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Back of the pack fat guy
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Thanks for posting, Mitch. Not an article - it's testimony before the Senate Subcommittee on Public Lands on S 3294, aka CIEDRA - but it does at least get across the sentiments of some of the mountain bikers in Idaho.

Per this map: http://crapo.senate.gov/issues/documents/White_Clouds_Additions_and_closed_trails_051910.pdf, here's what's lost to mountain biking if CIEDRA passes:

The Bowery Loop.
4th of July to Ant's Basin, down Warm Springs to the Williams Creek Meadows.
Fisher Creek to Robinson Bar.

Three really epic rides in the White Clouds.

Gone.

Here's some up close and personal shots you'll never get to see again (on two wheels) if CIEDRA passes.
 

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Back of the pack fat guy
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Here's my email to Sens Crapo and Risch, as well as Simpson. Probably just pissing in the wind, but what the hell.

I'm writing to express my concerns with the CIEDRA bill pending in the Senate (S 3294) as currently drafted due to its negative effects on mountain biking opportunities in Central Idaho. The prohibition of mountain biking (non-motorized) in the proposed wilderness will have a negative effect on central Idaho's tourism economy, as well as Idaho's reputation as a destination mountain biking state. I'm asking that you take the initiative to amend CIEDRA to include a provision that non-motorized mountain biking access be preserved in the proposed wilderness areas.

Mountain biking is proven to have low or no environmental impact. In fact, the use of horses and other pack animals on trails - which is allowed in wilderness areas - is proven to contribute significantly more to environmental degradation than mountain biking. Mountain biking is comparable with uses such as hiking and backpacking, causing no more harm (and often less.) Unfortunately, it is unfairly prohibited in wilderness areas. However, it clearly is a compatible with wilderness use, and therefore should be permitted in the wilderness proposed in CIEDRA.

I do not take this issue lightly and have been actively working to preserve and promote mountain biking in Idaho for years. In fact, I was personally the leader of a successful effort this year before the Idaho legislature to allow for the creation of the nation's first specialty vehicle license plate dedicated to mountain biking. (See H 486 from the 2010 session.) This bill had bipartisan sponsorship - it was sponsored by Sen. Chuck Winder in the Senate and Rep. Rich Jarvis in the House -and support in the House and Senate. It passed both by a wide margin, even now when such plates are routinely voted against.

The proceeds from the sale of this vehicle license plate will be allocated to a special fund within the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation. This fund, by the language of H 486, is to be used for the creation, preservation and maintenance of recreational trails statewide - but ONLY those trails that are open to mountain biking. The clear intent, which I expressed to the legislative committees during my testimony, is to create, preserve and maintain mountain biking opportunities in Idaho for the overall economic benefit of our citizens, by both putting money directly back into our trails, but also by implicitly advertising Idaho as a premiere mountain biking destination. Again, it will be the first of its kind in the country and serve as a positive national statement of Idaho's current reputation as one of the best places to ride.

In the work to have this legislation passed and signed by Governor Otter, which it was in March, I was able to work directly with mountain bikers and mountain bike clubs throughout Idaho. Our collective primary concern and reason for working so hard to see H 486 pass is to preserve current and historical mountain biking trails, especially those in more rural regions like Stanley. I did a significant amount of research into the positive economic benefits of mountain bike trails and tourism. Study after study from across the United States as well as Canada shows clearly that the existence of mountain bike trails and mountain biking opportunities in rural areas such as Stanley create positive and definable economic benefits.

Mountain biking and mountain bike tourism is a $6.7 billion industry in the rocky mountain states, employing over 60,000 people. In Fruita, Colorado, a town not much larger than Stanley, mountain biking alone pumps $1.5 million each year into the local economy. As a direct result of mountain bike tourism, sales tax revenues in Fruita went up 51% from ’01 to ’06, including 80% increase in restaurant sales tax revenues.

A survey of mountain bikers' travel patterns done in 2003 showed clearly that the number one factor in choosing a destination for a mountain biking vacation is the reputation of the trails at the destination. For many years now, Stanley has been gaining that sort of cherished and envied reputation as a mountain bike vacation destination. The trails currently open to mountain biking in and around Stanley - including those in the White Clouds that would be completely closed to mountain biking as a result of the passage of CIEDRA - feature exactly those sorts of "epic" riding opportunities that draw mountain bikers from across the western US to Idaho in the summer. The International Mountain Bicycling Association has consistently given Idaho the highest grade in the country - A - for the mountain biking opportunities Idaho offers.

However, CIEDRA completely eliminates three of the top mountain bike trails/rides in the Stanley area - the Bowery Loop, the ride from 4th of July Lake through Ants Basin and Warm Springs Creek to the Williams Creek Meadow, and the trail from the same meadow to Robinson Bar. Mountain bikers throughout Idaho and other parts of the country have been riding and enjoying these trails for years. These are truly the gems of mountain biking in the Gem State!

I would hope that there would be some effort to amend S 3294 to grandfather mountain biking on these trails. In so doing, Idaho would preserve its reputation as a mountain biking destination state, if not drastically improve it. If our rural-dominated state legislators can see the logic of approving a vehicle license plate dedicated to mountain biking and mountain biking trails - a very progressive attitude in my opinion - clearly you can see the obvious logic in protecting mountain biking access in Idaho.

