Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone set up with 1 X 9 gearing? I did it on light aluminum hard tail, and woul like to try it on the X5. Not so much for weight but the concept and simplicity. The SS mentality creeping in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I ran a 1x9 on my Racer-X and it worked great.

I tried to run a 1x9 on the Salty and it did not work out so well. The suspension being a little more plush and the bike being 2 pounds heavier made the climbing a little too hard for me. Keep in mind that the hills we have here in the Texas hill country are very steep, short but steep none the less. Right now I am running a 2x9 and it works out great. Not nearly as clean but it has to do.

On your climbs just leave your bike in a 1:1 gear and see how it does. So that could be your 32 middle ring up front and you big 32 cog in the back. Not sure what type of climbs you have up there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
I run 1x9 on my Salty for a number of reasons. My current crankset is nearing the end of its useful life and I was looking at new cranks and had to decide if I wanted to stay 1x9 or go back to 2x9. I've decided to stay 1x9 and committed the money. If you go 32x11-34, you can get sub 1:1. There are quick steep hills where I ride and all of the ones I could make on more gears, I can make on the 1x9. There are 2 super steep sections I haven't made yet on any bike, but I'm gunning for them next spring. In most cases, if I miss on the 1x9, I probably would have gotten not more than 5 feet further on a lower gear ratio. I always found it hard to use any gear ratio below about 0.85:1 because 1) you can't steer the bike without fanning because you're moving too slow and 2) most climbs here are filled with rocks so the more times that crank goes around, the more time you have to spend avoiding the rocks by stutter pedaling, etc. which just slows you down and 3) you either loop out or lose traction because of the excessive torque.

Different strokes for different folks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mr. Legs!

steiny said:
I run 1x9 on my Salty for a number of reasons. My current crankset is nearing the end of its useful life and I was looking at new cranks and had to decide if I wanted to stay 1x9 or go back to 2x9. I've decided to stay 1x9 and committed the money. If you go 32x11-34, you can get sub 1:1. There are quick steep hills where I ride and all of the ones I could make on more gears, I can make on the 1x9. There are 2 super steep sections I haven't made yet on any bike, but I'm gunning for them next spring. In most cases, if I miss on the 1x9, I probably would have gotten not more than 5 feet further on a lower gear ratio. I always found it hard to use any gear ratio below about 0.85:1 because 1) you can't steer the bike without fanning because you're moving too slow and 2) most climbs here are filled with rocks so the more times that crank goes around, the more time you have to spend avoiding the rocks by stutter pedaling, etc. which just slows you down and 3) you either loop out or lose traction because of the excessive torque.

Different strokes for different folks.
As long as you can push the gear up that hill. Hat's off to you, I am hoping to do it soon. Remember the lat 80's/ early 1990's when bikes came with 28/38/48 and 11-28 cassettes?
That was hard 15 years ago. What were they thinking the average rider could do with that except push up the hills?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
wyatt said:
As long as you can push the gear up that hill. Hat's off to you, I am hoping to do it soon. Remember the lat 80's/ early 1990's when bikes came with 28/38/48 and 11-28 cassettes?
That was hard 15 years ago. What were they thinking the average rider could do with that except push up the hills?
I wasn't biking regularly at that time but I do remember the 26-36-46/48 and 11-28 in the late 90's.

Just keep riding and your body will adjust by getting stronger and you'll wind up getting faster overall. If you ever go back to a bike with a granny, you'll just climb hills all day and smile as you pass everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I run 1X9 on my '96 steel FSR. Works great even uphill. Fun little around town bike, tried it on a firetrail and almost died! :p
I thought I was the only one out there thinking like this. Funny thing too, the crank and rear der. are Campy, what a trip....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
I still take out my rigid '87 Fisher with 24/36/48 and 12-28 every once in a while and I realize that it formed my riding style (if you can call it that) quite a bit. I'm not a particularly strong or fast climber, but even so, I spend very little time in the granny on typical 26" MTB's, especially on hardtails or rigids. Had to force myself to learn to spin and roll up bumpy climbs on FS bikes instead of mashing, flailing and fighting wheelspin on the way up like on my original Hoo Koo.

Being familiar with both modes makes me think that going 1 x 9 (or better yet, 1 x 4 with a SS hub) wouldn't be too much of a stretch, especially on the commuter 29'er that I am planning. The main concern I have is finding the right crankset/chainring. Being limited to a 38/32 at the low end probably won't be an issue in town, but if I want to load it up and tour a 2 x 4 setup would be preferable.

Have those who have tried 1 x 9 had any trouble keeping the chain on the chainring?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,040 Posts
I ran a

1x8 (8spd by choice) on my 35# RFX. Worked great. I used an e13 chain guide but most are probably fine an nGear Jump Stomp to the inside and a basher. Rohloff makes a nice ST mounted guide as well.

For my El Cap I plan to use a 30T stainless SS ring, an 11/34 cassette, the Jump Stop and the existing basher from my 2x9 set up.

A few less things to go wrong, maintain and/or break.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
Daner said:
Have those who have tried 1 x 9 had any trouble keeping the chain on the chainring?
The only time I have trouble is when I'm in the 34t cog, lean the bike over on the non-drive side, and back pedal. The chain wants to drop off to the inside which starts to derail it from the bottom up. Also, when the chain is worn and needs replaced, I've found it starts to fall off when in the 34t and you pedal backwards on rough terrain. It's actually kind of nice because it tells you when it is time to change the chain.

Performance will depend on how good your chainline is and how tight your chain tension is. The type of chain retention device will also make a difference. I run a Jump Stop. A more solid setup like an E13 SRS system should be pretty much bullet proof, but it comes at a cost (money and weight).
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top