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Is it worth it to convert my American Classics from the standard QR rear to a 10x135 thru axle? Or is it called a maxle? I've heard both. I don't mean the fully round ones like on 15mm forks but the ones that look like a skeewer that you bolt on.

I'm also seeing 12x135 now too. How do I know what will fit my frame?
 

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biketango said:
Is it worth it to convert my American Classics from the standard QR rear to a 10x135 thru axle? Or is it called a maxle? I've heard both. I don't mean the fully round ones like on 15mm forks but the ones that look like a skeewer that you bolt on.

I'm also seeing 12x135 now too. How do I know what will fit my frame?
If you run Std QR rear the 10mm through bolt will fit.

DT Swiss RWS through bolt is a good option.
 

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biketango said:
Is it worth it to convert my American Classics from the standard QR rear to a 10x135 thru axle? Or is it called a maxle? I've heard both. I don't mean the fully round ones like on 15mm forks but the ones that look like a skeewer that you bolt on.

I'm also seeing 12x135 now too. How do I know what will fit my frame?
A maxle is a similar 10mm that threads into the frame and so only works with frames designed for it. A 10x135mm thru-bolt such is the DT Swiss RWS or the Hadley use the same hub design as a 10x135 maxle but are compatible with normal frames like muzzanic said, since normal frames for QR wheels take 10mm axle in the rear dropouts. 12x135mm won't work with normal frames since the axle diameter is too large

How much of a difference it makes will depend on how flexy the rear triangle of your frame is.
 

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biketango said:
Awesome. Excellent info.
I'v got a new Alma Carbon 29er coming. Is the 10X135 upgrade worth it on a HT Carbon?
I have seen virtually zero difference in stiffness between a rear QR and rear 10mm through bolt setup. As long as you use a quality QR that clamps tight then the answer is no. Plus the 10mm through bolts are steel which is quite a bit heavier than a hollow alloy axle and 5mm steel QR.
 

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mtnbiker72 said:
I have seen virtually zero difference in stiffness between a rear QR and rear 10mm through bolt setup. As long as you use a quality QR that clamps tight then the answer is no. Plus the 10mm through bolts are steel which is quite a bit heavier than a hollow alloy axle and 5mm steel QR.
Hadley 10x135mm thru-bolt is aluminum and only 56g, i.e. lighter than most steel QR skewers, and overall the axle and end cap setup on a 10mm hub is often a touch lighter too. The downside is the increased time to remove the wheel as you need to pull out your tool.

For a hardtail, especially a carbon xc racer frame, I agree that the difference will probably be unnoticeable as the rear triangle should be quite stiff. From talking with other riders the bigger difference seems to come on some FS frames where multiple pivots can lead to the two halves of the rear triangle moving relative to each other more and the bit of extra clamping force from a thru-bolt can help tie the rear end together better. Again, that depends on the frame in question though
 

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I really think we need a few more axle/hub spacing options:madman:
Holy crap...I have 4 very nice q/r wheelsets. Looking at new frames, forks and wheels makes me dizzy ( or mad that my wheels won't work ).
And while the bike engineers are at it....let's add a few more bottom bracket standards also
 

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the mayor said:
I really think we need a few more axle/hub spacing options:madman:
Holy crap...I have 4 very nice q/r wheelsets. Looking at new frames, forks and wheels makes me dizzy ( or mad that my wheels won't work ).
And while the bike engineers are at it....let's add a few more bottom bracket standards also
It certainly can suck for compatibility, but as thru-axles have become more prevalent outside of big-hit bikes companies have gotten better about making hubs that are convertible between at least a couple of the standards.

Besides, many of these options have been around for a long time
 

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The front deal is brutal.
I have 4 wheelsets with DT 240 hubs.
There are forks with 15, 20....add in Lefty......(did I miss any?)
I had the hots for a Spec Epic......but a 142 hub with different than the rest cog spacing? Really?
I can see myself starting at ground zero with bikes and wheels with in a few years
 

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the mayor said:
The front deal is brutal.
I have 4 wheelsets with DT 240 hubs.
There are forks with 15, 20....add in Lefty......(did I miss any?)
I had the hots for a Spec Epic......but a 142 hub with different than the rest cog spacing? Really?
I can see myself starting at ground zero with bikes and wheels with in a few years
You missed 24mm (Maverick) and 25mm (Specialized dual crown fork). The 142mm standard uses the same hub spacing and cassette location (unless the specialized is different than other 142mm frames) and if you have the 240s hubs there is a conversion kit available.
 

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the mayor said:
The front deal is brutal.
I have 4 wheelsets with DT 240 hubs.
There are forks with 15, 20....add in Lefty......(did I miss any?)
I had the hots for a Spec Epic......but a 142 hub with different than the rest cog spacing? Really?
I can see myself starting at ground zero with bikes and wheels with in a few years
The Epic is compatible with all standard 142x12 hubs (which is becoming a new standard, and which many hubs are convertible too including your DT240s), Spec (as usual) just likes to tweak things and made their stock hub different. In their defense the change in hub design they used is atleast a good thing since the chainline that "the rest" use has been off for a number of years ever since crank chainlines were pushed outwards to make room for fat tires but cassette spacing was not

It's too bad more of DT's front hubs aren't convertible, but I'm sure they'll step up eventually. Thankfully there are plenty of other options for convertible front hubs.
 

