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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
So I studied the crap out of reviews/forums on here before I bought new tires, and I came to the conclusion that minions would be a good fit for me. I have the DHR/DHF combo in 2.5" I've been trying to like these tires for a couple of months, but I just can't trust them around tight dusty corners. They wash out leaving me near crashing.:madman: I know most people love them. I've narrowed the problem down to a few things, and I would appreciate your feedback.

1. I have them in the hardest durometer(60a). Perhaps this is not sticky enough to keep traction.

2. Are they made for a wetter climate? I live in southern Utah, and we get a pretty good mix of everything(depending on the day). It seems that they really only have problems on dry stuff.

3. I need to work on my cornering technique. (I've ridden for nearly ten years, and I am pretty smooth. I love to rail corners. I just have a hard time thinking that the problem is purely technique. However It could be the case.)

I'm also thinking about something different, that would be good in all conditions. I am more on the dh side of all mountain. I am thinking nevegals, or maybe ardents. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated! Sorry this is long, I just want it to be clear! THanks in advance!!
 

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I came from Nevegals, but I much prefer the Minions in 2.35 60A, I dislike the Nevegals in every way to Minions other than their volume, and it's dry here mostly.

One thing I did notice once was that when I came from WTB Prowlers which are very good tires and well stiped with uniform knobs and went to High Rollers and hated them, especially in the wet and still think they are bad climbers, (sketchy with a nasty dead-zone I thought at the time). Then this summer I went back on the same set of High Rollers from Minions and quite liked them.:rolleyes:

I have a theory, basically if you don't like Minions and High Rollers this is because you are gradually introducing your bike to the corner slowly and are leaning your bike and maybe even leaning off the inside like a motogp or WSBK rider which gets you around the corner quickly on tires with smaller knobs as your weight is more on the inside of the corner. Minions and High Rollers seem to need to be thrown into the corner more aggressively like motocross style and they seem to like you to use the canting technique where you don't lean your body into the corner but force the larger more aggressive knobs into the terrain using your body-weight from above and exploit this grip to go around the corner fast.

One thing is though, Minions and High Rollers both seem sketchy at slow speeds, they seem to need speed to bite.

I'd give it a bit longer, given the amount of people that love the Minions and use them worldwide can't all be wrong including world champions.:thumbsup:
 

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Like Lew states, you need to really lay these over to appreciate them. Most who dislike them are the XC types who steer by turning the bars. Also the DHR is useless - use DHF's front AND back at low pressures (25 fr, 28 rr). I use 42 duro front and 60 rear and never EVER wash out in the sandiest/driest conditions (Bend, OR is classic for that). Also make sure you're bars are low enough to weight the front tire - I see a lot of newbs with huge stack heights under their stems and/or high rise bars that wonder why they wash out all the time. Also the DHF's knobs are very aggressive for braking - if you're on your front brake AT ALL in the corner you are going trail surfing! Use the front brake hard BEFORE entering the turn.
Having said all that, the Muddy Mary from Schwalbe is flat out a better tire for multi-condition AM/FR riding. If you wash out with those you may as well give up!

Have FUN!

G MAN
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Both answers make alot of sense to me. I have my bars pretty low. I think I could continue to work on technique. I understand the importance of leaning the bike over, and counter steering to hit a corner at a proper angle. (the bike leaning, not turning the wheel.) some of the trails I ride are really windy, and tight, and there isn't always room to get the bike layed over all of the way. Do you fellas have any advice in what would help the tires in this case??
 

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Both answers make alot of sense to me. I have my bars pretty low. I think I could continue to work on technique. I understand the importance of leaning the bike over, and counter steering to hit a corner at a proper angle. (the bike leaning, not turning the wheel.) some of the trails I ride are really windy, and tight, and there isn't always room to get the bike layed over all of the way. Do you fellas have any advice in what would help the tires in this case??
You have to be ready for that random slip @ half lean. Or get a front tire w/ transition knobs.