Therefore, I urge you to do what you can to preserve mountain biking opportunities in the White Clouds.
 

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mtbr member
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hello choir, i'm going to preach to you.

i grew up in this area and have been on most of these trails. reflecting back and looking at old kodak pictures, i realize it is the access to these areas and the awe inspiring beauty provided by that access, that formed my respect for nature. many times my friends and i would drive out a logging trail, park when it became unsuitable for the car, bicycle a few more miles, and finally hike up a trail to a summit view.

the experience is awesome and we all know that...it is why we live in idaho. but take away the access provided by a bicycle and eventually individual's respect for nature dwindles. sure, for the lucky few who have time and money, a weeklong excursion into the backcountry provides the same result. but realistically, very few teenagers can do this. in fact, many adults can not do this. very slowly, people lose the connection to nature, even though the intent is "to preserve it for future generations." my kids will never get to experience the way i felt when i first saw the expanse and whiteness of the whiteclouds. they will never have memories and pictures with their best friends from high school.

to me, all trail users are valid. seriously. and sometimes (in our case) a bicycle is the best way for some individuals to stay connected to nature and the beauty of idaho. i understood this as a teenager and i understand it as an adult.

"you still have access to 55 (or whatever the distance) miles of trail." thank you for 'giving' me that. i still have access to the bus even though i have to sit in the back, right?
 

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TRAIL KUBUKI CORNDOGGER
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+1 to restore mountain biking to the minimum impact what's peaceful and beautiful about the backcountry cachet where it belongs

-1 for the having BRC involved because they're a bunch of overweight inbred pillow-biting rim-licking hopscotch-humping throttle-twisting fume-sucking dingle-nibbling snatchgravel stinkypinky enema-sucking bubble-head ponyboys with a really poor sense of Internet application usability and it's really embarrasing being lumped with a bunch of cooter-baits that don't know the difference between free press and spew. I can see Daniel-Day Lewis playing their president in an overwrought mellowdrama showing soon at your local cineplex.

 

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Back of the pack fat guy
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I just find it ridiculously ironic that this thing is entitled the "Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act." Not only are they cutting out recreational activities but, in so doing, also potentially harming the economic tourism base.

Your gubmint in action, folks. As well as ICL. Once again, ICL is harming the interests of mountain bikers.

Anybody know Minnick's take on this?
 

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mtbr member
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Earthpig said:
I just find it ridiculously ironic that this thing is entitled the "Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act."
it is absolutely true. economic development and recreation WILL happen, just not in idaho. but that is exactly the conservation league's goal.
 

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Banned
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the anti access groups are going to shut us down. Idaho has more than enough wilderness we do not need any more.

twisted crank you are so wrong it is not even funny. I am not a member of the brc but there is alot of people on that side fighting this. Just becasue some one does not recreate exactly like you doesn't make them bad people. IT makes them people that use the land you use.




on another note i am going to be down that area in mid july. Where is the fisher creek loop at or where is the trail head and what maps do you need?

thanks
tim
 

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TRAIL KUBUKI CORNDOGGER
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I'm not excluding the BRC. They're fat, stupid, lazy and lack integrity is all. I don't like fat, stupid, and lazy.. They should keep all the trails they already have. And keep their inbreeding to themselves. It's a win-win.

The only thing I hate worse than a throttle wanker is a tree-hugging, patchuli-stinking, non-hygenetic, freak-of-nature, Birkenstock-wearing, Mother Jones-loving, recycling, composting, fruit rollup-licking, organic farming, wind electric-using, Prius-driving, pansy-smelling, backpacker. It's a call for forced-sterilization. They can keep their trails too. That's another win-win.
 

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Wandervans
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There is another cool loop of less stature than the three mention. This is the germania, chamberlin lake, chamberlin creek, germania loop. It is only about a 4 1/2 hour ride and requires a little route finding on chamberlin creek because the trail is used so little. Killer downhill with a sweet waterfall. The pics are from that loop except for the last one.

Having ridden in the whiteclouds for years I have not experianced any conflict with another user, let alone seen many other users.
 

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tim208 said:
on another note i am going to be down that area in mid july. Where is the fisher creek loop at or where is the trail head and what maps do you need?
Tim, maps are available at the Stanley Ranger Station, which is located a few miles south of Stanley on ID-75 near Red Fish Lake. Continuing south the trail heads (where many of the pics are taken) are on the east side of the road.
 

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TRAIL KUBUKI CORNDOGGER
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tim208 said:
laffeaux

thank you for the info. i do appreciate it.

twisted
tell us how you really feal. :D

It is funny that I learned about ciedra from some motorheads.

tim
How do I really, um, feal? I feal that CIEDRA is a really dumb idea. I also feal that there are two even dumber ideas: the BWC and the ICL.They are made for each other though and can easily be marginalized into the same wanker bin.
 

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Otter is opposed

on another note i am going to be down that area in mid july. Where is the fisher creek loop at or where is the trail head and what maps do you need?

thanks
The BIG ride is here: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=540685

Fisher Creek Loop is just outside the proposed Wilderness but Pig Tail to Warm Springs Meadow would be closed.

More at: www.gsmba.org

Our Gov. is opposed. :D
 
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