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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm ordering an Orbea Rise M10 to check out something a little lighter weight and to have as a backup bike but these won't be available until next year. In the meantime, I was thinking about buying a non-motorized lightweight downcountry bike.

For people who own and ride both, do you find it difficult riding a regular bike after an ebike?
 

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Only if I ride my e-bike only for a while do I notice how much harder a regular bike is. Don't listen to the nay-sayers, e-bikes are fantastic supplemental toys to regular bikes. You can ride that hard, climby, techie trail on an "easy" day with an e-bike. You can go on long trips in the mountains and ride every day and have fun without having to have days off or "recovery" days or feel beaten down. The know-it-alls will say "just ride more". Screw that, I ride plenty, probably more than most or all of them. I just got back from Crested Butte where I rode the bike park, Dr Park, and Teocalli Ridge in successive days. Those climbs (esp. Teo, dayum!) would have been torture on a regular bike, but on an e-bike it kept me fresh as a daisy for the downhills so I could enjoy them with plenty of energy and focus.

And BTW, great bike that Rise. Rides much more like a regular bike than some of those 50+-pound behemoths.
 

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I have a Levo SL and a couple of regular bikes. The elevation, distance, and riding partner dictate which bike I choose. If riding lots of elevation or with my buddies the SL is my choice. If riding the greenway, gravel or alone the regular bikes are my go to. We also have some trails here that do not have a lot of elevation, and they are more fun on a regular bike. Some months the ebike is ridden almost exclusively, and other times it's a more even split. I would say this year was a 65/45 split favoring the ebike. I just had shoulder surgery, so my riding year is likely done but the recovery riding will be mainly the regular bikes as they are easier to handle. Good luck with what ever you decide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I already have a Heckler MX which I absolutely love. I’m looking for a secondary bike. The Heckler got me riding everyday and highly interested in the sport. If I don’t ride I actually miss it. It’s weird how quickly the saddle can feel like home

Initially was riding mostly in trail mode, powering up and down in the biggest gears. Now I’m always in eco mode and I make more judicious use of the gears. I’m wondering how much more difficult a regular bike will be. I’m going to try and demo a few “analog” bikes on the same trails to get a first hand perspective however it’s nice to get some insights from those riders that have both.
 

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I ride year round here in Anchorage (about 260 days per). Summer is a mix of flat bar road bike, hardtail XC bike, and FS e-bike (80% regular, 20% e-bike). For winter I have given up my regular fat-bike completely and now use an e-fat with front fork and 40mm suspension seat post, which changed everything dramatically in terms of being able to ride a lot more often in bad conditions and resulted in many, many more miles and days.

I don't really notice that big a change in going from e-bike to regular unless I have ridden the e-bike for many days straight. In the summer when I use it every fourth or fifth ride I don't really notice it at all. These forums have been beaten to death with factual and not-so-factual info on health benefits, moral dilemma's, etc., but at this point I just love the fact the use of e-bikes have just given me that many more ride days a year - which in turn brings me greater joy.

To the OP - I would also leave you with this; understand that there will be a difference when coming off sustained e-bike time, and just allow your body and cadence to adjust. You will notice it most when trying to accelerate, so just ease into it. You may also want to think about your gearing if that helps.
 

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E-bikes are fun, thought handling on a 40+lb bike just sucks (especially on the really techy sections), and progressively gets worse. Mine weighs under 46 lbs which is light for a full-power e-bike. That is the primary reason I got it instead of the others...a bit lighter. The Rise and Levo SL are more my style since I don't really enjoy riding e-bikes on trails on full power. The lighter bikes handle much better and give you a more realistic mountain biking experience. On the downhills and pretty much any techy sections, I prefer being on my regular bike. On the climbs, I do suffer more. I was quite shocked at my loss of power. Anyway, if I had to have just one bike, I'd always pick a short travel 29er. The e-bike is more of a novelty, and an enjoyable one that sucks the power out of me. :D
 

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Yep, like others have said, you'll definitely feel like you're riding in molasses when you first get back on your regular bike after a few days on the e-bike. I adjust pretty quickly but I ride much much more analog than "e"-miles and have been doing so for 20+ years, so that feeling is pretty ingrained. I'm 95% analog and 5% e-bike.
 

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I'm on both... was probably 70% ebike, 30% hardtail. Now I bought a new monster truck pedal bike and I'm probably 90% pedal 10% ebike.

Whenever I rode my ebike, I was always pushing hard, so I didn't really notice a loss of power in my legs. I did find myself trying to spin at a much faster cadence and trying to maintain a faster pace on the pedal bike up hills. I had to mentally force myself to chill out a little bit so I didn't blow up on the first climb.
 

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In the meantime, I was thinking about buying a non-motorized lightweight downcountry bike.
This is my current combo, I bought a SC Tallboy at the beginning of the season. Having a regular bike that is light and playful and reasonably enjoyable to climb with makes a nice pairing with an e-bike. It won't feel like such a pig when you switch to it from the e-bike like a big beefy enduro bike does.
 

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I do not find it harder when I ride me regular bike. I bought my Levo SL last August and ride it 30% of the time. Kind of wish I had bought the more powerful Levo, as I’ve recently demo’d the gen 2 and 3 Levos. Yes, they are 10 lbs heavier, but with twice the power and battery range I could do laps easier. Super fun to climb and descend with. Go big or go home!
 

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Once I started riding ebikes my normal bike just sits in the shed all alone and sad. (Anyone want a like-new Enduro with only a few rides? It’s for sale). It’s less of a fitness thing, and more so after being on an ebike, and only riding with other ebikes, a normal bike feels so slow and sluggish. On climbs i just fantasize how many miles i could have already done on an ebike. Everytime I jump on someone else’s normal bike I have to remind myself that the tires aren’t flat and the brakes aren’t rubbing.


Also I’m hypersensitive to geo/sizing changes on bikes, so going back and forth doesn’t work well for me. For example at a race last year I though my bars were a little low for the terrain. I added a 2.5mm spacer under the stem and then the bike felt unrideable to me with that much change. True story. Also the guy that wants more click on suspension because I can feel the difference between individual clicks and want smaller adjustment.
 
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