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The insert is a massive change to the structure of the tire. The tire also has less room for deflection to absorb any rocks or roots which may cause losses of energy pushing you upward rather than forming better with the terrain and keeping you rolling forward. You're assuming the weight is the sole reason it might be draining your energy without taking into account the other variables.
Tire inserts typically increase deformation of the tire because you run less pressure (*typically*). According to Cushcore they improve rolling resistance (I'm skeptical as to how broadly that applies). They also have more damping than air so I could see that hurting rolling resistance in some cases. What I feel is the weight while accelerating though. When I say playing around in the driveway it's not that noticeable I really mean it's not that bad. I can feel the difference in weight in the driveway. You can actually feel it just spinning the wheel by turning the cranks by hand.
 

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I'm not putting a $500 power meter on my Enduro bike so the only consumer grade measurement tool would be a heart rate monitor and a stop watch. I still challenge anyone to the above and add some stick on weights to their wheels to test it themselves. It will only cost a few dollars and everyone knows about how quick they should be on a section of trail they know well. None of you are going to believe me if I post my results anyway.


I don't know if you mentioned it earlier but you'd need to stick the weights on the frame for the other runs for accuracy. Also you'd have to do a lot of runs, and use a power meter for best results.

I guess a lot would depend on the course too. Weight definitely matters but the latest science (that I've heard) seems to conclude that rotating weight doesn't matter any more than stagnant weight.
 

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I don't know if you mentioned it earlier but you'd need to stick the weights on the frame for the other runs for accuracy. Also you'd have to do a lot of runs, and use a power meter for best results.

I guess a lot would depend on the course too. Weight definitely matters but the latest science (that I've heard) seems to conclude that rotating weight doesn't matter any more than stagnant weight.
I did not add weight to the frame since I was just checking the effect for new tires. Since the weight had no noticable effect on the tires vs no added weight what so ever I doubt there would be a measurable difference. The loop also had short rolling hills so no sustained climbs more than a few mins. Also very little braking for anything really. Since I was more inexperienced lap times could vary by up to 5mins anyway (30 to 35mins at a moderate pace). The unweighted ride vs the weighted ride were both well within my usual 5mins variance and I took the same lines at the same heart rate since I did have a Polar HR watch/chest strap. I'm sure I'd be more precise now if I tried again.
 

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I didnt start mtb that long ago (2012 timeframe). Back then 2.3 tires were big and even regular riders tried to go with lightweight tires. For me 600-700 gram were what I rode. You could go lighter, but all the limestone in central texas slice sidewalls very easily. Ive never worn out a tire.

I ride 2.3 nobby nic/2.3 ikon. We dont have massive downhills, so you dont pick up that much speed. There arent a lot of high speed carving turns. Trails are more technical than fast. Descents might be .5 miles, 300 feet elevation at the most. Im thinking maybe the big knob tires dont really matter for central texas? (Though I know a lot of people ride DHF/aggressor).

I put 2.3 DHF minions on my new ripmo and I couldnt stand how heavy and slow they were so I switched to forekaster/ikon and it is *much* better. I was absolutely hating the ripmo, but with the new tires I love it.

The fat tire revolution appeared and I was thinking WTF. how are people riding 1kg tires or even 1.2kg.

Do people really benefit that much from 2.5-3.0 tires? Are we crazy for wanting the lightest tires possible?
A huge amount of dross and conjecture so I thought I'd go back to your original post. So first some context, this is the Weight Weenie forum, therefore nothing heavier is ever worth the weight, lol.

Secondly, are you racing or riding for fun? If you're racing in Central Texas, no, 2.6s are not worth the weight. The only XCM or XCO course I could think of that it would be worth it for is the El Paso Puzzler in the treacherous Franklin Mountain State Park on the far Western Texas border.

If you're riding for fun, then yes the extra weight is worth it, for durability and comfort. My bike in race mode is 22 pounds and change. My Tallboy converts back into trail bike mode and is 27-28 pounds when I'm not racing. The extra weight is more durable, comfortable components.

A Nobby Nic 2.6 is a great tire for going out there to explore trails for the first time. I've pulled up in Sedona, Sante Fe, or across the state and been able to comfortably point downhill first ride everywhere. I wouldn't do that with an XC race bike.
 

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A huge amount of dross and conjecture so I thought I'd go back to your original post. So first some context, this is the Weight Weenie forum, therefore nothing heavier is ever worth the weight, lol.

Secondly, are you racing or riding for fun? If you're racing in Central Texas, no, 2.6s are not worth the weight. The only XCM or XCO course I could think of that it would be worth it for is the El Paso Puzzler in the treacherous Franklin Mountain State Park on the far Western Texas border.

If you're riding for fun, then yes the extra weight is worth it, for durability and comfort. My bike in race mode is 22 pounds and change. My Tallboy converts back into trail bike mode and is 27-28 pounds when I'm not racing. The extra weight is more durable, comfortable components.

A Nobby Nic 2.6 is a great tire for going out there to explore trails for the first time. I've pulled up in Sedona, Sante Fe, or across the state and been able to comfortably point downhill first ride everywhere. I wouldn't do that with an XC race bike.
Complains about dross and conjecture... offers more dross and conjecture.

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
 

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I live in central Texas and race XC, Enduro and sometimes other events. I have tried 2.6 on both the XC and Enduro bikes and find it unnecessary ...assuming you have a suspension fork. Even on the Enduro where weight is not as much of a concern, I find a 2.6 provides little to no advantage over a proper 2.3-2.5.

If your goal is to soften the front-end, maybe reduce tire pressure on your current tire or ease up on the LSC on your fork. If your goal is better front-end traction, look at riding position (you, stem length, bar height, etc), tire pressure, and fork setup.
 

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I live in central Texas and race XC, Enduro and sometimes other events. I have tried 2.6 on both the XC and Enduro bikes and find it unnecessary ...assuming you have a suspension fork. Even on the Enduro where weight is not as much of a concern, I find a 2.6 provides little to no advantage over a proper 2.3-2.5.

If your goal is to soften the front-end, maybe reduce tire pressure on your current tire or ease up on the LSC on your fork. If your goal is better front-end traction, look at riding position (you, stem length, bar height, etc), tire pressure, and fork setup.
Good feedback thank you, was debating between 2.4s and 2.6 tires for a hardtail.
 

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Ran across this thread looking for light wheel sets. Have a stumpy Evo that I’ve been trying to set up at a lighter weight but maintain some aggressive bent. I live it the SE so need the bike to go from flowy XC w minimal sustained downs, to super tech, sustained DH. I’ve settled on an interesting but pretty decent combo of light weight but decent traction w a 2.5 DHF max terra EXO+ (1035g) up front and a dual casing 2.35 Forkaster EXO (735g) out back. So far been really happy.
 

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I use a Nobby Nic 2.6 front and Bontrager XR3 2.4 rear, an odd coupling but works out well. I use my trail wheelset on long ride adventures for trails I may have never ridden before, and it helps to have a big front foot.
 
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