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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All the pix of the bikes in this thread appear new and/or unpleasurable to ride.

Does anyone actually race/ride their bikes? $3000+ thrown into a package that can be snapped in half while riding around the block makes little sense to me.

Carbon fiber saddle with no padding? I am partial to Flite saddles, but come on? Really?!!!

A 20 pound snap-0-matic is more desirable than a 23 pound bike that will last multiple seasons (aside from new chain and cables)?

Am I missing something?
 

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I regularly ride my weight weenie bike on trails that are somewhat technical with lots of drops, log crossings and short downhills. I also get through the odd rock garden. I know there's much more technical trails out there, and I've ridden some in the past, but I have no problems with my builds.

I had my new Yeti out for the 1st time on Tuesday night, and did a new drop that I've never attempted before, because I always feared landing too nose heavy. It was no problem. I have broken a few parts in the past, that's for sure, and now I've learned what my limits are for parts and my riding style/abilities.

I will often put a 1 1/2 to 2 hour ride in on that CF saddle, but since it's MTB riding, and I'm often out of the saddle for climbs or dowhill runs, the hard saddle doesn't have the chance to cause discomfort.

I also have a 14lb (used ot be 13 1/4) commuter bike based on one of the Pedal Force MT carbon fiber frames, and it has the same saddle on it. My commute is only about 30-35 minutes with some good hills to climb. Sometimes I ride sitting down. Other times, I ride standing up for stretches. The key for me is having the right shorts on. I always ensure that they have a good shamy, and when the shamy starts to get worn out, I toss the shorts aside for a new pair. I also recognise when my butt or cojones are starting to get sore/numb, and stand up for a while to get the blood flowing again. YMMV!
 

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Banned
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good summary...

BlownCivic said:
I regularly ride my weight weenie bike on trails that are somewhat technical with lots of drops, log crossings and short downhills. I also get through the odd rock garden. I know there's much more technical trails out there, and I've ridden some in the past, but I have no problems with my builds.

I had my new Yeti out for the 1st time on Tuesday night, and did a new drop that I've never attempted before, because I always feared landing too nose heavy. It was no problem. I have broken a few parts in the past, that's for sure, and now I've learned what my limits are for parts and my riding style/abilities.

I will often put a 1 1/2 to 2 hour ride in on that CF saddle, but since it's MTB riding, and I'm often out of the saddle for climbs or dowhill runs, the hard saddle doesn't have the chance to cause discomfort.

I also have a 14lb (used ot be 13 1/4) commuter bike based on one of the Pedal Force MT carbon fiber frames, and it has the same saddle on it. My commute is only about 30-35 minutes with some good hills to climb. Sometimes I ride sitting down. Other times, I ride standing up for stretches. The key for me is having the right shorts on. I always ensure that they have a good shamy, and when the shamy starts to get worn out, I toss the shorts aside for a new pair. I also recognise when my butt or cojones are starting to get sore/numb, and stand up for a while to get the blood flowing again. YMMV!
pretty much the same here: i use my 15-15.5 lbs HT without any issues. you have to learn where the limit is for your needs. no ultralight wheels and semislicks for me but all the rest has hold up pretty well for me. it sure helps if you have good connections and get lower prices on some of the rather insanely priced items;)

i find full-carbon saddles are the most comfortable. we had this debate on-and-on and until you actually tried on out on your own you won't believe how much flex those ultralight saddleshells have. i have no problem with multi-hour rides on my roadbike as well where your position isn't changing as much as it does on the trails with the MTB. on the MTB definitely no problem.

the only problem i see with such builds is that once the muddy winterseason starts it might be helpful to have another bike. i really don't look for deep mudholes when riding my Scale or hour long waterrides on my 11 lbs Addict roadbike...but the Winterbike is not that much heavier and gets thrown at all that there is from deep snow, salted roads, deep mud ,water crossings etcetc...
 

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GTaholic
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That´s problem with WW bikes, they are sunny weather bikes and see very few miles per year but the pleasure to have a light bike is bigger than the drawbacks.

The evolution goes forward, the WW today is the normal riding gear tomorrow.

Even seen the bikes 10 years ago?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mattias_Hellöre said:
That´s problem with WW bikes, they are sunny weather bikes and see very few miles per year but the pleasure to have a light bike is bigger than the drawbacks.

The evolution goes forward, the WW today is the normal riding gear tomorrow.

Even seen the bikes 10 years ago?
I'm a bigger guy at 6'3" and weight 210. My current "go to" rig is a 10 year old Independent Fabrications Deluxe HT a bunch of parts that date back to mid 1990s, and a 2001 X-Fly fork. 2X8 gearing. It is very light (IMHO) at under 21 lbs for a 21" frame. It is fast, comfortable, and I can really hammer on it. Sub 21 lbs FS sounds cool, but I would be too afraid to break it.... cost to replace parts multiplies exponentially as the weight drops. I could likely drop a little weight, but I more content with the stainless steal spindle White Industries spindle rather than titanium. The weight is offset by the Middleburn crankset (old school RS-3... partial to square spindles).

I appreciate lost weight, but there is a point where common sense is lost and natural selection takes over?

I hate walking 5-10 miles carrying a broken bike. I hate broken collar bones ever more.

I have tried carbon saddles as well (tried one on my road bike)... I REALLY tried. There was no way that I could adjust to counter sore spots on boney areas (I like to spin while in the saddle). Might have something to do with my size and weight. Not fun.
 

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The MTB Lab
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2,556 Posts
I ride my 23 lb 5.5inch suspension bike everywhere, mostly I live in rock gardens so I abuse it hard, winter, summer, spring and fall. I skip light wimpy (and skinny) tires cause they get destroyed where I ride otherwise I have lots of weight weenie stuff.
 

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Hack Racer
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2,559 Posts
I ride my 19.6 lbs full suspension kona hei hei supreme any where and any time. I just finished a 24 hour relay race where I did 3 night laps in the rain. Slick clay. Deep Mud. Stupid me didn't realize the course was that slick and ran it with racing ralphs 2.1s. This was the maiden voyage for my $4000 brand new FS bike that took me 6 months to peice together (due to various back ordering of parts).

I do wash and clean my bike after each use. That is why it always looks new. I also know how to pick a line and not just barrel through anything and everything. It helps increase the life of light weight parts.
 

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pedal pusher
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I've ridden my $3,500 20lb Snap-O-Matic® for 8 years (some parts for 9 years) and I've never held back, except in the places where I thought *I* might snap in half.

Issues so far:

- Carbon post that probably had an issue after 7.5 years of being clamped too tight
- Sram 9.0SL rear derailler that had a worn down pulley I couldn't find a replacement for (7 years of use)
- Aluminum chainrings (usually last me 3-4 years each)
- '99 SID SL seized up after 7 years

That's it. If you build it right and don't ride like an idiot, your bike will last.
 

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Jam Econo
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4,213 Posts
f3rg said:
I've ridden my $3,500 20lb Snap-O-Matic® for 8 years (some parts for 9 years) and I've never held back, except in the places where I thought *I* might snap in half.

Issues so far:

- Carbon post that probably had an issue after 7.5 years of being clamped too tight
- Sram 9.0SL rear derailler that had a worn down pulley I couldn't find a replacement for (7 years of use)
- Aluminum chainrings (usually last me 3-4 years each)
- '99 SID SL seized up after 7 years

That's it. If you build it right and don't ride like an idiot, your bike will last.
You get 3-4 years out of chainrings? That's impressive.
 
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