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Thank a Soldier Today
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a beginner racer. I raced twice last season. I had great fun but finished about in the middle of the beginner class each time. I want to get smart and start training right to do much better in 2009! Look at my picture from my second summer race. I'm smoked and I only did the beginner course...:eek:

I've began to read (or decipher) Friel. I'm getting it slowly. I've at least created my annual plan.

I think I'm suppose to be in my base period but I'm not sure what to do. The weekly plans are nothing but confusing.

As a beginner, I know my best improvements will come from riding as much as I can but weather and little sunlight is prohibiting me from doing so.

I've been weight training and running several times a week. I'm considering taking spinning classes. I continue to work on losing weight since I'm 200lbs and could easily stand to lose about 20lbs.

With race season 12 weeks away, I feel I'm getting behind because of my learning curve.

Anyone mind throwing me a bone? I've read several chapters from Friel and read Ned Overend's book. I just don't feel that I get what I need to be doing. Personal trainer would be nice but I certainly don't want to spend that kind of cash.

Thanks in advanced. :thumbsup:

Btw, my wife bought me a heart rate monitor for Christmas. I'm glad this thing tells time because I'm not sure what else to do with it! LOL :skep:
 

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glad to hear you've caught the bug.

it can be a little confusing at first... well actually, that never ends.

think of training as a very individual thing, what works for one rider does not for others. the most important thing is to think long-term or season long (no ONE workout will make you the best racer you can be, it is all the work and rest combined), listen to your body and RECOVERY is just as important as the training.

if you can, try to get through the friel book, it has everything you need to know starting out. if it seems too complicated, that is fine, simplify it down to 3 or 4 different of rides you like, but use the basic principals of periodization, building a base, then build and then peak. make sure to take the recovery weeks serious and don't get tempted to do a little extra, trust your schedule and program.

use the LT test in the friel book to set up Heart Rate zones.

good luck.
 

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Waiting for Godot
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there is sooo much info out there that it does get confusing with every expert calling the same things by different names they made up.


here is a short brief outline.

fall/winter. base training, do longer lower intensity workouts to help future endurence. then move into build. slowly lengthen the one or two longer rides per week by small amounts every three weeks. forth week stay at same length(your rest week).

late winter/early spring you should start ramping up intensity and interval training. i like to do strength, spin, speed and then max heart rate intervals in that progression order into the racing season.

your long rides should be tapering down and incorperate some LT workouts. a few short 5 mins ones then build into more and longer ones. i like to still do a long ride once a week at med intensity to keep it fun and really force the endurence part.

depending on when you are trying to peak, this all comes together about then with enough time to taper down and get rested before that.

i left out alot and some others do it in a different order, but that is the gist of it.
 

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Have you figure your Lactate Threshold Heart Rate (LTHR)??

LTHR:
Get on your trainer and do a 20 minute time trial at 90-95 pedal rpm. Don’t start off too hard (like a perceived level 8 out of 10) and warm up for at least 20 minutes before you start. Once you reach the 5 minute point, start the average heart rate function, and go as hard as you can (you’ve built to 10 out of 10)…..but keep the power as steady as you can.

Once you reach the 20 minute point, stop the stop watch. The average HR for these 15 minutes, will be your LTHR. Cool down for 15 minutes, easy.

Be sure to use a cool temp room (60 degrees) and be well-hydrated prior to the TT.

This is really the first step. Once you finish this, write back and let us know your results.
 

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Thank a Soldier Today
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Poncharelli said:
Have you figure your Lactate Threshold Heart Rate (LTHR)??

LTHR:
Get on your trainer and do a 20 minute time trial at 90-95 pedal rpm. Don't start off too hard (like a perceived level 8 out of 10) and warm up for at least 20 minutes before you start. Once you reach the 5 minute point, start the average heart rate function, and go as hard as you can (you've built to 10 out of 10)…..but keep the power as steady as you can.

Once you reach the 20 minute point, stop the stop watch. The average HR for these 15 minutes, will be your LTHR. Cool down for 15 minutes, easy.

Be sure to use a cool temp room (60 degrees) and be well-hydrated prior to the TT.

This is really the first step. Once you finish this, write back and let us know your results.
I will certainly do this. More to follow and big thanks for the response. :)
 

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Freil also gives an example of how to perform a LT test in his book, " Mountain Bikers Training Bible". He also has a book out on how to use your HR monitor. Its geared towards all sorts of athletes but it will definately give you a better understanding of your HR monitor. I think it's called " Total Heart Rate Training".
 
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