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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm running a half marathon on October 16th. I'm comfortably running up to 7+ miles, but should probably start a more regimented plan for the next 7 weeks.

Anyone have a basic plan I can follow for the next 7 weeks? I really don't like running 6 days a week, mainly because it's hard on my legs (I'm a 33 year old, soon-to-be former clydesdale), it's boring, and I like mountain biking and lifting weights once or twice a week. But then again, I don't want to bonk on race day so I need to do this right.

This is what I'm thinking (any input would be appreciated):

Saturday morning: long run. Add one mile each week for the next 7 weeks, starting this Saturday with an 8 mile run.

Sunday: mountain bike to gym, lift weights for an hour, bike back home.

Monday: Run 1 hour on treadmill (I work, but I have a gym I can utilize at work for lunch).

Tuesday: mountain bike.

Wednesday: Run on treadmill for 1 hour, followed by SPIN class. This is an every Wednesday class which I like to make.

Thursday: weight train at gym, followed by sprints up a staircase out back. About 6 flights of stairs, takes about 20 seconds to get to top.

Friday: off!

Any input would be appreciated. I'm thinking of dropping the weight training for the next 7 weeks, just so I can concentrate on running, but I still love lifting weights!

ps - I've been running regularly since January, so I think I've established a decent "base" for you real technical runners out there.
 

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SuperClyde said:
I'm running a half marathon on October 16th. I'm comfortably running up to 7+ miles, but should probably start a more regimented plan for the next 7 weeks.

ps - I've been running regularly since January, so I think I've established a decent "base" for you real technical runners out there.
Sounds like a good plan! To do a half marathon you only need to be able to run 10 miles - the adrenaline of race day will easily take you through those last 3 miles!

Wow you are making me miss running. What half marathon are you planning on doing?
 

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Impy said:
Sounds like a good plan! To do a half marathon you only need to be able to run 10 miles - the adrenaline of race day will easily take you through those last 3 miles!

Wow you are making me miss running. What half marathon are you planning on doing?
Sounds like a good plan. I agree, I'd build up to 10 miles on my long easy day. The rest of the week I'd alternate bike and run. The shorter runs/bikes would be near planned race intensity, building up to a total of 50% of the run in accumulated race intensity running/biking (bike HR will eb about 8-10 beat per minutes less than equivalent run rate). You don't have to do weights for running, studies have not shown weight trainign to benefit runners, but if you like to do it, consider limiting it to a 45 min session once per week and focussing on a muscular endurance workout with sets of 30-50 reps and 1 min rest between. That way you get an aerobic benefit as well. Remember, for half marathon and full marathon, "base" endurance is about 90% of what you need (that is, longer, slower uns/bikes...no need to go anaerobic in your training very often or at all).
 

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I ran competitevly (at least in my head) for about 15 years and still do a combination of mountain biking, running, kayaking, etc.

I may not be the best person to give advice as I have trained for 3 marathons and got injured all 3 times (twice I didn't make it to the starting line and once I made it to mile 14 with a pulled calf). I have completed several halfs though

Anyway, a combination of running and biking is a great mix. Runners tend to have overpowering hamstrings and biking builds up the quads more so. The two provide a nice balance on the muscle development. I agree that you only need to run 10 miles to be able to complete the half as you can easily push through the last 3 if need be. Make sure you take a step back every few weeks on your long runs. In other words, do two weeks of increasing long runs and then step back a few miles on the third week.

One final point, I don't think I would do stairs 2 days before my long run. I tried to keep high intensity stuff at least 3 days out. Here was a typical week for me marathon training:

Saturday - 5-10 miles (very easy)
Sunday - Long Run - 12-20 (lsd)
Monday - Cross Train (usually bike)
Tuesday - 3 to 5 (easy)
Wednesday 5 to 10
Thursday - Tempo or some sort of speed trainig
Friday - Off

Anyway, good luck with your training and remember that I always got hurt training so if do the exact opposite of what I say your bound to have great success.

