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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently ride a GX Ripmo and love it. I would even call it my dream bike in many ways. That said, I am thinking of trading it in for a Ripley V4.
I have been a full face, hard-charging enduro-style rider, but several recent injuries have me ready to calm down a bit, and no longer look for the biggest jumps/drops, gnarliest rocks, etc.
I love big days with long miles and tons of climbing and descending.
All of that said, I think that switching to the Ripley might fit perfectly with the calmer approach to riding that I am trying to take, as it will be perfect for really long days, and in theory, it should be more poppy and playful on roots and small features that I love boosting off of.
My main two concerns are 1. Will the Ripley be enough on the descents, I'm thinking descents like what you get a lot of in southern California, Raccoon Mountain in Chattanooga, and Coldwater, AL for reference.
And 2. at around 180lb kitted out, I am a fairly powerful rider, and I worry that I will feel significantly more flex than I do on my Ripmo.
Just looking for feedback from anyone who has made the switch, or who at least has time on both bikes to verify that my thinking about the switch lines up with their experience with the bikes, and hopefully to put my fears to rest.
A demo is unfortunately not an option for me, due to location
 

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Currently I'm 205 riding and have a Ripley LS and HD4. I do feel a difference in chunk and rooty runs, but the Ripley shocks me how well it rides. Still takes the odd small to med drop just fine. Don't really notice any flex.

That being said, there are a couple Ripmo riders that are doing the same big days that like the bigger bike for the geometry. They feel safer on the descents.

1. Really hard to gauge what you consider a big aggressive descent. The new Ripley will outgun my LS and my LS stacks up pretty good against my HD4 90% of the time.
2. Don't think you'll notice flex. Just a bit more arm pump, little more reactive, and ride around the big drops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The new geo of the Ripley being almost a carbon copy of the Ripmo is what really has me leaning toward it. Currently, I'll do some ~30' jumps and ~6' drops. I'm kind of leaning toward getting the Ripley and an open face helmet, then steering clear of features that I would want a bigger bike and full-face helmet for lol.
 

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Rollin 29s
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Ripley V4 wasn’t out yet or announced when I got my Ripmo last October, but it may have been the sweet spot Bike I was looking for. I love how the Ripmo rides and handles more than I can throw at it. The fact that it can out climb my old Jet 9, which is closer to an XC bike, but descend and handle chunk like a downhill bike (or close to it) is pretty amazing.

However, I don’t do any of the drops or jumps like you describe. I will hit 2 or 3’ drops or flatter riser jumps of 4’ or so. I’m 50 with much higher life consequences if a bad crash takes me out for 6 months than When I was 22.

The Ripmo has allowed me to clean some downhill sections where I ride with the fastest time for the year, which still stands today, and all-time fastest for my age on Strava. That’s crazy. The Ripmo gets a lot of credit for it.

I am thinking that my next bike may be the Ripley V4, as I am probably not using the Ripmo to its full potential. I’m also interested in reading what others who have ridden both bikes say.


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The new geo of the Ripley being almost a carbon copy of the Ripmo is what really has me leaning toward it. Currently, I'll do some ~30' jumps and ~6' drops. I'm kind of leaning toward getting the Ripley and an open face helmet, then steering clear of features that I would want a bigger bike and full-face helmet for lol.
Yep...I know i'll get shredded for this:

Ripmo will be phased out and the 29r HD5 and Ripley V4 will be left.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yep...I know i'll get shredded for this:

Ripmo will be phased out and the 29r HD5 and Ripley V4 will be left.
I don't think that sounds too crazy. It is a lot like what Santa Cruz has done with their lineup. The current difference between the Ripmo and the Ripley doesn't quite lead me to feel justified owning both of them, so I can certainly imagine the Ripmo transitioning to full enduro, with the Ripley holding down the trail end of the spectrum. If that happened though, I would expect them to keep the Ripmo name for the new Ripmo.

I could also see a situation exactly like what SC did, which would include the Ripley as light trail, Ripmo as all mountain, and then the 29er HD4 as the full on enduro brawler.
 

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I weigh 190 and ride the V4 Ripley in Pisgah several days a week with long epics on many weekends (40-50+ mile days). I also own a GG Smash which is fairly equivalent to the Ripmo capability wise.

The Ripley does a really amazing job handling most of the Pisgah gnar but I do run a Fox 36 at 140mm on it. If you weigh 180+ and ride aggressive in tough terrain I would recommend a a bit bigger fork.

The Smash is certainly more capable at high speeds and bigger drops but I ride the Ripley much more and just dial it back and enjoy the long rides. I am 46 with kids that rely on me, also too many injuries over 25 years mountain biking make the Ripley a better fit for me.

