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Team Cspine
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Couldn't hurt

Dirtboyracer said:
Is it really neccasary to buy a torque wrench for installation of non-carbon parts on a bike such as disc rotors or BB's?
$59 for a good Craftsman torque wrench at Sears. Most of the parts on a bike require a pretty small amount of torque and it's easy to overtorque those hex head bolts. Probably not a big deal if you're just a recreational rider, I've never bothered to use one myself but I know racers who do.

Just my $.02/100.

Dammit now I'll have to go buy one just to say I have one...
 

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Dirtboyracer said:
Is it really neccasary to buy a torque wrench for installation of non-carbon parts on a bike such as disc rotors or BB's?
No it's neccessary to buy one, you could steal it instead. A beam type is all you need for bike work, $29 will get you one just make sure I has a low range in/pound scale.. It would be more accurate then a cheap click type. While it's not 100% neccessary, using one for a while will give you a better idea of what the different inch/pound torques really feel like. Most people really don't have a clue and many bolts get way overtightened. If you use a torque wrench and anti-sieze coumpound on threads you should never have to post on this forum "how do I remove my stuck whatever" that you see so often here.
 

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Mr_Whiskerz said:
I could see where they would be helpful on disc rotors, so you don't overtighten one or two bolts, and have a slightly warped rotor from the get-go.
Disc rotors are indeed a good example.

If you overtorque the rotor bolts, you risk damaging the hub to which the rotor is attached, On the other hand, if you do not tighten them enough, you risk the bolt loosening and perhaps coming free. (Fortunately, there's enough redundancy that the loss of one bolt would probably not be catastrophic.)

Stem bolts are another good example, and are easily overtorqued. Too tight and you risk weakening the stem. Too loose and you risk the stem rotating on the steer tube. (Or the handlebar rotating.) I know that unless I use a torque wrench my tendency is to overtighten stem bolts.
 

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bulletbob said:
$59 for a good Craftsman torque wrench at Sears. Most of the parts on a bike require a pretty small amount of torque and it's easy to overtorque those hex head bolts. Probably not a big deal if you're just a recreational rider, I've never bothered to use one myself but I know racers who do.

Just my $.02/100.

Dammit now I'll have to go buy one just to say I have one...
About 99% of my tools are Craftsman but when it comes to torque wrenches, go to Home Depot and get a Husky, they have a lifetime guarantee. Craftsman torque wrenches only carry a 1 year.
 
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