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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really really hate my TALAS now. Apart from not reaching full travel despite switching to a 2.5wt oil (150lbs rider) , the excessive stiction and low small bump compliance are starting to irritate me. :madmax:

I will esperiment with a couple of different solutions to eliminate friction, then I will trash her and get a Revelation.

Option 1: lubricate the stanchions with fork oil (likely to only last for a couple hours), or Prep-M grease
Option 2 : lubricate with Finish line stanchion lube (difficult to get and quite expensive)
Option 3: remove the foam rings and replace with hand-cut, tighter-fitting rings. I have noticed that the original rings stretched a bit, so they no longer lubricate the entire stanchion circumference.
Option 4:since switching to a lighter oil did not bring any noticeable benefit in terms of travel usage, I could go back to the original 8.5wt that hopefully would leave a thicker film over the fork bushing.
Option 5: avoid to waste time, sell the Talas and immediately get a 2009 Revelation

What would you do? Thanks!
 

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The Ancient One
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Ausable said:
I really really hate my TALAS now. Apart from not reaching full travel despite switching to a 2.5wt oil (150lbs rider) , the excessive stiction and low small bump compliance are starting to irritate me. :madmax:

I will esperiment with a couple of different solutions to eliminate friction, then I will trash her and get a Revelation.

Option 1: lubricate the stanchions with fork oil (likely to only last for a couple hours), or Prep-M grease
Option 2 : lubricate with Finish line stanchion lube (difficult to get and quite expensive)
Option 3: remove the foam rings and replace with hand-cut, tighter-fitting rings. I have noticed that the original rings stretched a bit, so they no longer lubricate the entire stanchion circumference.
Option 4:since switching to a lighter oil did not bring any noticeable benefit in terms of travel usage, I could go back to the original 8.5wt that hopefully would leave a thicker film over the fork bushing.
Option 5: avoid to waste time, sell the Talas and immediately get a 2009 Revelation

What would you do? Thanks!
I have a TALAS and a Revelation and prefer the TALAS.

I lubricate with Finish Line for almost every ride. It's not really that expensive because the little bottle lasts a very long time. You can get it quickly here: http://www.enduroforkseals.com/id79.html

It also helps some to turn the bike upside down for a while before each ride to get oil up into the rings.
 

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+ 1 on turning the bike upside down before riding.

Also, I've pulled back the dust wipers and squirted as much suspension oil as I could into the gap between the wipers and the oil seal, and that helped a ton. I run an enduro seal kit, so I can do this. I'm not sure how well it would work with stock seals (no second oil seal to trap the oil), but it might be worth a shot.

It sounds like you've had the fork apart enough to check the oil levels, but if not, you should definitely do that. Your air chamber oil (float fluid) might have disappeared. When I took one of mine apart about six months after buying it used (supposedly with a recent rebuild), it was pretty close to dry.

Another alternative I've heard to stanchion lube is anything with teflon. I personally use Tri-Flow. I just spray it on and let it dry for a bit, then wipe off any excess, and it seems to help. I've also heard silicone based lube works, but have no personal experience.

What year and model is your fork?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice, I usually turn the bike upside down before rides (or during crashes!) but havent found any noticeable benefit. I have stock seals. When the fork was new, I always found a "lube ring" at the end of the ride. I believe the fork was more compliant back then. Now that the fork is older (it's a 2006model year) the lube rings are gone, but shoudn't the old seals allow for more oil leakage?
I will definitely check the oil level on the spring side.
 

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I'm not sure how experienced you are with the innards of suspension forks, so I'm telling you this just in case. There's two different types of oil in four different areas on the spring side. Semi-bath oil goes between the outside of the stanchions and the lowers, and air piston oil lives in three chambers inside the stanchion.

The oil that you see coming up past the dust wipers is semi-bath oil. This oil is used to lubricate the bushings which guide the stanchions in the lowers. It also lubricates the dust wipers and keeps the foam rings wet, so the oil stays at the top of the fork. This slowly leaks out and/or gets contaminated over time, especially with the stock fox seals.

The second type of oil is "Float Fluid," a thick oil that is put in the air chambers in small quantities (3-5cc per chamber) to keep the piston seals lubed against the inside of the stanchions. I think this will eventually leak out into the semi-bath oil if left long enough.

If you're not seeing the oil ring any more, and you haven't checked the spring side oil levels, you may be out of or low on semi-bath oil, which can damage the bushings and/or stanchions. I'd recommend checking this very soon.

If you haven't had the spring side apart, there's a pretty good instructional video on fox's website here:

http://service.foxracingshox.com/co.../TALAS_SERVICE/talas_service_video-WTEXT.html

Instead of the $90 "IFP Tool" I, along with many others, used a simple basketball air needle. Just ask if you have any more questions. Also, I'm just basing this off of personal experience and what I've read from others on this forum. Please feel free to add to this or correct me if I'm wrong. I'm just trying to help :thumbsup:
 

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How long has it been since the last Talas cartridge rebuild? You'll get a lot of stiction from the cartridge itself if the seals are worn or lacking fresh lube. For most folks, 18-24 months is as long as you can go without needing a rebuild. If you ride a lot, it can need work every 12 months to keep the fork feeling really smooth and supple.

If the Talas cartridge needs a rebuild, you can mess with the damper oil, foam rings, and oil bath all you want...but it won't make the fork feel the way it should.

I've developed a procedure for doing a partial rebuild on the Talas cartridge without having to take the fork legs off. You still need the IFP tools, but all the work is done by removing the Talas top cap assembly along with some tricks for getting any excess lube out of the lower negative air spring assembly. It only takes about 15 minutes and I do it to all my Talas forks about every 6 months. It keeps them feeling really nice for about 3 year worth of riding and then I do a full cartridge rebuild. If I can ever find the time, I'll document the procedure.
 

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If your fork hasn't been rebuilt yet, it is probably time. Seals and bushings wear out with use. Can't tell from your posts if you've followed Fox's recommended maintenance schedle or not. You might want to consider PUSH Industries or someone else to tune your shock.
 

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The plough
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This is most likely not relevant to your situation since you seem to be an experienced rider and many fork related solutions have been presented, but in the interest of many others that will encounter this thread, there is one more thing to try.

Change your riding posture.

Weigh the fork more and ride with your elbows out. This will cause the fork to do more work, overcoming the apparent stiction and improving the small bump compliance.

V.
 

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Hey sorry to threadjack....

But I was thinking of doing an overhaul of my 07 Talas fRLC fork since I have a year of hard riding on it. I was looking at Push Industries
and they have a few options but the most basic is nearly $150 with their fancy job at $250.

http://www.pushindustries.com/services.php?serv_page=Fox Air Forks&title=Fox Air Forks

Is it worth it? Does anyone know how much Fox charges to do a refreshing? I'm not really too hot on spending that much money but if its really that much better maybe it would be a nice upgrade??

Thanks!
 
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