The one problem with the Ripley is it feels really capable and can get you into trouble as it is easy to push it past its comfort zone in really gnarly terrain. Just gotta remind yourself to dial it back a bit and all is good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I weigh 190 and ride the V4 Ripley in Pisgah several days a week with long epics on many weekends (40-50+ mile days). I also own a GG Smash which is fairly equivalent to the Ripmo capability wise.

The Ripley does a really amazing job handling most of the Pisgah gnar but I do run a Fox 36 at 140mm on it. If you weigh 180+ and ride aggressive in tough terrain I would recommend a a bit bigger fork.

The Smash is certainly more capable at high speeds and bigger drops but I ride the Ripley much more and just dial it back and enjoy the long rides. I am 46 with kids that rely on me, also too many injuries over 25 years mountain biking make the Ripley a better fit for me.

The one problem with the Ripley is it feels really capable and can get you into trouble as it is easy to push it past its comfort zone in really gnarly terrain. Just gotta remind yourself to dial it back a bit and all is good.
Thanks for the reply, and I do think it is a super useful comparison because from the numbers and ride reports, the GG Smash and Ripmo are very similar bikes.

Do you find that the Ripley is significantly more playful and poppy off of small features, pumping, and at lower speeds than the smash? The Ripmo is already fun in those situations, but getting even more in those areas would be a key reason for the switch.
 

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Thanks for the reply, and I do think it is a super useful comparison because from the numbers and ride reports, the GG Smash and Ripmo are very similar bikes.

Do you find that the Ripley is significantly more playful and poppy off of small features, pumping, and at lower speeds than the smash? The Ripmo is already fun in those situations, but getting even more in those areas would be a key reason for the switch.
Yes indeed the Ripley is much more playful/poppy than the Smash due to less travel, lighter weight, and shorter wheelbase.

The Smash is into "plowbike" territory while the Ripley is not really that all all. Don't get me wrong, I do like the Smash just fine for its intended purpose but much prefer the Ripley overall for big days out in the woods.

There are only a couple drops here in Pisgah I won't do on the Ripley but is does really great on everything else. I like picking it down fun lines, popping off successive, natural features... it's perfect for this AND climbing is just incredible up long fire roads or steep technical terrain.
 

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Since I got my Ripley V4, I don't know that I'll keep the Ripmo. They're so similar but the Ripley is just more fun for me most of the time. Poppier, faster, and can still handle most of what I'm willing to do (if not all, lol) at 60 yrs old with 5 kids (including twin kindergarteners). And with a 140mm fork, the difference becomes even smaller. They're REALLY similar bikes except for the travel and progressivity of the rear end.
 

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Rollin 29s
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Since I got my Ripley V4, I don't know that I'll keep the Ripmo. They're so similar but the Ripley is just more fun for me most of the time. Poppier, faster, and can still handle most of what I'm willing to do (if not all, lol) at 60 yrs old with 5 kids (including twin kindergarteners). And with a 140mm fork, the difference becomes even smaller. They're REALLY similar bikes except for the travel and progressivity of the rear end.
Great feedback. Sounds like you are in a similar situation to me. If I did the switch, would it make more sense to buy the V4 frame and swap components over or buy complete bike? I would probably sell the Ripmo frame or complete bike.

For 90% of the riding I'm doing, more of a trail bike would be a better fit.

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Great feedback. Sounds like you are in a similar situation to me. If I did the switch, would it make more sense to buy the V4 frame and swap components over or buy complete bike? I would probably sell the Ripmo frame or complete bike.

For 90% of the riding I'm doing, more of a trail bike would be a better fit.

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If you like your build components, it makes more sense (financially) to swap over parts and get a new fork and sell the Ripmo as frame and fork. I would imagine that just about everything would transfer over pretty easily. That said, I have an expensive habit of starting over with new everything with each bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Since I got my Ripley V4, I don't know that I'll keep the Ripmo. They're so similar but the Ripley is just more fun for me most of the time. Poppier, faster, and can still handle most of what I'm willing to do (if not all, lol) at 60 yrs old with 5 kids (including twin kindergarteners). And with a 140mm fork, the difference becomes even smaller. They're REALLY similar bikes except for the travel and progressivity of the rear end.
When you mention the progressivity of the rear end, I'm assuming the Ripley is more progressive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes indeed the Ripley is much more playful/poppy than the Smash due to less travel, lighter weight, and shorter wheelbase.

The Smash is into "plowbike" territory while the Ripley is not really that all all. Don't get me wrong, I do like the Smash just fine for its intended purpose but much prefer the Ripley overall for big days out in the woods.

There are only a couple drops here in Pisgah I won't do on the Ripley but is does really great on everything else. I like picking it down fun lines, popping off successive, natural features... it's perfect for this AND climbing is just incredible up long fire roads or steep technical terrain.
This is all what I figured, and makes me lean pretty heavily toward trying out the change!
 

