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Discussion Starter #1
I didnt start mtb that long ago (2012 timeframe). Back then 2.3 tires were big and even regular riders tried to go with lightweight tires. For me 600-700 gram were what I rode. You could go lighter, but all the limestone in central texas slice sidewalls very easily. Ive never worn out a tire.

I ride 2.3 nobby nic/2.3 ikon. We dont have massive downhills, so you dont pick up that much speed. There arent a lot of high speed carving turns. Trails are more technical than fast. Descents might be .5 miles, 300 feet elevation at the most. Im thinking maybe the big knob tires dont really matter for central texas? (Though I know a lot of people ride DHF/aggressor).

I put 2.3 DHF minions on my new ripmo and I couldnt stand how heavy and slow they were so I switched to forekaster/ikon and it is *much* better. I was absolutely hating the ripmo, but with the new tires I love it.

The fat tire revolution appeared and I was thinking WTF. how are people riding 1kg tires or even 1.2kg.

Do people really benefit that much from 2.5-3.0 tires? Are we crazy for wanting the lightest tires possible?
 

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3.0 tires are the bees knees!!

Climb up & roll down stuff that'll have you bailing or OTB'ing on narrower tires.

My 29x3.0 tires weigh 1100g approx.

My 29x2.5/2.4 tires weigh 970-930g.

My 27.5x2.5/2.4 tires weigh 920-895g.

The extra 100+ grams, enables so much confidence on technical climbs/descents.

Go down gnar that'd make Spiderman blush

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Are 2.6 and fat tires really worth the weight?


Depends on individual priorities. For me, the answer to that qurstion is yes. I’m sure others feel differently and that cool. We should each run whatever we feel suits our personal needs best.
=sParty
 

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Do people really benefit that much from 2.5-3.0 tires? Are we crazy for wanting the lightest tires possible?
I would not even consider 3.0, it was an industry driven fad that ran smack on against reality: nobody needs those monsters unless you are riding on the beach. A lot of bikes don't even fit 3.0 tires any longer (e.g. the new Mojo from Ibis).

2.6 is a matter of preference. I used to run a Nobby Nic 2.6 mostly to try to find some extra plush and control that was quite lacking. But the problem was the fork. Since I switched to a Push ACS3 I went happily back to 2.3, no need for 2.6 ... and reality is that a bigger tire is slower up the hill .... Currently on Nobby Nic 2.3/2.3 on my HD3
 

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Depends on your terrain and speeds. But also very dependent on rim width and pressure.
If you don't have wide enough rims to run low pressure you don't get the performance.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
are most people riding the types of trails where they need the performance? Our trails are absolutely brutally rocky. Climbing absolutely sucks with the giant tires, but the downhills are fine with a 2.3.

For XC type trails around the country, it seems like these tires arent really needed. what are examples of trails where these types of tires shine?
 

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I would not even consider 3.0, it was an industry driven fad that ran smack on against reality: nobody needs those monsters unless you are riding on the beach. A lot of bikes don't even fit 3.0 tires any longer (e.g. the new Mojo from Ibis).

2.6 is a matter of preference. I used to run a Nobby Nic 2.6 mostly to try to find some extra plush and control that was quite lacking. But the problem was the fork. Since I switched to a Push ACS3 I went happily back to 2.3, no need for 2.6 ... and reality is that a bigger tire is slower up the hill .... Currently on Nobby Nic 2.3/2.3 on my HD3
You're running a nobby nic on the front of an HD, so....

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In my experience, big 2.6-2.8 tires had casings that were very flimsy and bouncy. The width of the tires gave it a monster truck feel, but they would bottom out easily on hard bumps hit squarely. A curb that would normally give my front tire no problem would rim strike both front and rear, even with higher pressures that I would run in a 2.3. Trying to avoid bumps square on didn't really help their case, since they'd catch so many on the edge and deflect like a pinball, due to their wide nature. They really needed a tougher casing and perhaps slower rebound rubber, but they weighed so much already...

I can only recommend them if you are exploring trails that aren't commonly ridden. Maybe moto and 4x4 trails that don't have a single smooth line. They monster truck weeds and crusty ground that's not compacted.

Being unable to pedal even a 2.3 DHF... that's just a matter of grit and fitness. You probably haven't been desensitized to grippy tires. I guess that's why you posted here in the WW forum...


On the bike I ride, I have long CS (444mm) and a relatively tucked in front wheel (1195mm WB), which nets me plenty of traction up front, so I actually reversed my tire situation. I run a grippy reinforced 2.5 tire in back, and 2.3 snakeskin tire up front. Seems to work pretty well for the low traction climbs, and I'm not too afraid of letting off the brakes on descents. I guess I trust the precision of a 2.3 more than the false confidence of the 2.6, which pinballs me around in the rough. People claim to not feel the drag of a front tire, but I certainly do. I don't find drag in the rear to be felt that much. Probably just due to how my bike's weight distro is.

Yea, I think wanting light tires is crazy. I'm determined to wear out some tires. I've had Maxxis MaxTerra tires with 2.5k miles, but haven't yet really worn any bald. I've made Kenda and Vee tires bald, but those only took like 500 miles. Hopefully, by choosing durable tires...
 

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Do you typically ram your front tire squarely into curbs?

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Discussion Starter #10
Do you typically ram your front tire squarely into curbs?

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[HR][/HR]

we will have 3-4 square edge ledges in a row. eventually you are going to mistime and hit one.

This video is someone going down, but you can see the ledges all in a row.

[video]https://youtu.be/chT1YYMMUKk?t=55[/video]
 

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Trail Ninja
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Do you typically ram your front tire squarely into curbs?

