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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Other than weight and price, what are the biggest difference between the two DT hubs? I have a pair of Giant CXR-1 carbon gravel wheels that have the 350 hubs. The wheels are excellent but lack the instant engagement I was hoping for. Is upgrading to the 54t star ratchet kit an option for the 350? BTW do the 240's have better bearings than the 350? Someone said the 240's use stainless steal while the 350 use chromoly.
 

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Other than weight and price, what are the biggest difference between the two DT hubs? I have a pair of Giant CXR-1 carbon gravel wheels that have the 350 hubs. The wheels are excellent but lack the instant engagement I was hoping for. Is upgrading to the 54t star ratchet kit an option for the 350? BTW do the 240's have better bearings than the 350? Someone said the 240's use stainless steal while the 350 use chromoly.
You answered your own questions
 

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So I can upgrade to the 54t ratchet kit? = YES

Also is it worth upgrading to the better SS bearings from the 240? = WHEN YOUR EXISTING ONES WEAR OUT, IF YOU LIVE RIDE IN "HARSH" CONDITIONS
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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I have both 240s and 350s. I went with the 36 star tooth ratchet upgrade with both (keeping my 18s just in case). I was told by numerous guys I trust (including a wheel manufacturer) to avoid the 54 because it’s significantly more fragile than the 36, and a LOT more fragile than the 18.

I frankly notice zero difference in engagement. Then again, I was used to the 18s and probably adapted my riding style to accommodate the low POEs.

The best thing about the 36s...the sweet zing on the trail. LOVE how they sound now.
 

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Stainless is a *worse* bearing material in terms of rolling. The only benefit of stainless is corrosion resistance if you ride in places that that matters. Otherwise, normal steel bearings can be made to tighter tolerances in hardness and durability specs that work better for a bike bearing.

Not that 240 bearings are bad, they're not. They're better than 350 bearings, but if you're replacing either, I would go for the best bearings you can find, but not in stainless.

350's are basically identical to 240's, with a little less machining and they're made in a different country. The bearings are still very good. IMO, the 350 made the 240 irrelevant. Its not worth the price increase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Great info guys. I plan on ordering the 54t ratchet upgrade for now in hopes the faster engagement becomes apparent. If not, at least the sound will be cooler.
 

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Great info guys. I plan on ordering the 54t ratchet upgrade for now in hopes the faster engagement becomes apparent. If not, at least the sound will be cooler.
Waste of money. Less durable, too. Go 36 and save some greenbacks.

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high pivot witchcraft
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Waste of money. Less durable, too. Go 36 and save some greenbacks.

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I am trying to tell him that too but...

And OP - make sure to keep the 18. Take it with you in your pack. Just in case the 36 or 54 blows up on the trail. They are easy to swap if this happens.
 

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Great info guys. I plan on ordering the 54t ratchet upgrade for now in hopes the faster engagement becomes apparent. If not, at least the sound will be cooler.
If you were after "instant" engagement you bought the wrong hub. I agree with others, go with the 36 for more durability.
 

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No Clue Crew
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I've run 54t as well on several bikes for years. That said, it's purely anecdotal. The 54t ratchet mechanism IS more fragile. Just hasn't happened to me.
 

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Stainless is a *worse* bearing material in terms of rolling. The only benefit of stainless is corrosion resistance if you ride in places that that matters....
Yeah. Very rarely is stainless steel the best material for a particular application in terms of its mechanical physical properties, but in many applications its chemical properties (corrosion resistance) are considered beneficial enough to accept the compromise in its physical properties.

Carbon steel bearings will function better and longer than stainless steel bearings as long as they're kept well lubed and the the lube isn't contaminated with water or aqueous solvents, as might happen when washing a bike.
 

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Love my DT350's for their bullet proof performance. I've used both 36 and 54 tooth drivers. I notice the upgrade from 18 to 36 or 54, but don't notice much when swapping between 36 & 54. The only reason I got the 54 is that it was priced the same as the 36. No problems with the 54 under this 225lb masher...
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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Love my DT350's for their bullet proof performance. I've used both 36 and 54 tooth drivers. I notice the upgrade from 18 to 36 or 54, but don't notice much when swapping between 36 & 54. The only reason I got the 54 is that it was priced the same as the 36. No problems with the 54 under this 225lb masher...
Really odd. I don't know why everyone else seems to notice the higher engagement moving from 18 to 36 or 54, and I do not. I ride in reasonably techy terrain. Except for any obvious hike a bike portions, I climb everything.

