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So I am hunting for my next bike, I want to step up from an off shelf Fisher (that has been great) to something better. I am very intrigued by Yeti and specifically the ASR 5. I know the devil is in the demo, and I have demo'd several bikes.

I am hung up on the DW Link and therefore, have been most sold on a bike from Pivot or Turner (though the price of Turner just pisses me off). I have even looked at Ibis. I want something lightweight, that climbs like a beast, with a little more travel than a standard 4 " XC bike.

I hate bikes with pedal bob and it seems to me through research and what I have read, that the DW Link bikes are the best at eliminating it. I do not want to be turning pro pedal on and off during a ride and I do not want a bike that has brake jack the way my Fisher does.

My point is that I love the looks of the Yeti's (I know that doesn't matter) and I am going to demo one this spring--it is at the top of my list. BUT, it seems that the single pivot design is a bit dated and bobs and jacks more than DW Link bikes. Is this something that can be taken care of through setup with the shock and fork, or am I completely missing something. Not bashing here, trying to get educated.

Thanks.
 

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It looks like you did a lot of reading. Not sure I can educate anymore. DW is a good suspension no doubt. I ride a Yeti but if you must have a DW than I guess the ASR 5 contender is the Ibis. Ibis mojo is a very nice "lightweight" bike.
Good luck
 

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I'd certainly ride the new asr5, although having ridden a wide variety of single pivot and multi-link (vpp, dw, vf4p, others) I can say you are up for a battle of apples and oranges. Single pivot bikes, such as the asr5 are nice and light, reliable, and well balanced. You'll certainly appreciate the simplicity of the design, quality of travel, weight savings and reliability. However, these bike are optimized heavily round shock valving and chainring position, and you'll certainly notice it.

This year at interbike I was able to try out a variety of trailbikes. I am currently riding a 2008 turner flux that is set up 120f/100r and I'd like to move into a 5" all-day, all mountain trailbike. For me, riding the asr5 against multilink bikes like the turner 5 spot, banshee spitfire provided a fun comparison. These is truth in the engineering, and "anti-squat" is a noticeable wheelpath characteristic when on the trail. I like the balance, handling and nimbleness of the asr5, however, the shock required precise setup to pedal properly while still being compliant and supple. Even still, i was changing propedal settings often one the short ride.

The dw and vf4p bikes don't rely on shock valving as much (at all, really) and provided a pretty different riding experience. These bike seemed to take square-edged hits a bit better, and the rear end didn't seem to drag on rocks the way a single pivot bike did. This may be placebo effect, but I believe the more vertical axle path allowed by the dw/vf4p bikes helped maintain momentum over obstacles a bit better.

Most noticeable was the response under chain tension. The turner and banshee trailbikes loved to accelerate on the climbs... it was a good feeling, coming from a single-pivot TNT turner xc bike, which I still consider a good bike. When putting power into the pedals out of a corner or up a hill, the traction and response was very significant... these bikes seemed to drive the rear wheel into the ground, rather than allowing it to creep into it's travel like many singlel-pivots. At the end of the day, I agreed that there is something to be said for wheelpath and multi-link suspension, and I like my old-school turner a bit less upon returning home.

I'd take a good look at the turner flux, 5spot, Ibis Mojo and the banshee spitfire. Coming away from the outdoor demo, I found myself split between the DW 5 spot and flux... and totally sold on the banshee spitfire. I like a trailbike that handles more low and slack, and this bike descended with amazing composure for a 120mm trailbike, while still climbing and pedaling incredibly. It's not a us-made turner... but at $1500 and adjustable geo & bb height, it's a very very good and versatile alternative.

 

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If you want a light weight frame the Pivot and
Turner frames are heavy. I myself find that if I
run the suspension on my Yeti 575 with a little
more air that pedal bob is not an issue. With
my ASR-C I don't notice any pedal bob.

Best, John
 

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Each person has a different idea on how suspension should work. I've had a couple of 4-bar types, but like the Yeti design a bit more. I set up the pressure in the shock and the pro-pedal so that bob from my slightly poor technique is removed, but the bumps from the trail are absorbed. I've had numerous mates on rides say that there is no bob whatsoever under power, but having ridden a comparison with hardtails - I know there is a lot of suspension action happening.
 

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575 v 5 spot

I am in the unique position to offer my 2Cents as I own a DW Spot and a New 575.
I made the Turner more lighter weight and light duty with smaller tires and 32mm fork as the bike is my main bike. I like the fact that you dont touch anything on the bike, just ride it and it climbs and descends well. I am however going to upgrade the shock du bushings to bearings. It seems to help as stated on the turner forum so I will let you know.

The 575 seems more all mountain capable to me. I have a 36 fork and run have found that the Marzocchi Roco tst (the one with piggyback) works the best for the bike. Like stated above I run the shock with a little less sag than the Turner and dont touch the TST knob. The 575 suspension feels like a motorcycle in the rear compared to the Turner. It can soak anything up and the Roco shock can control the bottom out with more air in the reservoir if needed. Also running same tire combo on this bike but in 2.3 size front and rear.
I have to say that I usually ride the Turner and every once in a while I will take the Yeti out thinking I should sell it as I dont ride it near enough...but after I ride it- I just fall in love all over again...there is something about it I cant explain. It has survived three main bike changes and I still have it...
 

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rgeniec said:
I am in the unique position to offer my 2Cents as I own a DW Spot and a New 575.
I made the Turner more lighter weight and light duty with smaller tires and 32mm fork as the bike is my main bike. I like the fact that you dont touch anything on the bike, just ride it and it climbs and descends well. I am however going to upgrade the shock du bushings to bearings. It seems to help as stated on the turner forum so I will let you know.

The 575 seems more all mountain capable to me. I have a 36 fork and run have found that the Marzocchi Roco tst (the one with piggyback) works the best for the bike. Like stated above I run the shock with a little less sag than the Turner and dont touch the TST knob. The 575 suspension feels like a motorcycle in the rear compared to the Turner. It can soak anything up and the Roco shock can control the bottom out with more air in the reservoir if needed. Also running same tire combo on this bike but in 2.3 size front and rear.
I have to say that I usually ride the Turner and every once in a while I will take the Yeti out thinking I should sell it as I dont ride it near enough...but after I ride it- I just fall in love all over again...there is something about it I cant explain. It has survived three main bike changes and I still have it...
Good input
I've assumed the DW spot to be my next bike. Anyways, I won't get it before I demo.
It's realy tough to beat the 575:thumbsup:
Funny you've built the lighter bike as your heavier duty AM:D .
 
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