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mtnbiker72 said:
You missed 24mm (Maverick) and 25mm (Specialized dual crown fork). The 142mm standard uses the same hub spacing and cassette location (unless the specialized is different than other 142mm frames) and if you have the 240s hubs there is a conversion kit available.
Oh thanks for reminding me on those 2 options:madman:
The Spec hub puts the cogs outboard more than any other ( 2 mm I think?)
It makes sense because it gives you wider hub flanges and better chain line...BUT, you either have to use all Spec hubs or dump the Spec hub and go with all other mfgr hubs if you have several wheels.

Add in that the Epic takes 142 but the hard tails take 135......and I like to have extra wheel set ups with different tires.

I wonder what Cdale will do for rear spacing if they do a f/s 29er?

And I've noticed a few frames that limit the size of your rotor ( not less than 160) and I run a 140.

I'm sure a whole new set of UN-standards will be around when it's time for new bike/bikes.
 

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10x135mm is stiffer than some qr

biketango said:
Is it worth it to convert my American Classics from the standard QR rear to a 10x135 thru axle? Or is it called a maxle? I've heard both. I don't mean the fully round ones like on 15mm forks but the ones that look like a skeewer that you bolt on.

I'm also seeing 12x135 now too. How do I know what will fit my frame?
Some QR only have 4 threads exposed, they only rest on half of the dropouts.

The 10mm bolt will go all the way through. So your dropouts will have full contact. Pretty sure my 200lbs can tell the difference in stiffness.
 

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I was looking at my Hope Pro 2 the other day and it looked like the internal hollow hub shaft sits on just very ends of the QR skewer, perhaps only a few mm's.

Wouldn't the 10mm bolt contact the entire length of the hub's internal?
 

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bonesetter2004 said:
I was looking at my Hope Pro 2 the other day and it looked like the internal hollow hub shaft sits on just very ends of the QR skewer, perhaps only a few mm's.

Wouldn't the 10mm bolt contact the entire length of the hub's internal?
The wheel isn't actually hanging on the QR skewer. Because the ends of the hub axle stick out into the dropouts the weight is transferred directly from frame to hub. The QR skewers only provide clamping force
 

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Originally Posted by bonesetter2004
I was looking at my Hope Pro 2 the other day and it looked like the internal hollow hub shaft sits on just very ends of the QR skewer, perhaps only a few mm's.

Wouldn't the 10mm bolt contact the entire length of the hub's internal?
Originally Posted by Boomn
The wheel isn't actually hanging on the QR skewer. Because the ends of the hub axle stick out into the dropouts the weight is transferred directly from frame to hub. The QR skewers only provide clamping force
Boomn is spot on here.

However going on what the others have said it is also worth remembering :

The 10mm bolt through axle (I think it is called the "Saint compatible" hub option for a Hope Pro 2) has two advantages over a quick release which may or may not be noticeable.

The first is (again as Boomn has already mentioned) when rear suspension geometry can benefit from the extra torque you can put on two steel bolts over that available from a quick release. It is better to use bolts on a 10mm axle over a 10mm QR if you want to benefit from all the through axle's advantages. I have heard negative reports about the alloy through bolt systems also. Go with hollow steel. The weight penalty is less than 100g.

The second advantage is the rigid base the hollow steel through axle provides for the alloy axle of the hub. In a QR system the hub bearings and freehub sit on the hub's alloy axle which is supported only by the dropouts at the ends of the axle. When riding, the wheel will in effect try to bend the axle in between the dropouts. Straining on the pedals will similarly try to bend the hub axle and stresses the freehub. Any flex is felt by the frame (loss of power) and the bearings (shorter lifespan). A hollow steel through axle with two bolts means that it will be much more difficult to cause flex in the first place because it provides support to the hub axle along its whole length and not just at the dropouts.

Obviously you have to be doing something with your bike that exceeds what a QR axle system can comfortably handle before you notice any improvement. This is generally the case with clydes, freeriders, dirt jumpers, downhillers and street riders which is why you often see the through axles on bikes specifically built for these activities.

It all depends on what you do.

I have both QR and 10mm x 135 hollow steel bolt-through setups.
 

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ds33gt said:
What is the DT rws thru bolt system considered? Is that compatible with anything other than dt swiss hubs
The DT Swiss RWS 135x10 thru bolt (just an oversized skewer) is compatible with any hub that has a 135x10 thru axle. King, Hope, Hadley, DT Swiss, etc.
 

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DBY said:
The DT Swiss RWS 135x10 thru bolt (just an oversized skewer) is compatible with any hub that has a 135x10 thru axle. King, Hope, Hadley, DT Swiss, etc.
Yep, however the front 9mm thru-bolt is not a standard that many companies make hubs or end caps for. There are a couple, but not too many
 
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