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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Eunorau makes a couple of AWD fatbikes, an all-rigid with 250 front and 350 rear hub motors for $1700 and a full suspension 750w front and rear hub motor for $2800 ($3100 for 2 battery option). I'm wondering how these would work in 8-12 inches fresh snow with significant climbing. Might be a practical way to groom MTB trails, but a lot of money wasted if they aren't. Any experience out there?
 

· Rocking on a Rocky
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I do not think a Rokon would be a good groomer compared to a efat in a foot of snow. Even a snow dog takes multiple passes to get a good base started.
 

· Rippin da fAt
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I would simply use a snowmobile to tow a grooming device to make a nice trail system come to be.

I do get the bike in the snow thang since I have no interest in paying 3-4 k for a permit to stand in line at Aspen and Snowmass.

Frankly, I have done grooming snowmobile trails for 30 years. That is major miles of trails that are maintained weekly. Between using a snowcat and commercial groomer and a bearcat for the narrower side trails. Equipment that was actually built to last and do a job for many seasons.
 

· This place needs an enema
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I don't get this whole biking through snow nonsense.

$1,700 will get you a decent ski setup. And it'll be way faster and lighter.
I enjoy skiing and do a lot of it.

That said, on a packed track, riding is heaps faster and in some ways more fun. Mostly just different tho.

Getting the track packed is the rub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Perhaps our strokes aren't all that different. I agree that plowing through more than four inches of fresh snow is a slog and not much fun. That is the reason for my post, to see if front and rear wheel drive would make easy work of this and in the process groom the trails for conventional fat bikes. As far as the snowmobile groomer suggestions, our single track mountain bike trails are too narrow and twisty for snowmobiles. When the snow is too deep for mountain bike trails we ride the groomed snowmobile trails. When these are out of commission I get out the cross-country skis.
 

· This place needs an enema
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I'm no stranger to mountain biking through a few inches of snow and also enjoy it, especially in the high altitude desert where I live.

But I can't think of anything more inefficient than plowing through 4" of fresh powder on top of bottomless snow. That's when the AT gear comes out: skinning up the mountain, untethered from "groomed" trails, unchained from yet another set of wheels.

Yep, different strokes.....
In that case, you haven't done anything like what the OP envisions. Entirely different sports, as unlike MTB riding as road riding.

If you lived somewhere where this was an option, and if you were open enough to new experiences, you might find that you really enjoyed it.

But those are some big ifs...
 

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But I can't think of anything more inefficient than plowing through 4" of fresh powder on top of bottomless snow.
I agree with this. I have tried it numerous times with various tire widths and low pressures and it sucks every time. It's a either a heart attack pedal or a heart attack walk of the bike through knee deep+ snow. There is nothing remotely fun about it. Especially on midwest snow that has a high moisture content. One of the reasons I stick to groomed / snow shoe packed trails.
 

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An e fattie would work - up to a point. I ride the trails I made on our property with the fat bike (not an e bike) after light snows of 1-3 inches and go over them three or four times to get them packed down. Anything deeper than that and it gets much harder and you eventually reach a point of just not doable without help from a machine. I've also done the snowshoe thing and same issue. As long as I get only those lighter snowfalls and I get out and ride after each of them, I can keep my trails packed down enough for good riding. One big snowfall and it's a different game.
 

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One of my friends cut a ton of trail last winter with him blazing the trail on snowshoes and then his buddy hitting it afterwards on an electric fat bike. Worked like a charm.
Not sure what you mean by "worked like a charm" since it's not any different than hitting it afterwards with a pedal bike.

People blaze the trails with snow shoes here and then we ride them (pedaling) with our fat bikes.
 

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I believe the advantage/effectiveness of an AWD electric version fat bike for for grooming fresh tracks would be at best marginally better than a regular pedal fat bike. And the added weight could be a liability in just as many situations. There are a lot of subtitles and finesse to riding snow and fighting with a pre-programmed drive module would be more frustrating.

My experience is riding the same twisty North East single track summer and winter. Not gradually sloped and groomed ski centers.
 
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