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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys,
During a ride today my 02 Enduro Pro developed a creak that went away when I locked out the shock. I got home and took the shock off and found the lower shock bushing to be bad. I figure I'll put in new rear-suspension bearings at the same time even though they feel fine and have never been changed.
I know some people have used inline skate bearings but I was wondering if anyone had part numbers and places where I could get them?
Also, is there only one size bearing? I'd like to change all of them.
Any tips on getting out the old ones?

Thanks for any help.
Lou.
 

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I HUCK WITH CHUCK
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I had to get them, they were kind of hard to get a hold of in SC. Sunshine cycles hooked me up (but I dont like that shop that much, just doesnt cater to my riding style.) I need new reducer bushings on my enduro, but I just ovalized my headtube, so Its going to specialized anyway.
 

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bearing replacement on enduro

bearing suppliers are the easiest to source them from. tap them out from behind (very carefully), and take them in to the bearing guys with you. nice clean up job before putting the new ones in, little bit of lube around them and carefully tap them back in. make sure you check everything for a few rides, as things may settle in a bit and loosen up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the help, guys.
I just thought I remember seeing someone posting part numbers and an inline skate supplier that had great quality bearings. Of course I can't find it in the archives now. :(

Thanks again.
Lou.
 

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Warp speed, Mr. Sulu!
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This may help

I had posted a similar question on the general discussion board, and I said I would post the information once and if I could get it. The response below was to an e-mail I sent to Specialized Canada regarding the subject.

"Glad to hear that you're enjoying the Enduro that you purchased this fall. It's also refreshing to see that you pay attention to the required service intervals for the components bolted to your frame. Regular preventative maintenance is always easier than repairing/replacing parts when they have failed. However, after reading your message to our website, I think that you may have overlooked some possible causes for the pivot bearing wear on your bike.

The most common cause of Brinneling (indexing) on the bearing races is not the infiltration of water and dirt, and can be attributed to the small degree of rotational movement at the pivots. A sealed cartridge bearing is ideally suited to an application that allows for a full 360 degrees of rotation (like a skateboard wheel). When used on a swingarm or linkage (bike, motorcycle, etc...), bearing rotation around the axis (or axes) is restricted considerably. This causes areas of the inner and outer races to wear at an accelerated rate because of a concentration of loads on a smaller surface area. For this reason, even bearings of the highest possible quality would exhibit signs of wear more readily in this type of application. Improper torque values for the fixing bolts at the pivots is also a common cause for premature failure of the bearings. As are improper washing techniques (ie: blasting a jet of water directly on the pivot). Climate, terrain, riding style and maintenance intervals are also factors to consider. Slighlty notchy bearings will not adversely affect the ride quality of your bike as the rider typically weighs more than the vehicle and the slight decrease in free rotational movement will not be felt.

Realistically, the bearings should last about one season under the average rider. We offer both bearing kits and individual bearings through our dealer network to facilitate service at the shop or consumer level. These bearings are manufactured in Japan, and are of high quality. You can also choose to source these bearings through other channels, but I doubt that you would increase the service interval very much (for the reasons noted in the previous paragraph). I have attached a copy of the service schematic for your '03 Enduro, which includes dimensional data and torque values, as well as an exploded view of the pivots. I hope that this helps out with your maintenance, and also hope that you have a clearer understanding of the myriad causes for bearing failure on a suspension bike.

Regards,

Tony Brisindi
Warranty/Technical Services Manager
Specialized Canada"

If you want the PDF file (almost 1 meg) that he sent me with this letter, I can try to attach it to a post. If that won't work, I can send it to you directly.

