Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,381 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Think about it.

No brake dive. Complete stable platform.

Lightweight.

and you still have the rear suspension to take bumps!


Any thoughts? I was looking to find a long rigid fork for my DH rigid build. Thought it would be funny to put it onto my suspension frame and see how it rides.

Any thoughts on a good LONG 550 AtoC rigid fork? :cool:
 

·
DIRTYAMERICAN
Joined
·
334 Posts
:confused: Why? :confused:

You want your front tire to maintain contact with the ground more than the rear wheel. And brake dive doesn't seem like a legitimate issue to give up the importance of front suspension. That is cool that you're thinking outside the box but I don't think you will be improving your bikes capabilities. You also shouldn't be THAT weight conscious with a DH bike. Rear suspension is a luxury when riding downhill, but not a necessity--you should always be riding smooth enough that your legs work as additional suspension and dampening.

I don't think you'll like it. Honest opinion.
 

·
All 26.5" all the time!
Joined
·
1,855 Posts
SpawningGround said:
Think about it.

No brake dive. Complete stable platform.

Lightweight.

and you still have the rear suspension to take bumps!


Any thoughts?
Cannondale did back in the early 90's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,381 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
jdude said:
:confused: Why? :confused:

You want your front tire to maintain contact with the ground more than the rear wheel. And brake dive doesn't seem like a legitimate issue to give up the importance of front suspension. That is cool that you're thinking outside the box but I don't think you will be improving your bikes capabilities. You also shouldn't be THAT weight conscious with a DH bike. Rear suspension is a luxury when riding downhill, but not a necessity--you should always be riding smooth enough that your legs work as additional suspension and dampening.

I don't think you'll like it. Honest opinion.
Actually I've kinda tried it before and liked it.

I locked out the Pike at 140mm on my 6 inch rear suspension frame. I think front suspension is a little over rated when you have big fat heavy DH tires for grip.

I'm looking to build a lightweight DH hardtail with a rigid fork. Mainly just so I can get better at riding my dual suspension. Ever since going to full squish I've become lazy in my foot work.

Added bonus? Well I could yank the front wheel up instantly to get over stumps and logs. I would have a tall fork that never dives in steep and slow sections.

and..... I can get good enough to pass dual suspension guys on it. That's gotta feel good! :D
 

·
Fo' Bidniz in da haus
Joined
·
17,282 Posts
with that axle to crown length.....you would have to go custom I bet. even typical suspension corrected 29er forks arent near that length.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,381 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
what about those dual crown forks made for street cruiser bikes? Anyone know where to find those?

If they can handle a near flat 50deg HA, then I think it could hold up to a little bit of off roading, n'est pas?


 

·
Mantis, Paramount, Campy
Joined
·
4,726 Posts
Klein Mantra Too

The Mantra was designed to be used with a rigid fork. Too bad when Trek took over they started shipping them with suspension forks.
 

·
Fo' Bidniz in da haus
Joined
·
17,282 Posts
i hope you are not serious bro! those would likely snap like a twig after a real ride.

just for fun you should contact Walt at Waltworks or some of the other killer custom frame/rigid fork builder to see if they think it is even theoretically possible. It is gonna cost you money for something like that but I say go for it if you are serious and think it will be fun.

cheers
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
226 Posts
Do it

I don't think it will be worth a ****, but you never know unless you try it. Maybe fill the fork legs with cement? :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I've never actually gone rigid up front, but I do something similar all the time by completely locking out my front fork while climbing and descending really technical terrain. This only works well if you're going really slow, like less than 7 MPH or so. It makes for a very predictable front end that doesn't dive at all, and is easier to lift over obstacles, while at the same time maintaining good traction in the back.

Once you start to get moving you're going to want suspension front and back. The rigid fork will tend to buck you back when you hit hard obstacles, which will compress the rear suspension more than usual. It's a weird feeling. I suppose you could get used to it but I don't like it, and at any decent speed I wouldn't consider it an advantage.

If you decide to do this I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on the ride.
 

·
Samsonite Tester
Joined
·
3,993 Posts
When hammering corners DH fast guys typically use lots of front brake. To brake late going into corners. 80% of your brake power is in the front. When getting that power your weight is shifted over the front wheel. Hence the brake dive and flipping otb. While your weight is up front there is no lifting the front end while maintaining traction. So you have to ride with as loose of grip as possible while squeeezing brake lever. Not easy to do and you wind up gripping the bar tight and slamming your hands in the bumps useing arms to absorb. But again that is tough to stay loose in the arm while tight in the fist.

You will be slowwer while rigid in the front , if not you will be out of control with loss of traction.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top