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With bright LEDs so cheap it seems like the number of strobe lights I have to deal with on a fall/winter commute have increased exponentially. A lot of my route is either dark unlit bike path or lightly travelled rural road. The strobes are super hard on my eyes and kill my night vision until I've got some time to recover...about which time the next strober comes along. :madman:

I keep my lights on solid - heck my front light won't strobe because it's german and that's illegal there. It's easy to see me and it's easier for me to see what's ahead with a solid light beam.

Is it just me getting cranky with old age or have other people noticed the rise of the strober as well? :confused:
 

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I'm perfectly fine with blinkies and LEDs set to strobe (I'll set my LED to strobe myself at dawn or dusk). But yeah, some guys do seem to feel safer setting their 500 lumen front light to the most "visible" strobe setting possible at pitch dark. Seems a little too much for me (and I think it makes it harder to see the potholes), but to each his own.
 

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I'm with ya. It would be nice if they pointed them away from my face at least. If I set my light to strobe it makes me want to puke. I have no idea how they manage.
 

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I see more out there this time of year. It is still nice enough for the hardy fair weather commuters to ride but gets dark early. I find them extremely annoying especially on the MUPs. I hate being blinded and then trying to maneuver around pedestrians/joggers on the bike path. Luckily I only have to deal with them for a short stretch near downtown since that is the most crowded part of my route. I console myself with the thought that once the snow flies they will all be gone.
 

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Funny that you say that, some guy started screaming at me because of mine yesterday when I was behind him in traffic. Flashing lights grab people's attention far more than solid lights, and bike lights, even if they have the same light output as automotive lights, are less visible because the smaller area. Additionally, bike taillights have MUCH narrower beam patterns than car taillights. Lastly, cars have lights visible from every direction. We'd need at least 4 lights strategically placed for that, which isn't easy.

Personally, I aim my taillights right at cars. I usually have one on flashing mode and one on solid. Those are taillights though, so a really bright one is what, like 75 lumens? Not nearly as bad as cars with headlights that aren't properly aimed, which is most cars.

My headlight usage depends on the weather and time of day. Yesterday it was dismal in my area, rain and very cloudy and there was a lot of traffic, so I had my light flashing. A car with halogen lights has 2000+ lumens of headlight output and HIDs or LEDs are 3500+. My headlight is 600 lumens, not nearly visible enough on solid mode IMO. I also don't like to aim it up at people's faces because there's no cutoff. I aim it slightly down, more so when it's flashing.

Ultimately I think the issue is when people aim them straight ahead.
 

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I'm a strober. Yep, and 500 lumens at that.

But here's the rub, I don't run it that way all the time. On the MUP, I run it steady on the lowest setting. I also aim my light downward so it puts a hot spot on the ground a couple bike lengths ahead of me. It's shining in nobody's face, but it's plenty visible. Aim is key. That hasn't been much of an issue for me lately. Until about 2 weeks ago, the MUP's closed around 9. We JUST got hours extended to midnight on a provisional 90 day basis. Hopefully that gets made permanent, because the push is for actual 24 hour access in the future.

I find the strobe to be especially effective when there's a lot of ambient light. Either from other traffic, storefront and parking lot lights, streetlights, or all of the above. Also when it's simply foggy and visibility is down. On steady, it's easy to ignore a bike headlight. On a dark, empty road, probably not. In that case, I want to see more than be seen. But being that I live/ride in the city most of the time, this is not an actual need of mine most of the time.

My main taillight is about 200 lumens, on an irregular flash, not the rapid strobe of the headlight (which looks more like a pulse from the front). I run a second rear blinkie on the back of my helmet.
 

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Umm, just look away for a minute? I point my strobe down when I am on the MUP. When I am driving, the bikes I see first have blinky lights.
 

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I'm with ya, on a path solid is the only acceptable mode. There's no point to strobe, the paths are generally narrow in comparison to streets and we're the brightest things on the path. No one is going to miss my solid head light.

I'm not a fan of the strobes on the street, I try to buy lights that have more of an oscillation or flicker than an all out strobe. I mentioned the cygolite 500 before with its nice ripple/flicker and the L&M Vis 180 tail light has a nice oscillation mode. Its always on and goes from high to medium.
 