Mike
 

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Pucker Factor;
I'm having some bearing issues on my 03 Enduro. I'd greatly appreciate it if you would email the PDF file to me.

bmf at uberfarm dot com

Thanks
 

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hey pucker shoot me an email with that PDF as well please. Thanks!!
Clbrosch*at*vcu.edu

replace *at* with @
 

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All these parts are available through any Specialized dealer, who can order them from Specialized. The kits come with all the spacers and bearing, or bolts/nuts and washers, and they all come with the relevant schematics for the bikes that the parts fit. It makes the job a heck of a lot easier than trying to get each individual bearing size from a general bearing service center, and the washers are too specific to get easily from a hardware store. I don't know of another bike brand that offers as much detailed information on the breakdown of their frames and such an easy way to get all the parts.

They also sell 10-packs of just the bearings, also available through the dealers. Prices are pretty good and they're Japanese quality.
 

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Gromit said:
All these parts are available through any Specialized dealer, who can order them from Specialized. The kits come with all the spacers and bearing, or bolts/nuts and washers, and they all come with the relevant schematics for the bikes that the parts fit. It makes the job a heck of a lot easier than trying to get each individual bearing size from a general bearing service center, and the washers are too specific to get easily from a hardware store. I don't know of another bike brand that offers as much detailed information on the breakdown of their frames and such an easy way to get all the parts.

They also sell 10-packs of just the bearings, also available through the dealers. Prices are pretty good and they're Japanese quality.
hey Gromit (how is Wallace?) What kind of price did you get for the bearing kit and / or the bolt washer kit. My LBS has always been kind of high on their prices. If they are too high I might have to order them from someone else.
thanks Chris
 

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Wallace finally managed to get it on with Wendolyn and took her for a vacation on the moon, thanks for asking.

I don't remember exactly how much they were, but if memory serves me, Enduro bearing and bolt kits are around 50$ per kit. You might be able to find them a bit cheaper, but it'll take some digging. Trouble is, there are a lot of parts. There are 10 bearings and even more spacers, and the spacers are really specific. If you went to a general bearing service place, chances are the bearings alone would cost that and you still don't have spacers (which are dimensionally very specific). And you don't know if you're getting cheap China bearings or not, though that doesn't matter as much since bearings in this type of application tend to wear out quicker anyway. Some of the bearings in the kits are Taiwan bearings, some are not, depending on the amount of load they're subjected to and the quality they have to be as a result.

For the bolts, they're ultra-specific. Custom made alloy bolts, with specific lengths, shoulders, head cap dimensions, etc. There are no substitutions whatsoever. The good news is that these bolts are lighter than generic hardware store steel bolts.

There is another bolt kit available too, it's a full Cr-Mo bolt kit designed for the Enduro SX. They're really cool and ultra strong, but not that necessary under normal Enduro use.

Finally, some dealers will carry the bearing 10-packs, since they're available cheaper from Specialized than just about anywhere else for Japanese quality bearings. These 10-packs are all truly Japanese, they're not a mix, like what you might get in the bearing kits. So if you want just the bearings, find out if a dealer brings them in from Specialized. That's not that big a deal, though.

If you want to make it easy on yourself, go to a big Specialized dealer that does a lot of FSR business, find out what he orders and what he's willing to order. Going straight to the source will be the easiest way to get all the parts you need, to be assured that you're not getting the wrong parts, getting the schematics and knowing you're getting Specialized's buying power and knowledge of their own bikes.
 

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Gromit said:
Wallace finally managed to get it on with Wendolyn and took her for a vacation on the moon, thanks for asking.

I don't remember exactly how much they were, but if memory serves me, Enduro bearing and bolt kits are around 50$ per kit. You might be able to find them a bit cheaper, but it'll take some digging. Trouble is, there are a lot of parts. There are 10 bearings and even more spacers, and the spacers are really specific. If you went to a general bearing service place, chances are the bearings alone would cost that and you still don't have spacers (which are dimensionally very specific). And you don't know if you're getting cheap China bearings or not, though that doesn't matter as much since bearings in this type of application tend to wear out quicker anyway. Some of the bearings in the kits are Taiwan bearings, some are not, depending on the amount of load they're subjected to and the quality they have to be as a result.

