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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I figured this wouldn't be that difficult. I haven't bought a bike since I was 13 when the most important decision was mag wheels or spokes.
I'm planning to buy my first MB, and at this point all I know--er, think--is that I want hardtail and reasonable cost, like easily under 1k. I'll upgrade to a specific dream bike when I have some miles under my feet and know exactly what I want.

Anyway, that was just chitchat. What would help narrow the search right now is to know some basic requirements.
Frame size?
Wheel size? (do MBs even have different sizes, or is like BMX bikes where 1 size is standard?)
What approx weight is acceptable for singletrack, xc, general cruising around?

I'm 6'0", 240 (30 lbs to burn, the rest is linebacker stock), 32" inseam, if that helps.

Thanks, and thanks for this website. Kicks ass.
One last thing: I have the opportunity to get a K2 Attack 2.0 19" for well under MSRP; should I just get it and be done with it?
 

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Okay here are a GENERAL guide line.....

basically a starting point. The key starting point for sizing is standover height. This does not always apply to some frame designs. Dropped or sloping top tubes (top tubes that slope considerably from the head tube to they connection point on the seat tube) can make for more standover height for a given frame size. You could end up with a frame that is too large for you so standover is ONLY a starting point. So you have to do your home work. Best place to get standover measurements are from manufacturers websites. Most have geometry charts that pertain to their various frames. Standover will give you a BASIC idea of what size frames a given manufacturer makes that MIGHT fit you. Rule of thumb for standover is 2 to 4 inches LESS than your RIDING inseam, not your trousers inseam. So in your case a 28 to 30 inch (if 32" is your riding inseam) standover height would be a good starting point. From that point there are MANY other factors that go into sizing. Top tube length, stem length, crank arm length, total cockpit length, seat height and fore and aft placement, etc., and then the MOST important factor, personal preference. So don't think that standover is the endall of sizing. A good LBS should help you with fit.

As far as wheel size. There are to prevalent sizes currently being used for MTB's, 26 inch (the most common) and 29 inch. 26 inch wheels are the most common, but 29 inch wheels are becoming more popular with many people. Anyway, the choice in this respect is personal. For the begginer a 26" will give you the most versatility as far as wheels, tires etc. A 29er may well be in your future, you never know. But for know go with what you know.

As for the K2 Attack in 19" (large), it might be a bit on the large side for you. Standover is 31.9 inches on that one. Might be a little tight. But it is a full suspension bike with a traditional front triangle. Anyway, TEST RIDE THE BIKE! If it works for you and you can live with the standover being so close to the "boys" should you have to do a standover type dismount then go for it. I would suggest that you test ride a different (one size smaller) bike and see how it compares. If you can't test ride the bike then I would not recommend a purchase. At least not until you gain more experience in what exactly fits you. But if you can't test ride that specific bike then finding a K2 dealer where you can at least ride the same model would be highly recommended. And don't fall into the trap of riding the 19" and thinking it works just fine, without riding the next size smaller first! You can't tell squat from only riding the size that you THINK will fit and not riding the next smaller and next larger size. In your case I would test large and medium frames from a given manufacturer.

Bottom line is, that bike fit is quite a personal preference, but there are basics that need to be observed. I always recommend that a new rider test ride as many different bikes and sizes as possible. I also recommend that they purchase their first bike at a reputable bike shop that will help them with fit. IMHO bike fit and getting a bike that is suited for the type of riding that you intend to do is more important that just about anything else. Of course budget can be important to. But a great deal on a bike that doesn't fit and that you end up not riding because of it is a total waste of time and money. Just my 2 cents

Good Dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Excellent, thanks for the detailed response, Squash. You're right, I will probably just test/rent/demo for a few outings and see what's what.
32" was trouser inseam, actually. Shows how much I know! Learning more everytime I visit this site.
 
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