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Bead blow out, warranty?

1047 Views 14 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  Harold
I had been riding my new bike for about a month, but I left my dorm for Thanksgiving break. When I get back I open my door to proudly show my dad my new bike, but I find this.
Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Tire Wheel Crankset Bicycle frame

What do yall think caused this and might it be covered under warranty?

Also any good low rolling resistance front tires for road and trails recommendations? I have taken this as a sign to go tubeless.
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That definitely looks like a tire failure. I would try and warranty it.
Looks like a warranty to me unless you had 60 psi there.
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If you feel you have a warranty issue with Vee Tire Co. tires supplied and fitted to a bicycle purchased by yourself as the first owner, warranty claims will need to be taken up with the point of purchase I.E the physical store the bicycle was purchased from, website or distributor. Claims on original equipment Vee Tire Co. tires will be evaluated by the store, e-commerce portal or distributor on an individual basis.
Note that most of the bicycle brands we work with use tires exclusively made for them. This may include a specific color, tread compound, or casing structure. In these cases, we cannot replace the tire with the exact same tire. All replacements will come from our standard aftermarket tire line
HTH
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Looks like a warranty to me unless you had 60 psi there.
45psi when max says 50psi. I'm incredibly thankful this didn't happen while I was riding.
45psi when max says 50psi. I'm incredibly thankful this didn't happen while I was riding.

It does seem like a warranty deal but 45psi is way too much pressure for that tire under any circumstance imo. The max psi number on the sidewall is only saying that if you put any more in the tire might blow off the rim. 30 would be about the highest I'd go for the road or really smooth dirt.
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It does seem like a warranty deal but 45psi is way too much pressure for that tire under any circumstance imo. The max psi number on the sidewall is only saying that if you put any more in the tire might blow off the rim. 30 would be about the highest I'd go for the road or really smooth dirt.
I'm surprised the guy at the bike shop didn't say anything when I asked him to do it then, smh. New bike, I've never had tire that thiccccc before
I can't see if the strip that's peeled off is the actual bead, or if it's just a strip of fabric. If just a strip of fabric, then I don't think there's any worry here. That bead probably slipped off the rim pretty slowly. It may not have been well-seated to begin with. If the strip contains the actual bead, then yeah, that's a problem.

Either way, yeah, 45psi is way too high for a mountain bike. There's no reason to ever put a mtb tire that high. These days, you also have to consider the max pressure rating of the rim. It doesn't always match the max pressure of the tire. Those tend to vary a great deal depending on the shape of the bead seat (hooked vs. hookless), width of the rim, and even brand.

This is a chart that's useful to pull out in cases like this. My last wheelset was a build and I used DT Swiss alu rims. This is a page from the manual for those rims. There's a lot of information here to digest. It covers recommended tire widths for different rim widths. If you note the two columns at the far right, it also provides max tire pressures for each case. Narrower tires (and rims) have a higher max pressure than wider ones. Keep in mind these are pretty high quality hooked rims. YMMV with other rim brands/models.

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I can't see if the strip that's peeled off is the actual bead, or if it's just a strip of fabric. If just a strip of fabric, then I don't think there's any worry here. That bead probably slipped off the rim pretty slowly. It may not have been well-seated to begin with. If the strip contains the actual bead, then yeah, that's a problem.

Either way, yeah, 45psi is way too high for a mountain bike. There's no reason to ever put a mtb tire that high. These days, you also have to consider the max pressure rating of the rim. It doesn't always match the max pressure of the tire. Those tend to vary a great deal depending on the shape of the bead seat (hooked vs. hookless), width of the rim, and even brand.

This is a chart that's useful to pull out in cases like this. My last wheelset was a build and I used DT Swiss alu rims. This is a page from the manual for those rims. There's a lot of information here to digest. It covers recommended tire widths for different rim widths. If you note the two columns at the far right, it also provides max tire pressures for each case. Narrower tires (and rims) have a higher max pressure than wider ones. Keep in mind these are pretty high quality hooked rims. YMMV with other rim brands/models.

View attachment 1959213
Good looks! This is very useful! Thank you so much for the help. I used to ride 2.2" in a 21mm rim so I guess that's why 50psi felt pretty normal for me, but I guess new bike, new things to learn. Expensive way to learn, but I prefer tubeless anyway.I'm pretty sure the peice that came off contains the bead or at least part of it.
Try to warranty it. Be aware that rims have max pressures too. They are often lower than the max pressures on tires.
Good looks! This is very useful! Thank you so much for the help. I used to ride 2.2" in a 21mm rim so I guess that's why 50psi felt pretty normal for me, but I guess new bike, new things to learn. Expensive way to learn, but I prefer tubeless anyway.I'm pretty sure the peice that came off contains the bead or at least part of it.
The rule I follow with tires is "if in doubt, let it out". The tire isn't doing its job if it can't deform to the terrain. It's faster when it does that. It can't deform to the terrain if the pressure is too high. Might as well just run a solid rubber tire at that point, eh? Things that tell you your pressure is too low include pinch flats (obviously), rim strikes (tire inserts can help with this, mostly for tubeless, though), and tire squirm (this should be the first indication, esp with larger tires).