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Yea, it's become an expected level of capability from my bike. I use it as a reference, since I presume there's some standard curb geometry that could be found across the world. I've been ramming curbs ever since I got my first real mtb fork.

I commute to the trails on bike, so crossing 4 lane roads with islands between the right-turn traffic and normal traffic might be something I get up on at low speed to hit the crossing button. I also hit curbs if I'm carrying cargo too, like groceries, and want to get off the road, such as crossing a narrow bridge/overpass without a shoulder. Commuting by mtb is the only way I could do so and retain my sanity, for the past 20+ years.

The gist is that the 2.6-2.8 tires rimstrike too easily, and adding pressure doesn't seem to help. Based on experience, I think plus just lacks the ability to be ridden aggressively on hard and rocky terrain. Expensive lesson learned through expensive busted rims (Stan's Bravo) and expensive tubeless tires that pinched. I run CushCore full time too, though not with my current DH rear tire (since it was a ***** to install).
 

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I would not even consider 3.0, it was an industry driven fad that ran smack on against reality: nobody needs those monsters unless you are riding on the beach.

You may not need them for your trails. Totally fine.

But you don't live everywhere. Lots of people have conditions that not only warrant 3" or bigger tires, they demand it: Any smaller and you're walking.
 

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Yea, it's become an expected level of capability from my bike. I use it as a reference, since I presume there's some standard curb geometry that could be found across the world. I've been ramming curbs ever since I got my first real mtb fork.

I commute to the trails on bike, so crossing 4 lane roads with islands between the right-turn traffic and normal traffic might be something I get up on at low speed to hit the crossing button. I also hit curbs if I'm carrying cargo too, like groceries, and want to get off the road, such as crossing a narrow bridge/overpass without a shoulder. Commuting by mtb is the only way I could do so and retain my sanity, for the past 20+ years.

The gist is that the 2.6-2.8 tires rimstrike too easily, and adding pressure doesn't seem to help. Based on experience, I think plus just lacks the ability to be ridden aggressively on hard and rocky terrain. Expensive lesson learned through expensive busted rims (Stan's Bravo) and expensive tubeless tires that pinched. I run CushCore full time too, though not with my current DH rear tire (since it was a ***** to install).
You ever consider bunny-hopping these square-edged curbs instead of casing straight into them and then blaming the tires for your complete lack of finesse or skills?

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You're running a nobby nic on the front of an HD, so....

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So ... what? you might need a 2.5-2.6 tire in some conditions, but believe me a lot of the reasons to do so are just slightly less imaginary than the reasons the industry was putting forward to use 3.0 tires. Remember? Some industry megaphones, e.g. pinkbike, were going as far as seeing the "3.0 standard" as the gate to the return of the hard tail :madman:

Fast forward 5 years and many makers do not even provide the option for a 3.0 back tire. Check it out: the whole Ibis full suspension line up tops out at 2.6. And 2.3-2.4-2.5 work great as long as you have a good suspension. The reason is that what provides traction, control and shock absorption is indeed your suspension, not plus or minus millimeters of tire diameter put there as a band-aid ...
 

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So ... what? you might need a 2.5-2.6 tire in some conditions, but believe me a lot of the reasons to do so are just slightly less imaginary than the reasons the industry was putting forward to use 3.0 tires. Remember? Some industry megaphones, e.g. pinkbike, were going as far as seeing the "3.0 standard" as the gate to the return of the hard tail :madman:

Fast forward 5 years and many makers do not even provide the option for a 3.0 back tire. And the reason is that what provides traction, control and shock absorption is your suspension, not plus or minus millimeters of tire diameter ...
You don't have to convince me, I'm mostly riding 2.3-2.5, but 2.6-3 has it's place too. But if you're using a nobby nic on the front of an HD you're either under-tired or overbiked, and everyone should take your tire recommendations with a couple pinches of salt.

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You don't have to convince me, I'm mostly riding 2.3-2.5, but 2.6-3 has it's place too. But if you're using a nobby nic on the front of an HD you're either under-tired or overbiked, and everyone should take your tire recommendations with a couple pinches of salt.

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and .. exactly ... why? Don't be silly, I ride a NN 2.3 because it works better, with my revamped suspension, than a NN 2.6, and pretty much the same of a MM 2.35.
 

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and .. exactly ... why? Don't be silly, I ride a NN 2.3 because it works better, with my revamped suspension, than a NN 2.6, and pretty much the same of a MM 2.35.
Nobody's talking about a 2.6NN, I'm talking about the tread. The NN is a fine tire for what it is, but if you think it performs pretty much the same as a Magic Mary then I don't even know what to say to that. Thanks for confirming that you're overbiked and that your opinions on tires should be completely disregarded.
 

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I am finding the best benefit of 2.6 tires to be the height. I get a noticeable height increase in BB. I went from a 2.6 tire to a 2.4 rekon and the drop was noticeable and also experienced the first pedal strike explosion crash. Going back to 2.6.
 

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You ever consider bunny-hopping these square-edged curbs instead of casing straight into them and then blaming the tires for your complete lack of finesse or skills?

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Curbs are rather blunt and small. The bike should handle a lot more. I cross over ruts that are worse hits than a curb. If you bunny hop one curb sized obstacle, what about the other ones on the other side?

If you're going slower because you know the tires can't cope with the hits, it seems odd for you to adapt to it, when you can choose to pick something that better adapts to the terrain and you. Swapping back to narrower tires offered confidence to just straight line through all sorts of chunk. Slowing down, being picky about lines, snaking around obstacles... if this sounds like your style, I guess you don't know what you're giving up.
 
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