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I use a strobe rear (sometimes more than one) and solid front unless I'm on a roadway. We've lost two cyclists and put three more in the hospital since school started (city of 250K) so more is probably safer right now although at least two drivers were drunk and one cyclist died from a collision with another cyclist. On the bike path I use solid, off-set my light to the right and shield it when passing another runner or cyclist.
 

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I'm a strober. In the day. Yep, and 500 lumens at that. (On the helmet).

But here's the rub, I don't run it that way all the time. At night, I run it steady on the highest setting. I also aim my lights carefully so they put hot spots on the ground a couple bike lengths out to 100' ahead of me. My lights are shining in nobody's face, but they are plenty visible. Aim is key. That hasn't been much of an issue for me. Until about 2 weeks ago, there was no MUP in town. We JUST got one that doesn't go anywhere I want to go. Hopefully that gets made bigger and useful, because the push is for a bigger one in the future.

I find the strobe to be especially effective in the day. We don't have a lot of ambient light at night either from other traffic, storefront and parking lot lights, streetlights, or all of the above. Also when it's simply foggy and visibility is down. On steady, it's easy to ignore a bike headlight. On a dark, empty road, probably not. Especially with one on the helmet and two at head tube height. In that case, I want to see more than be seen. But being that I live/ride outside the city most of the time, this is an actual need of mine most of the time. I have met one cyclist at night in 6 years. So drivers are a much bigger concern as they are not expecting a cyclist.

My main taillight is about 200 lumens, Over 180 degrees visibility on steady, a HotShot on the seat tube on pulse or maybe throb? I run a second blinkie on the back of my helmet (PB Turbo).
 

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I use a strobe rear (sometimes more than one) and solid front unless I'm on a roadway. We've lost two cyclists and put three more in the hospital since school started (city of 250K) so more is probably safer right now although at least two drivers were drunk and one cyclist died from a collision with another cyclist. On the bike path I use solid, off-set my light to the right and shield it when passing another runner or cyclist.
That is exactly what i do on the mup, too. I do strobe on the street though, but not full strobe.

@Kenthekona, I use a cygolite 360 and cygolite really does have an agreeable ripple light. Perfect for the dusk hours and overcast days.
 
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That is exactly what i do on the mup, too. I do strobe on the street though, but not full strobe.

@Kenthekona, I use a cygolite 360 and cygolite really does have an agreeable ripple light. Perfect for the dusk hours and overcast days.
Cygolite 420 same setting. The full strobe is probably best reserved for foggy weather or other tough lighting conditions.
 

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My commute is entire city so I run my front and rear lights on strobe pretty much all the time, as my only goal is to catch the attention of motorists and I find a solid light in the city is easy to ignore. On the rare occasion I ride anywhere at night when I can't see the road well, I run my headlight on solid.

I also don't see much of a point to running a strobe on a MUP. Not an issue for me personally, but I can see why people would be annoyed by that.
 

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ha I have a new palight that has two LED and, each socket has an independent switch and strobe. I am gonna play with bright on one, and strobe on the other, and mix it all up. haters gonna hate

PS: I am in favor of no strobe, ever. except daytime city traffic.
 

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I too find oncoming strobes extremely annoying. I do run my rear light on flash. But I use my front light to see as well as be seen. I am also pretty anal about aiming my lights so that I can see obstacles on the path and to keep glare away from oncoming cyclists.
 

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I want to do an experiment using front LED's. When you run them full wide open they are switched "on", constant. When you step the brightness down, they're not actually stepping down the voltage, but they are very rapidly strobing. Strobing so fast you can't notice it with your eyes but you CAN notice it in certain circumstances most notably/easily is when it's raining or snowing. Try it!

When it's dark, step your LED down to any setting lower than full brightness and even spray some water in front of the light beam.

I'd like to know, especially during the daytime if it registers more readily subconsciously when it is strobing though it appears visually less bright.
 

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I don't run my front blinker on the MUP, but my rear will be going usually. Once I am on the regular street, the front then goes on. No need on the MUP here at least. Rear it is just easier to turn it on when I leave and not chance forgetting to turn it on.
 
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