Like I said, I don't notice much apart from the beautiful trail music emanating from that hub.

As for earlier posts, yes, anecdotal only re progressively increased fragility moving from 18 to 36 to 54.

And no - not talking about any Chinese ****. I don't know a single person who would contaminate their bikes with knock off junk.

As for who I relied on in buying the 36 over the 54, I spoke at length with Dustin Brown, owner of We Are One. I also spoke with Jerry (aka Travis Bickle, aka Legbacon) numerous times, including in person. Up until Jerry's untimely passing on July 9, from his Strava feed, he had amassed 105 rides in 2019 and and over 2001 Kms. All that was on Cumberland dirt. He did not ride pavement. Plus he worked at Black's Cycle in Comox. Add to that 3 or 4 local shredders from my LBS (some of whom are sponsored racers on the CDN enduro circuit), all of whom said the same thing - fragility increases, maintenance increases and rolling resistance increases, all increasingly, as you move from 18 to 36 to 54. Some of these guys told me to stick with 18 because there was no noticeable improvement in engagement, and the 18 was "bulletproof". Both the senior mechanic at my LBS and Dustin suggested I carry the 18 with me on the trail, just in case.

All that said, in hindsight, I am sure the 54 would be fine for me. I ride very light on my bikes. I am going to pick up a 54 and try it. All of this has made me very curious. Plus I know that at least some of you are hard charging riders with lots of Kms, who I can trust your opinion on things. You never know on here how much actual riding some posters do, who profess to know what they are talking about.
 

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The distance between the pawls catching on the three options is 360/teeth right? So
18t=20deg
36t= 10deg
54t=6.7 deg
I can see how people may tell a difference moving from 18t to anything, but not 36 to 54. On a 175mm crank that's a pedal-path circumference of 1100mm, so the amount your foot actually moves is:
18t=20deg/360*1100= 61mm
36t= 10deg/360*1100=31mm
54t=6.7 deg/360*1100= 21mm

Again, I can see 3cm being the difference between a pedal strike and not, 1cm may be too, but a lot less so. Some people are more sensitive to this stuff though, and everyone's different. I know I would not be able to tell between 36 and 54, but that's just me!

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high pivot witchcraft
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**** guys. After thinking more about what you have said, I am going to qualify what I said above about not noticing any difference going from the 18 to 36 tooth star ratchet.

*sorry for the wishy washiness*

I used to notice the occasional audible clunk in my driveline on my old bike, especially when coasting on rooty flats. It would happen most noticeably on one stretch of one of my favorite trails that I have ridden hundreds of times. I attributed it to the insanely high anti-squat and pedal kickback my old bike had.

With the Druid's idler pulley and high single pivot design, it has much less pedal kickback. Virtually none actually, despite an extreme rearward axle path.

I no longer hear the clunk I used to hear.

I attributed that to the Druid's linkage design and high single pivot. Maybe that's wrong. Maybe it is in fact attributable, at least in part, to moving from 18 to 36 teeth, which I did when I bought my Druid frame.

Sorry for the multiple posts. I am just trying to be as accurate as I can in terms of conveying my experience.

OP - apologies for the derailment of your thread.

My advice, FWIW, is to get the 350s for sure. Whether you go with the 18, 36 or 54 tooth star ratchet is up to you. I am going to pick up the 54 ASAP and try it out, more out of curiosity than anything else (I will continue to carry the 18 with me on the trail though).

From what I have observed, most guys I trust run either the stock 18 or the "upgraded" 36 and are happy with it. Based on the comments above, I suspect you would be happy with any of the star ratchets and the 350s.

It may come down to noise level. The 54 will be even louder than the 36, which you (and I) may like.

In any event, sorry to have dragged you into my madness. Good luck and please keep us posted.
 
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