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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just finishing a techy climb today and I nicked a rock as I was rolling over it. It was so minor and honestly I though It had hit the bash guard.

When I got home i found this crazy amount of damage.. seems exessive... The rubber guard isint even cut all they way through.but the frame looks fucked..

Because of the nick in the rubber, I doubt giant will warranty it eh? I only had 5 rides on it.

Devastating I cannot afford to replace the frame
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
seems more like you ripped the paint off with the adhesive (which is easy to do with carbon paint jobs), clean up the area and try to get rid of the cracked paint to see if the carbon was affected
I wish that where the case. It seems rather odd to me, there are areas of the carbon that look chiped away.. but there nothing on the adhesive other then paint. Also does appear the be cracked. still odd for such a minor impact. I feel like there might have been some existing defects front he factory. But I doubt giant will see it that way
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Should be covered...

I wish, I am located in Canada. Seem to only be a thing in the us. Why they get such a sweet warranty and we don't is beyond me..
 

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Doesnt hurt to ask. But if it pushed in enough to crack the paint off, it was a good hit. Ive scraped my rubber guard pretty good ans was scared, but so far ok. The guard is more for rocks that kicked up, not against impacts from rolling over one. If youre grinding over stuff, unfortunately carbon isnt the material for it, no matter how much armor you put on it. Unless the armor is steel tubes, lol.
 

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In the event it's not warrantied, you can very easily repair this, and walk away with the following:
1) Improved bash protection at the down tube location and
2) Improved sense of ownership in that you won't ever need to kiss the manufacturer's ass to make the stuff you paid good money for, to work properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
In the event it's not warrantied, you can very easily repair this, and walk away with the following:
1) Improved bash protection at the down tube location and
2) Improved sense of ownership in that you won't ever need to kiss the manufacturer's ass to make the stuff you paid good money for, to work properly.
Thanks, that is definitely a positive way to look at this.

Not going to lie this is pretty upsetting. I know carbon is sensitive to impacts but lots of people/including my lbs told me that's is actually pretty tough... Then I lightly grazy a rock and this is the result... Bad luck?
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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In the event it's not warrantied, you can very easily repair this, and walk away with the following:
1) Improved bash protection at the down tube location and
2) Improved sense of ownership in that you won't ever need to kiss the manufacturer's ass to make the stuff you paid good money for, to work properly.
I will say that CF repair like this is not super technical, but it is very messy and very tedious (labor intensive). If the OP is game, it's a good thing to do to gain experience and it's not all that hard....but again, it is messy AF. You gotta be willing to get into it if you are going to attempt this. I've done it 3 times (different frames).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I will say that CF repair like this is not super technical, but it is very messy and very tedious (labor intensive). If the OP is game, it's a good thing to do to gain experience and it's not all that hard....but again, it is messy AF. You gotta be willing to get into it if you are going to attempt this. I've done it 3 times (different frames).
Messy I don't mind but it would obviously need to be done right. Are there any resources that outlines how to do this?

Edit* i see there are some videos on YouTube, not sure how good they are though. Or if the teqniques apply to the damaged region on my bike
 

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Messy I don't mind but it would obviously need to be done right. Are there any resources that outlines how to do this?

Edit* i see there are some videos on YouTube, not sure how good they are though. Or if the teqniques apply to the damaged region on my bike
Yes, search this site.
 

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Exactly the reason i refuse to buy a carbon frame, nope, nope, nope.....
I take a lot of flak for it but I feel the same way. I had a loaner carbon bike for 3 weeks and got a lot of rides on it with no issues. I have many friends with carbon bikes that haven't had a problem. But there are enough posts and videos like this that make me very hesitant to pay the high cost of carbon over AL frames that are really just as good, albeit slightly heavier.
 

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Exactly the reason i refuse to buy a carbon frame, nope, nope, nope.....
To the OP, do a coin test and see what that shows. I would also say, that the main reason to buy carbon is that it can be fixed and honestly can last forever. It is a pain to take apart the bike and send it to someone but it can be fixed and be as good as new.
 
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To the OP, do a coin test and see what that shows. I would also say, that the main reason to buy carbon is that it can be fixed and honestly can last forever. It is a pain to take apart the bike and send it to someone but it can be fixed and be as good as new.
So can aluminum, steel, and titanium - be fixed. Difference being that when carbon is crushed beyond a certain point it cannot be repaired. I've yet to see a handmade metal frame that suffered damage of this nature that cannot be restored to as new condition.
 

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It's carbon and it doesn't mix well with rocks. This is a common issue and I see it all the time. Some guy on a Yeti was just on here with the same issue. Barely hits a rock and the frame was cracked with a junk of carbon missing. He had to pay out of pocket to get replacement. Can it be fixed,? Yes, but it won't be as strong as the original frame.
 

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Thanks, that is definitely a positive way to look at this.

Not going to lie this is pretty upsetting. I know carbon is sensitive to impacts but lots of people/including my lbs told me that's is actually pretty tough... Then I lightly grazy a rock and this is the result... Bad luck?
ca
It's carbon and it doesn't mix well with rocks. This is a common issue and I see it all the time. Some guy on a Yeti was just on here with the same issue. Barely hits a rock and the frame was cracked with a junk of carbon missing. He had to pay out of pocket to get replacement. Can it be fixed,? Yes, but it won't be as strong as the original frame.
that spot can be fixed and made stronger than original frame
it just won't be as light as original frame

but lay up repair correctly, it can be stronger
 
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