For the bolts, they're ultra-specific. Custom made alloy bolts, with specific lengths, shoulders, head cap dimensions, etc. There are no substitutions whatsoever. The good news is that these bolts are lighter than generic hardware store steel bolts.

There is another bolt kit available too, it's a full Cr-Mo bolt kit designed for the Enduro SX. They're really cool and ultra strong, but not that necessary under normal Enduro use.

Finally, some dealers will carry the bearing 10-packs, since they're available cheaper from Specialized than just about anywhere else for Japanese quality bearings. These 10-packs are all truly Japanese, they're not a mix, like what you might get in the bearing kits. So if you want just the bearings, find out if a dealer brings them in from Specialized. That's not that big a deal, though.

If you want to make it easy on yourself, go to a big Specialized dealer that does a lot of FSR business, find out what he orders and what he's willing to order. Going straight to the source will be the easiest way to get all the parts you need, to be assured that you're not getting the wrong parts, getting the schematics and knowing you're getting Specialized's buying power and knowledge of their own bikes.
Thanks!!!!!!!!
 

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Always Breaking Stuff
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Bearing Removal

Hey All,
I didn't notice anyone ever answer part of Lou's origional question about "Any tips on getting out the old ones?" I'm having the same issue. They are pressed in from both sides, and there is a ridge in the middle so you can't press them through. Can anyone tell me how to pop the old ones out?

I did X-post this question to the tooltime forum too, so flame away if you feel it necessary.

-Jon
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
thorir said:
Hey All,
I didn't notice anyone ever answer part of Lou's origional question about "Any tips on getting out the old ones?" I'm having the same issue. They are pressed in from both sides, and there is a ridge in the middle so you can't press them through. Can anyone tell me how to pop the old ones out?

I did X-post this question to the tooltime forum too, so flame away if you feel it necessary.

-Jon
I haven't changed my bearings but I did take out the outer seals, spray the bearings with wd-40, and pack them with grease before putting the seals back on. I still have one bearing that "feels" rough but the suspension is much better now.

Someone mentioned that Specialized might void the warranty if you tried to change those bearings on your own and damage the stays so when it's time I'll let the shop do it.

Lou.
 

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The dropout bearings are not easy to take out. Right now the only realistic way to remove the bearings is with a flathead screwdriver, a mallet, a bench vise, some patience and light tapping around the inner circumference of the bearing. Careful when putting the dropout in a vise, naturally.

Once one's out, it's easier from there. I've done it, generally it's no problem, though it is possible to land on a super-tight bearing once in a while. They're press fit, but on rare occasions they can be tough.

Theoretically, the warranty is void if worked on by someone other than an authorized dealer, but realistically, as long as the mechanic is competent, there should be little problem. They don't encourage home mechanics, but they're not inhuman, irrational people.
 

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Resolved!

Thank you Gromit!

That was almost exactly what I ended up doing last night. Only I used a punch instead of a screw driver because I didn't need to save the bearings, as I picked up 4 new 688RS bearings locally, but I did need to recover the spacer out of the middle. Everything went really well.

As for the warranty I'm not super concerned, the guys at the LBS where I bought my bike all knew exactly what I was doing and were supportive and helpful as always.

Once again, thanks for your help everyone, my issue is resolved!

-Jon

Gromit said:
The dropout bearings are not easy to take out. Right now the only realistic way to remove the bearings is with a flathead screwdriver, a mallet, a bench vise, some patience and light tapping around the inner circumference of the bearing. Careful when putting the dropout in a vise, naturally.

Once one's out, it's easier from there. I've done it, generally it's no problem, though it is possible to land on a super-tight bearing once in a while. They're press fit, but on rare occasions they can be tough.

Theoretically, the warranty is void if worked on by someone other than an authorized dealer, but realistically, as long as the mechanic is competent, there should be little problem. They don't encourage home mechanics, but they're not inhuman, irrational people.
 
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