I went to Muddy Mary in front as well. Got sick of all the off camber slip on DHF. Great tire, too expensive though
 

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Both answers make alot of sense to me. I have my bars pretty low. I think I could continue to work on technique. I understand the importance of leaning the bike over, and counter steering to hit a corner at a proper angle. (the bike leaning, not turning the wheel.) some of the trails I ride are really windy, and tight, and there isn't always room to get the bike layed over all of the way. Do you fellas have any advice in what would help the tires in this case??
I called tires without transition blocks, like the Minion, "gap tooth". They can offer great corning grip--once you get the bike over on the edge.

If your technique is to progressively lean the bike over, gap tooth tires do not work well. They have a spot where they are squirrelly and lack feedback (also a problem if you ride lightly off camber trails).

These tires need to be tossed into the corner. From upright directly to the edge blocks. Then they grab hard.
 

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FRidekid said:
there isn't always room to get the bike layed over all of the way. Do you fellas have any advice in what would help the tires in this case??
Hmm, I say less counter-steering more front wheel short-sharp squeeze (not a grab though) on the front brake to un-weight the rear before the corner and throw the rear end around more. If you can endo think about that style.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@ lew
So, just for my understanding, You are saying to unweight the rear wheel, and give a light tap to the front brake to get it the back around to spin around? I just didn't fully understand your advice.
 

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I would say heavy front wheel braking in a straight line, but a progressive hard squeeze as you would to endo, but be careful you don't grab at the front brake or you will get a front wheel skid and could lose control. This will un-weight the back wheel, then quickly lean or throw the bike over onto its side knobs when the bike is at the correct speed for the corner using your body-weight to force those knobs into the ground, some might be tempted to grab some rear brake to flick the back end around ;), but many other riders would say that that could damage the trail. :nono:

IMO leaning your weight off the inside bike and counter-steering is not at all bad technique, and the reason that you can't get on with Minions isn't because you are a girlie XC rider! It is the bread and butter of road motorcycle riding and racing, and even riding MTB on hard-pack and tires with different patterns. I've been using this technique for years on road motorcycles. 'Come into the corner squeeze hard on the front brake which will also un-weight the rear wheel come off the front brake a little and let the suspension settle down, lean the bike in and get off the inside of the bike with your body-weight and knee-down if on a track, whilst progressively braking less until the apex (trail braking) and cracking the throttle open just past the apex and progressively winding on more throttle'.

It would seem that the 'chucking it in' technique is the winner for riding DH style courses as this is what I see the pros doing on Freecaster and in DH videos, but the 'inside-weighted counter-steer lean' has its place.
 

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some of the trails I ride are really windy, and tight, and there isn't always room to get the bike layed over all of the way. Do you fellas have any advice in what would help the tires in this case??
Yup. Do you ski or snowboard? If so then you understand the need to weight and unweight fast to make consecutive tight turns. Same with a bike. Use your whole body to weight the front and back tires visualizing pushing the tires into the the beginning of the turns. At the apex you unweight hard and fast and prepare for the next turn in the same way by weighting hard again. With practice you can do this fast enough even with tires that require aggressive leans like the DHF - you will become WAY faster!

Have FUN!

G MAN
 

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Do you fellas have any advice in what would help the tires in this case??
Tip the bike in on a turn, over exaggerate the tip in and ride on top of the lean, light on the handlbars, heavy on the feet.

If a drift does happen, when the traction catches - the bike pops up into your standard cornering position. Quite safe.

Using this technique also helps big bikes navigate turny XC trails much easier as tipping the bike engages what the bike was engineered to do... turn.

And you ride with those great side knobs loaded up for gription :D

Thank Lee McCormick for these.
Get his book - I've ridden since the 70's (BMX) and his techniques took me to a whole new level.
Lee Likes Bikes

Here he is demonstrating (exaggerated):


P
 
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