing a 100 mile Mountain Bike race doable after only riding a little over a year? Here is some background info:
- I am 38 years old - 5' 8" / 175 lbs.
- My longest ride so far has been 45 miles on the road on my hardtail mountain bike.
- My longest ride on trails has been 20 miles.
- I have limited amount of time to train (8-10 hours/week)

One more question:
- How tough is it to do 100 miles on a 26" hardtail (2009 Trek 6000)?
Keep in mind that building up a solid endurance base takes longer than anything else. You didn't say if you're 38 years old and have been a couch potato for 20 years, or if you've been active in other sports and already have good endurance. Are you 175 pounds of muscle or flab? If the former, you should be OK if you start now - 8-10 hours a week of training is not bad for a weekend warrier and you can do a lot with it if you're starting with a good fitness base.

If the latter, get a doctor's OK first. It may still be doable, but you'll for sure have a tougher time. It's great to have a stretch goal, but you may want to have a shorter term goal that will let you know how you're progressing. Not trying to be negative at all, but also don't want you to have a bad experience!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
chuckred said:
Keep in mind that building up a solid endurance base takes longer than anything else. You didn't say if you're 38 years old and have been a couch potato for 20 years, or if you've been active in other sports and already have good endurance. Are you 175 pounds of muscle or flab? If the former, you should be OK if you start now - 8-10 hours a week of training is not bad for a weekend warrier and you can do a lot with it if you're starting with a good fitness base.

If the latter, get a doctor's OK first. It may still be doable, but you'll for sure have a tougher time. It's great to have a stretch goal, but you may want to have a shorter term goal that will let you know how you're progressing. Not trying to be negative at all, but also don't want you to have a bad experience!
Prior to cycling I was a couch potato. I've been riding 70-100 miles per week for the past couple months, and am in the process of building my base. Unfortunately the weather in Northern Virginia hasn't been cooperating lately, and it's been hard to get out and ride. I don't have a trainer, but in occasions I use an elliptical machine.

As for short term goals, other than short races throughout the year I want to try a road century prior to the SM100 (maybe in April or May).
 

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silves1171 said:
Prior to cycling I was a couch potato. I've been riding 70-100 miles per week for the past couple months, and am in the process of building my base. Unfortunately the weather in Northern Virginia hasn't been cooperating lately, and it's been hard to get out and ride. I don't have a trainer, but in occasions I use an elliptical machine.

As for short term goals, other than short races throughout the year I want to try a road century prior to the SM100 (maybe in April or May).
There is often a bit of hesitancy on the forum to squash people's ambitions, especially if they're new to mtb riding. But, in this case truthfulness may save you a lot of pain/anguish. A mid-30's couch potato in his second full year of mtb riding, with especially no more riding than you did in your first year, would be looking at a very high probability of failure at least, or injury at worst, by trying to bite off something like the SM100 in your second year.

If you were asking if it was possible to train for/complete a road century in one year, I'd tell you that you could do it w/ about 3 months of training. An mtb century is different. Much more difficult and many more things that can go wrong. In some sense the advice that you see for running applies, in that there is a limit to how much you should increase your mileage without hurting yourself. If you asked us if you could go from couch potato to running a marathon in one year, after having run no more than 10-15 miles a week in your first year of running, no one would say it's a good idea. The top endurance racers in the country can barely break 7 hours at the SM 100 (and that's assuming optimal conditions) and most experienced racers are taking between 8 to 11 hours. A first-timer would likely take over 12 to 14 hours to finish the ride.

I'm not saying you can't do it, or that others in similar situations haven't done it, but the odds are very much against you. Have you considered shooting for something a bit easier/shorter for a more realistic goal for this year? As a suggestion, perhaps you could find a 12 hour, or even 6 hour mtb event in your area that runs multiple laps. Go give it a try and see just how difficult it is to spend that much time riding your bike offroad. At least if it's a multi-lap event, you can stop whenever appropriate w/out having to be rescued from some distant point.
 

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I did my first 100 (cohutta) in a similar position. I had an ill fitted HT and only had limited training time.

In retrospect I would go to lwcoaching.com and get the first timers plan. You have limited time to train make your training count.
 

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[/QUOTE] In retrospect I would go to lwcoaching.com and get the first timers plan. You have limited time to train make your training count.[/QUOTE]

I 2nd that! Granted, I wasn't a beginner, but her $99, 12week program helped me to PR last year!! It's a great investment and you'll gain valuable insight into the endurance training world! Good luck!

Brent
 
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