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I’m making the switch from Ripmo to Ripley, I have a full season on the Ripley LS and 2 seasons now on the Ripmo. I love the Ripmo, so playful and amazing climber. Feels like you can take your hands off the bars in the steep loose stuff it’s so stable. But I do miss a bit of the supe quick pop of the Ripley. Ideally if one both, but I bet if I did I would reach for the Ripley 60% of the time
 

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I've owned a Ripmo for two seasons and spent a couple long rides on a Ripley V4. I was stunned by how different the bikes ride/perform. Given the near-identical geo, I thought they would be more similar than different. I was wrong. The difference between the bikes is not subtle.

The Ripley is a rocket ship. Soooo fast. Much easier to rail corners on XC tracks. Was better working through low-speed tech maneuvers. But, most of all - pop. The Ripley launches off all those little trail features the Ripmo kind of "smooshes" through. I was able to easily clear tabletops and doubles where I can't get enough entry speed on the Ripmo to avoid coming up short.

The trade off is of course, plushness and capability.

My Ripmo is a high-end, light build, with fast-rolling tires. I love it. It's still pretty quick on XC-ish trails and I can smash stuff when I'm riding bigger lines. I'll happily pedal it on a 50-mile day. That said, I have considered doing a frame swap for the V4. Ibis backorders have prevented me from seriously considering it during the season. My plan was to ride the snot out of the Ripmo this year and then make a decision come fall or next spring.

I'll either sell the Ripmo frame and move everything over to the Ripley. Or, i'll keep the Ripmo and add a Pivot Mach 4SL. Need to spend some time on the Pivot before making a decision.
 

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I've owned a Ripmo for two seasons and spent a couple long rides on a Ripley V4. I was stunned by how different the bikes ride/perform. Given the near-identical geo, I thought they would be more similar than different. I was wrong. The difference between the bikes is not subtle.

The Ripley is a rocket ship. Soooo fast. Much easier to rail corners on XC tracks. Was better working through low-speed tech maneuvers. But, most of all - pop. The Ripley launches off all those little trail features the Ripmo kind of "smooshes" through. I was able to easily clear tabletops and doubles where I can't get enough entry speed on the Ripmo to avoid coming up short.

The trade off is of course, plushness and capability.

My Ripmo is a high-end, light build, with fast-rolling tires. I love it. It's still pretty quick on XC-ish trails and I can smash stuff when I'm riding bigger lines. I'll happily pedal it on a 50-mile day. That said, I have considered doing a frame swap for the V4. Ibis backorders have prevented me from seriously considering it during the season. My plan was to ride the snot out of the Ripmo this year and then make a decision come fall or next spring.

I'll either sell the Ripmo frame and move everything over to the Ripley. Or, i'll keep the Ripmo and add a Pivot Mach 4SL. Need to spend some time on the Pivot before making a decision.
That's funny, I feel like my Mach 4SL is further from my Ripley than my Ripley is from my Ripmo. But I have a 100mm fork on my Pivot. But the Ripmo/Mach 4SL combo would be about perfect, pretty much covering everything except pure DH.
 

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No Clue Crew
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Pretty interesting assessment. Where do you spend most of your riding time?

I've owned a Ripmo for two seasons and spent a couple long rides on a Ripley V4. I was stunned by how different the bikes ride/perform. Given the near-identical geo, I thought they would be more similar than different. I was wrong. The difference between the bikes is not subtle.

The Ripley is a rocket ship. Soooo fast. Much easier to rail corners on XC tracks. Was better working through low-speed tech maneuvers. But, most of all - pop. The Ripley launches off all those little trail features the Ripmo kind of "smooshes" through. I was able to easily clear tabletops and doubles where I can't get enough entry speed on the Ripmo to avoid coming up short.

The trade off is of course, plushness and capability.

My Ripmo is a high-end, light build, with fast-rolling tires. I love it. It's still pretty quick on XC-ish trails and I can smash stuff when I'm riding bigger lines. I'll happily pedal it on a 50-mile day. That said, I have considered doing a frame swap for the V4. Ibis backorders have prevented me from seriously considering it during the season. My plan was to ride the snot out of the Ripmo this year and then make a decision come fall or next spring.

I'll either sell the Ripmo frame and move everything over to the Ripley. Or, i'll keep the Ripmo and add a Pivot Mach 4SL. Need to spend some time on the Pivot before making a decision.
 

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trailpimp
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You have to ask the question if the bike will actually make you back it down. Or will you find the limits of the new Ripley frame, and risk overwhelming the chassis. Thereby placing you in a position of going down. With as capable as this new breed of Ripley is, you'll probably need to change your riding area, and not go to the place with 30 foot jumps and 6 foot drops.

(Although if you just want a new bike, go for it! That's half the fun of this sport is trying all the new gear! You can always get another Ripmo)
 
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