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Discussion Starter #1
Like the packing list thread, perhaps this should be a sticky too?

Do folks have a list of basic upgrades and add-ons that they suggest newbies make to a mountain bike before they hit the trail ?

Chainstay protectors, chain guards, etc...

Appologies if this has already been done.
 

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I have an old Gt Timberline(96) that I love everything about except it has no front suspension.Does anyone know if modern forks will work on this bike?
 

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CIA said:
Like the packing list thread, perhaps this should be a sticky too?

Do folks have a list of basic upgrades and add-ons that they suggest newbies make to a mountain bike before they hit the trail ?

Chainstay protectors, chain guards, etc...

Appologies if this has already been done.
Usually the first common and effective upgrades are the tires. Good tires can make a lot of difference, and wont cost that much. Chainstay protectors would be quite desirable to prevent abrasion in that area and make the ride a little quieter.
 

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Deathcycle said:
I have an old Gt Timberline(96) that I love everything about except it has no front suspension.Does anyone know if modern forks will work on this bike?
What is the diameter of the steer tube on the fork? If the fork uses a 1" steer tube, then it might be hard to find a fork to upgrade to.
 

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Get consumables (Tires & tubes)
Get a helmet
Get a basic tool set
Get a maintenance and repair book from the book store

Ride your bike in stock configuration. Don't upgrade anything unless you have to or something breaks. If something needs replaced, then if the total of the repair is equal to or greater than 1/2 the price of the bike, get a new bike.

Hardwarz
 

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peternguyen said:
What is the diameter of the steer tube on the fork? If the fork uses a 1" steer tube, then it might be hard to find a fork to upgrade to.
Do you measure inside or ou:madman: tside diameter?
 

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Deathcycle said:
Do you measure inside or ou:madman: tside diameter?
i'm sure he means inside being that a one inch outside diameter would be tiny ;)
 

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hardwarz said:
Get consumables (Tires & tubes)
Get a helmet
Get a basic tool set
Get a maintenance and repair book from the book store

Ride your bike in stock configuration. Don't upgrade anything unless you have to or something breaks
I agree with this completely. Changing stuff on the bike before you ride it, unless you are experienced and KNOW exactly what you need/like, is pointless. You should ride your bike in it's original configuration, learn what you like and dislike, then make changes to those components. You'll be making measurable upgrades to your bike, and probably save yourself some money on stuff you didn't need.
 

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Deathcycle said:
Do you measure inside or ou:madman: tside diameter?
OUTSIDE diameter of the steer tube of the fork, not the head tube of the frame.

You also need to get close to the existing axle-to-crown measurement of the rigid fork.
 

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peternguyen said:
What is the diameter of the steer tube on the fork? If the fork uses a 1" steer tube, then it might be hard to find a fork to upgrade to.
I bought a GT Timberline in 1994. I loved that bike!
 

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gmcttr said:
OUTSIDE diameter of the steer tube of the fork, not the head tube of the frame.

You also need to get close to the existing axle-to-crown measurement of the rigid fork.
yeah i guess that would make sense, since if you measured the inside diameter of the head tube then it wouldn't fit in the head tube :madman: my bad lol
 

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Discussion Starter #16
GrampBredo said:
Ride your bike. If anything doesn't work, breaks, or doesn't fit you, replace it. Otherwise- ride it.
LOL - very helpful Gramp - so I shouldn't just chuck it over my shoulder and set off on foot then?
 

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If your bike is a piece of junk, get a new one and give the old one to someone who knows how to fix it.

Ride your bike
- if something breaks, replace it.
- if something is not comfortable, or working properly, adjust it or replace it.
- if you have money burning holes in your pockets, go spend it.
 

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Despite the fact that I’ve been riding for about 15 years now, I still tend to buy bikes that many on this forum would call “entry level”. A decent entry level bike from a bike shop will be equip with components that will generally work fine if you are using the bike for it’s intended purpose (don’t take a Hardrock to the top of the local sky resort). There will inevitably be some weak points and/or things you don’t like about the bike. This has pretty much already been said, but as you ride and discover the weaknesses either by braking parts or noticing poor areas of performance, replace what is necessary. I don’t think you can make a definitive list of parts to upgrade because different bikes come with different parts, and different riding styles require performance from difference components. I replaced the rear derailleur on my bike, but I wouldn’t suggest everyone replace his or her derailleur. My OE derailleur smacked against my chain stay all the time and took too long to shift. Your bike might have come with a derailleur that was a better match to the bike and to your riding style and if you were to run out at upgrade it, you might be wasting your money.

I suppose most everyone needs a bottle cage, and if chipped paint on the chain stay will break your heart, you’ll need a protector.
 
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