Stone
 

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Knight said:
Sounds like a good plan. I agree, I'd build up to 10 miles on my long easy day. The rest of the week I'd alternate bike and run. The shorter runs/bikes would be near planned race intensity, building up to a total of 50% of the run in accumulated race intensity running/biking (bike HR will eb about 8-10 beat per minutes less than equivalent run rate). You don't have to do weights for running, studies have not shown weight trainign to benefit runners, but if you like to do it, consider limiting it to a 45 min session once per week and focussing on a muscular endurance workout with sets of 30-50 reps and 1 min rest between. That way you get an aerobic benefit as well. Remember, for half marathon and full marathon, "base" endurance is about 90% of what you need (that is, longer, slower uns/bikes...no need to go anaerobic in your training very often or at all).
Knight, the 30-50 rep weights you're recommending is usually done in the off season right? (I never got into high rep work any way, why not just run stairs or hills instead?) I have to disagree, don't change your weight workout suddenly, keep doing the same thing you're doing now, then just don't lift the week before your race (you want your energy levels/reserves as high as possible).

I did a Half marathon this April in <89 minutes, and as well as ~2 1/2hr (~27 kms max) long runs through the winter, and lots of interval work in the late winter and early spring, another thing I did was "pace" or "tempo" runs at planned race pace for 40-50 minutes maybe once a week or every other week, the two months before my race, this really helps you get the feel of your race pace. If you have no idea what pace you can run the Half in, the tempo runs will give you a good idea (check your pace when you can, if miles or kms are marked on your pathways). One trick some coaches recommend in the last couple of months before a race is to do the last ~1/4 of your long run at race pace every other week - the fatigue from the first 3/4 of the run is felt near the end, and you'll be better prepared for the race.

BTW, I ride fairly easy the day before I plan to run hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Knight said:
I have found the best source for information on endurance training to be The Triathletes Training Bible. I know there is a Training Bible for Cyclists, too, but the general advice on volume, intensity and periodization is the same.

www.trainingbible.com
Thanks everyone. The main points I've taken from this thus far is that I don't have to build up to much beyond 10 miles (that's a relief!), and to not do high intensity training within two days of my long run. Today I did an hour on the treadmill, it was pretty easy.

I've decided to cut the weight training down to 2 days per week, and I may even do the 1 day a week idea mentioned above.

Finally, today I weighed myself....188lbs. I started the year at 225lbs, so I must be doing something right!

The marathon is the Baltimore Marathon, sponsored by Under Armour, on October 16th. Wish me luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just a quick update - did 11 miles last night, right on schedule. Very hilly, in fact the last 3 miles is nothing but steep long hills. :mad: The Baltimore Marathon course is flat, so this will help that I've trained on big hills for the last few months.

Last night took 1:50, which is good because I was running an unfamiliar route in complete dark and had to pick my way a couple of times, plus the hills slow you down in the end. I'm thinking my half marathon will be done in under 2 hours, which I'm personally ecstatic about.

Weight training is down to 2 days a week, if that. Can't bench 330lbs anymore like I could 8 months ago, but then again I couldn't do 20 pull-ups like I can now, so I guess it's all relative.

I started the year weighing 225lbs. Body weight is now holding at 185lbs....I'm 6'2'', so that's a healthy strong weight for me.

No longer a clydesdale, which I have mixed feelings about - no more top 3 finishes, but maybe some faster racing!

Thanks again for all your input!
 

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Wow nice job on the wieghtloss. I was going to do the United Technologies Greater Hartford Marathon which is next week. I screwed up and started running with crappy shoes and got shin splints. I'm an overpronater on top of it. So I had to abandon my running a few months ago. I've been riding a lot so I'm still in good shape just not for running. I stumbled upon Coolrunning.com. They've got some good info. What I like most about thier site is the training log. I use it for cycling but you can use if for running, walking, cycling, swimming really everything you can think of. You can graph everything from heartrate to milage on specific shoes. Best of all it's free. Good luck and keep running.
 

