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In the 90's it used to be called "snowflake lacing"

The wheels sacrifice strength for this pattern.

Wheels are also slightly heavier as longer spokes are used to still reach the rims and keep the shape.
 

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yeah, the snowflake pattern relys on the cross/twist to supply the tension to both spokes. If one spoke therefore breaks (regaldless of where and how), then the tension is lost on two spokes in the exact same area.

With a normally laced wheel, you can quickly loosen the tension of adjacent spokes to allow the bike to be carefully ridden home. Because however the tension is lost from two spokes in the same position/same side, this will most probably not be possible and the rim can find its way directly into the trash!

Shame though....does look nice.
 

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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At best, the loss/gain of strength is 1 whopping percent. Nobody has ever actually measured them scientifically but anecdotal evidence from people with longterm usage of them (and the pattern of twist-lacing goes back to the BMX racing world in the 1970s) is that they work as well as any conventionally crossed wheel at worst, and slightly stiffer/stronger at best.

I've twisted dozens of my wheels since 1993 (and in fact, my latest 650B wheelbuild is twisted) and I've never had a spoke failure in that time result in the other spoke loosing so much tension that a few turns on the spoke wrench didn't straighten the wheel out. Hell, i've had a total of TWO incidents with twisting requiring readjustment of the wheel. One was a nipple crack failure, the other was a rock impact of a previously bent twisted-spoke (the bend was from a stick thru the wheel which mangled the derailleur and hanger). Neither ended my ride, and in fact the wheel hardly moved at all even when one of the spokes did loose its tension as a result. Certainly less movement than I've seen in a conventional cross-laced wheel that has had a spoke/nipple failure of one spoke. Also contrary to popular myth among the pattern's detractors... the other paired spoke won't magically untwist itself from the spoke its wrapped with if one should fail, and also you do not need to replace them in pairs if you do suffer a failure. You simply unwrap the broken one and wrap a new one in its place.

As to the weight gain... wow.... 4mm longer spokes (for a double-twist). That is so gonna be noticed. It amounts to a whopping 4 grams maybe in the case of 14g spokes on a 32H wheel. Less if you're using butted spokes.
 

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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hey people can use them or not. i've got a solid track record with twist lacing.
 

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yorkshire mud monkey
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186 Posts
snow flake ones if done right are very strong i had them laced to old makic 321 rims and they were bomb proof, have them again if the same guy was still in the bike trade.
both front and rear were done on both sides.could do with someone in uk to give me a price on a pair of them.
 

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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Mike T. said:
At least I don't use paperback romance novels :D
it was a hardy boys actually... i've since moved onto a 2 1/2 pound sand filled rubber mallet.
 
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