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Just wondering if height and especially weight has any bearing on the wear and tear of bike components? For instance, I ride about 3x as much as my husband and my KMC chain lasted for many more miles than the same chain on his bike. He’s 6’7” and 225 lbs, I’m 5’4” and 130 lbs.
 

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Yes, a heavier rider has to produce more power than a lighter rider to go the same speed, especially when climbing hills. More power to the pedals equals faster drivetrain wear.

Other components are stressed more as well by heavier/more powerful riders but mostly drivetrain components ime.
 

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I'd say weight is more of an issue than height, but a rider's power output, gear ratio choice, and rider terrain preference may also contribute. At 5'10" and 165lbs, I go through chains and cassettes somewhat faster than a friend who is 5'6" and 225lbs because I climb more elevation than he does and I stand and grind in high gears while he sits and spins in lower gears.

In addition to the drivetrain wear mentioned above, heavier riders will also wear brake pads faster.
 

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Do fat people break stuff? Yes.

Close thread.


So do skinny people. Weight can be a factor for sure but for some things it's mostly about power. A skinny xc guy putting out 300 watts will probably wear out their drivetrain just as fast as a big person producing the same power. Generally though big people produce more power than smaller ones.
 

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Other issues like cross-chain angle and the size of the rings (and the years you use) play a big role.
 

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Thinking about riding.
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Does that make sense on your planet? :0.
For drivetrain yes. For suspension no. Drivetrains care about the power they see, why would weight matter aside from that?

Other issues like cross-chain angle and the size of the rings (and the years you use) play a big role.
Yup, and how much grit you allow to accumulate before washing... Lots of variables.
 

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Simple answer, yes.
F=MA. Force = mass x acceleration, its a law of physics. Just sitting on bike husband is causing more force on it.
More force, more wear. Given same surfaces, more weight, more friction.
Of course maintenance, conditions, and riding style make a diff too, but fact if the matter is that heavier riders wear out and/or break stuff faster, go over and ask in the clyde forum.
Oh, and same powr output debate is leaving out some other factors. A light rider with same power output as heavier rider, to cover same distance the heavier rider would have to ride longer time, more wear.
 

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Simple answer, yes.
F=MA. Force = mass x acceleration, its a law of physics. Just sitting on bike husband is causing more force on it.
More force, more wear. Given same surfaces, more weight, more friction.
Of course maintenance, conditions, and riding style make a diff too, but fact if the matter is that heavier riders wear out and/or break stuff faster, go over and ask in the clyde forum.
Yes, but that is only dealing with the parts where weight is an issue. The frame and fork, maybe the wheels.

As others have alluded, a 150lb dude throwing 400w into the drivetrain is putting far more stress onto drive train wear items than a 250lb guy pedaling at 220w.
 

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Yes, but that is only dealing with the parts where weight is an issue. The frame and fork, maybe the wheels.

As others have alluded, a 150lb dude throwing 400w into the drivetrain is putting far more stress onto drive train wear items than a 250lb guy pedaling at 220w.
Wait, now your confusing things by changing the power! Of course what you stated would be true! A 150lb dude throwing 400w into drivetrain and a 260lb guy throwing 400w into drivetrain is putting same stress into drivetrains. But to cover the same distance the clyde has to work harder (longer), just ask any clyde!
 

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A 150lb dude throwing 400w into drivetrain and a 260lb guy throwing 400w into drivetrain is putting same stress into drivetrains. But to cover the same distance the clyde has to work harder (longer), just ask any clyde!

Not if you're going downhill, or if you live on pig's planet ;)
 

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I haven’t read much of this thread so excuse me if this has been said.

There’s those that are mashers and those that are spinners when climbing. Some stand or even sit and mash the pedals in a higher gear than a spinner. A spinner is sitting and chooses a gear that propels the bike forward with more revolutions [a lower gear] but less downward force on the power stroke which is less wearing on the chain and entire drivetrain than a masher. Obviously weight has a lot to do either as far as wear on the drivetrain, especially if you are a masher.
 

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Not if you're going downhill, or if you live on pig's planet ;)
I don't understand why this is even being debated. It's not remotely complicated and the notion that the two different weight riders with the same power output will cause the same wear is one of the dumbest things I've read. I feel stupider for even arguing about it!

Take two identical cars. Fill one with bricks! Except for the bit the driver sits in, yeah I'm guessing I do have to state the bleeding obvious here. Every working part of the heavier car will wear out quicker because it is having to work harder and will have more strain on it. The transmission is under greater load, the brakes have to work harder, the whole car is going to fall to bits much quicker. If you can't understand that I can't help you.
 

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When/why did this thread turn into disrespecting an overweight person, when there wasn't even an overweight person referred to in this thread.

Why is this being debated?? -fairly obvious that OP wasn't sure why there was a wear patter, likely from inexperience.
 

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I don't understand why this is even being debated. It's not remotely complicated and the notion that the two different weight riders with the same power output will cause the same wear is one of the dumbest things I've read. I feel stupider for even arguing about it!

The op specifically asked about chain/drivetrain wear and that's what I was responding to. I acknowledged that a bigger rider has to put out more power to to go the same speed as a lighter one, therefore more wear per mile.

I added that a heavier rider doesn't necessarily wear chains faster though, and that it's really about how much power is applied to the pedals. Some light riders put down more power than heavy ones and they will wear out chains quicker. With drivetrain parts it's watts, not weight.

I didn't mean to confuse the issue, or anger you. Sorry.
 
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