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I am quite interested in painting a bike frame. I have never painted a car or a bike though, so this is my first venture into such a project. I was looking at auo paint at www.houseofkolor.com and it looked like they had appropriate paints, but i do not have a sprayer or any other equipment and am not interested in purchasing any at the moment. Any suggestion on how to paint a frame well, with a lasting, quality job. I want to do this myself. Thanks,

-dM
 

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Prep and Patience

Prep and patience is the key to a good home paint job. Overzealous spraying is your enemy. My motto is like the cologne technique, "Spray and walk away."

I don't paint my own stuff anymore because I prefer the durability of powder coating.

But when I did paint my own stuff, I had decent success, but nothing ever looked pro though.

Tools/Supplies: Krylon or Rustoleum spray paint of choice, sand paper (rough and finishing grade, alcohol or any cleansing prep product, coat hanger or wires to hang frame during painting.

1. Sand off existing clear coat
2. Remove decals
3. Lightly sand exising paint to rough up texture, but do not sand down to metal.
4. Clean surface with cheap rubbing alcohol or product from store
5. Spray light coats and let dry (30min-45mins)
6. Spray second light coat and let dry for a day
7. Lightly sand to remove any kind of drippage
8. Spray third coat and allow to dry for about a day or two
9. Clear coat is optional

This was my technique in high school on my BMX bikes. Worked decently, but like I said it was never stellar. Choose a dust free and breeze free area, yet still ventilated.

You don't need a sprayer really. I always used shaker spray cans.

There is a post here recently called "Paintjob tight wad style" or something like that. Do a seach for it, the poster painted a blue frame and it looked pretty good in the thread photos.
 

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He said it.

Those are all good tips. No matter what someone else tells you, DO NOT take the old finish down to the metal. The factory primer will hold on much better than what ever you might try to use. When applying the paint be sure the paint goes on wet. Most people hold the can way too far away trying to apply a "light coat". The problem here is the paint will start drying before it hits the frame and will result in a less than glossy finish. The secret is to hold the can close, but move fast.

You don't need a spray gun. Nothing magic happens with a sray gun. The finish will depend on quality preperation, paint and application. Go here and buy your paint. They will mix any Dupont or PPG color you want in a high quality spray can.

http://www.towerpaint.com/index2.html
 

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I learned something new...

Fat Frank on that other link I posted mentioned that it's possible to your car as curing oven.

After the frame air drys and can be handled, just put it in your car and roll up all the windows.
We all know how hot a car interior can get, so that was a great tip!

Although you car may have the lingering smell of paint for several days...
 

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Go Kart Motzart said:
Those are all good tips. No matter what someone else tells you, DO NOT take the old finish down to the metal. The factory primer will hold on much better than what ever you might try to use.
Disagree. Aircraft paint remover works wonders, and will allow for a much nicer surface to work with: one would repaint an old frame due to defects, presumably.

Many primers sold in harware stores will work just fine. I have achieved results quite comparable with factory job for looks and durability.

But I would second on powder coating. Worth paying for it.
 

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Frame material?

If it's an aluminum frame you may have trouble with paint adhesion if you go to bare metal. Just rough up the paint, tack cloth and start spraying. With steel you can sand to the metal if you wish and prime. And if you don't want to or can't use a car put the frame in front of a sunny window on a hot day. The frame itself will warm up and help speed the curing.
 
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