50 psi even in a 2.2 tire on a 21mm rim is far too high for riding. Back when that's what I was riding (26er days), I was around 30psi and even that was probably higher than needed for my weight. But that was back when everybody used too much air pressure to avoid pinch flatting. With today's better tires, even with tubes, pinch flatting is less of a risk.

The specifics will depend on your riding weight (you plus gear) and the specific tires you have (specifically how stiff the casings are), but I'm using 29x2.6 tires on my hardtail at about 12psi F, 17psi R. The tires I'm using have fairly stout and supportive sidewalls. My back tire has an insert in it to protect from the occasional rim strike because 17psi is really pushing the tire pressure limit. I haven't tried going lower up front, but tire squirm up front can result in bigger problems than in the rear, so I'm not going to push it.
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The rule I follow with tires is "if in doubt, let it out". The tire isn't doing its job if it can't deform to the terrain. It's faster when it does that. It can't deform to the terrain if the pressure is too high. Might as well just run a solid rubber tire at that point, eh? Things that tell you your pressure is too low include pinch flats (obviously), rim strikes (tire inserts can help with this, mostly for tubeless, though), and tire squirm (this should be the first indication, esp with larger tires).

50 psi even in a 2.2 tire on a 21mm rim is far too high for riding. Back when that's what I was riding (26er days), I was around 30psi and even that was probably higher than needed for my weight. But that was back when everybody used too much air pressure to avoid pinch flatting. With today's better tires, even with tubes, pinch flatting is less of a risk.

The specifics will depend on your riding weight (you plus gear) and the specific tires you have (specifically how stiff the casings are), but I'm using 29x2.6 tires on my hardtail at about 12psi F, 17psi R. The tires I'm using have fairly stout and supportive sidewalls. My back tire has an insert in it to protect from the occasional rim strike because 17psi is really pushing the tire pressure limit. I haven't tried going lower up front, but tire squirm up front can result in bigger problems than in the rear, so I'm not going to push it.
50psi seemed to work great on the old bike, I only hit trails on occasion and when I did I'd drop down to ~20-25psi. I do a lot of tarmac riding(up to 40 mile round trip) since I'm a college student and this bike is my only transportation. So what do you think is good for the tarmac(it's now cold in Michigan so I won't be shreading till March)? I know I should have a road bike, but I like to shread on occasion and space in my dorm is severely limited.
50psi seemed to work great on the old bike, I only hit trails on occasion and when I did I'd drop down to ~20-25psi. I do a lot of tarmac riding(up to 40 mile round trip) since I'm a college student and this bike is my only transportation. So what do you think is good for the tarmac(it's now cold in Michigan so I won't be shreading till March)? I know I should have a road bike, but I like to shread on occasion and space in my dorm is severely limited.
get yourself a 2nd wheelset so you can have a commute wheel/tire combo and a mtb one.

No way in hell would I want to do that much pavement riding on 2.6" knobbies. ugh.
get yourself a 2nd wheelset so you can have a commute wheel/tire combo and a mtb one.

No way in hell would I want to do that much pavement riding on 2.6" knobbies. ugh.
I don't know if second wheelset is in the budget tbh. The prices I'm seeing are pretty scary(new cassette, front chainring, chain, rims, hubs, and tires add up pretty quickly, but these are purchases I dream of doing when I have the money), plus I tend to take ~shortcuts~ that'll take me over some pretty rough terrain as part of my commute/errands. I'm still young, a Lil bit of extra fitness training is still doable, my legs weren't enjoying the change to the 29"x2.6" knobby tires at first, but I think I'm getting used to it. However, I do need to figure out a good pressure for my 32mm rims.

Once again, thank you for all your help Harold!
you could find a used OEM wheelset for a pretty respectable price. cheap tires for the commute. you'd need a cassette and brake rotor, though. that's it. no need for a new chain/chainring. no need to get fancy with the wheel quality. flog the cheap stuff on your commute, and save your mtb tires for dedicated trail riding. decent mtb tires are expensive enough that burning through a few sets on pavement might convince you that a 2nd wheelset is a wise idea. You don't have to go full roadie with it. but some narrower rims suitable for multi-surface commute-worthy tires would save you money in the long run (mostly on tire wear).

it can be done for cheap on a college student budget if you shop wisely.

I built a whole singlespeed bike when I was in college for maybe $200. lots of castoff parts, used stuff, etc. part of that $200 was labor for the shop to install the headset and bb because I didn't have the tools I have now. sold that bike years later (to a college student, interestingly enough) after using it for a lot of commute/town duty for more than I spent to build it up.
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