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I went from hardly doing 5k to full marathon by...

SuperClyde said:
I'm running a half marathon on October 16th. I'm comfortably running up to 7+ miles, but should probably start a more regimented plan for the next 7 weeks.

Anyone have a basic plan I can follow for the next 7 weeks? I really don't like running 6 days a week, mainly because it's hard on my legs (I'm a 33 year old, soon-to-be former clydesdale), it's boring, and I like mountain biking and lifting weights once or twice a week. But then again, I don't want to bonk on race day so I need to do this right.

This is what I'm thinking (any input would be appreciated):

Saturday morning: long run. Add one mile each week for the next 7 weeks, starting this Saturday with an 8 mile run.

Sunday: mountain bike to gym, lift weights for an hour, bike back home.

Monday: Run 1 hour on treadmill (I work, but I have a gym I can utilize at work for lunch).

Tuesday: mountain bike.

Wednesday: Run on treadmill for 1 hour, followed by SPIN class. This is an every Wednesday class which I like to make.

Thursday: weight train at gym, followed by sprints up a staircase out back. About 6 flights of stairs, takes about 20 seconds to get to top.

Friday: off!

Any input would be appreciated. I'm thinking of dropping the weight training for the next 7 weeks, just so I can concentrate on running, but I still love lifting weights!

ps - I've been running regularly since January, so I think I've established a decent "base" for you real technical runners out there.
...largely doing what this guy said. http://www.halhigdon.com/
He stresses doing progressively longer runs on the weekend with every forth slightly less than the previous weekend's and I only ran 3x/week. Your half is coming up soon and if you can run 11 now you will have no problem at all, trust me. My advise is to run once or at most twice the week of the event and not more than three miles. You won't lose anything, you'll be stronger with the rest.
Good luck
J
 

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Good Luck

Good luck on your race. I'm doing a 10K trail race the same day. It sounds like you've done well on your training. I've been running a lot for the last year and have dropped 40 lbs. I'm doing the Santa Clarita marathon on Nov. 7 th. The distance shouldn't be much of a problem as I've done lots of long runs and a 50K. This brings me to my point. Your long run is key to finishing and your shorter faster runs will determine your speed. I've got a lot of long runs in the past but at the expense of my speed. I've been running 70 miles/week but all of that hasn't kept my speed where I want it. I think my marathon will wind up being just a chance for me to get a marathon under four hours so I get a good starting spot for the L.A. marathon in March. In the meen time I'll be going after all the speed I've lost. One more thing, always run easy the day before and after a hard / long run or don't run at all. I wish I could make myself run less and ride more but I'm after some running goals for now. By the way we're about the same age and not even at the tip of running years. I just paced for a guy that's 62 years old at AC100. That's 100 miles. When I met up with him at mile 53 he was running as stong as he always does. I was having to time my words with breathing to talk when I ran with him. He was killing me and had just run 53 miles. Keep up the good work. By the way I ride about once a month and keep up with my riding friends just fine. I'm an areobic workhourse but don't have the right muscles developed to be a great rider too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Final update! The race was very easy today...I finished in 1:50, which is great because my goal was under 2 hours. I reached 8 miles in 1:10, around a 9 minute pace, but finished the last 5.3 miles in 40 minutes, an 8 minute pace which I found encouraging.

I wasn't even nervous, in fact I slept like a baby last night. The week before last I ran 11 miles on both a Sunday and a Thursday, and this week I only ran 6 miles on Monday and 3 on Wednesday, so basically I only ran 4x in two weeks. I felt really fresh and strong today.

Overall the hills were easy, no problem whatsover. I'm looking forward to running the real thing next year at 26 miles, but even better I'm looking forward to some mountain biking next week!

Thanks again for all the input!
 
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