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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Built my first frame- as all of you know, it's been a tedious process with lots of learning along the way, but I've enjoyed it overall. A buddy (thanks feldybikes!) who has built several gave me the tubeset, but the chain stays were bent and probably not the best for a road bike (or not the best for a road bike + newbie). I thought I measured and clearance was going to be fine, but, alas, it is not.

Shy of using some crazy long BB and having a wacked out chain line, is there any way to save this? Possible to dimple it after everything's all together? If so, possible to do it without buying/ making some crazy mandrels or the like? Looking for a way to save it, but also ready to just chalk it up to learning if it'll be too many compromises... I probably need to gain almost 10mm but will measure later to confirm if there's a possible save.

Thanks in advance for any advice/ thoughts.

Chainstay clearance.jpg
 

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You can dimple after the frame is built, check out the pic at this link: VELOCIPEDE SALON

The best solution will probably be a combination of things, slightly dimple the chainstay as well as offset the chain line a couple mm and if needed drop a few teeth.
 

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Now that's what I call laying down some brass...

Yes, dimpling after build. Maybe add a spacer behind the drive-side bearing. Can you go compact (assuming this isn't already a compact)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah- on all of my practice joints, I wasn't laying down enough- I was almost trying to make them look like TIG joints. I heard over and over again that I needed more brass (and saw the same feedback numerous times for other newbs on the forums), so I think I went a little overboard :). If I'm able to save the frame, I'll be doing a lot of filing...

It's already a compact. Not sure I can get a spacer in, but I'll definitely be trying that and some dimpling using the method whydomylegshurt sent along.

Thanks boys- hope is rising.
 

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Like BungedUp said, here's what i had to do on TWO frames, and they weren't my first two! Always learning.
But I highly recommend you dimple it BEFORE you paint the frame. The powder or paint can get scuffed especially with such a low-tech device as seen below.
CS_post-crimper-tech.jpg
CS-dimple-outside-view.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Saved!

You guys rock- thanks. I followed something similar to what whydomylegshurt posted and it seemed to work out really well. I have millimeters of clearance, but the bike is built and rolling like a dream (of course, I now found out that I have some serious toe-overlap issues :madman:).

FWIW, a buddy of mine who has spent the last 25 years working in the metal and fabrication industries (he now makes custom, high-end furniture- almost all out of steel and various metals and wood) said that it's much better to work the metal hot- he recommended (after I'd already done this) to put my torch back on it and heat it up and tap it with a small ball pen hammer. He said there is much more control over the metal this way and it doesn't lose it's strength as much. Feel free to discuss.

The tools.

IMG_5094.jpg

The Method
IMG_5095.jpg IMG_5096.jpg


The result
IMG_5097.jpg IMG_5098.jpg IMG_5099.jpg


All built up
IMG_5111.jpg IMG_5115.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
HTA was supposed to be 71. Very possible it got pushed steeper a bit in the building process (and not the most precise jig in the world). FC was supposed to be 602. Again, if the HT got pushed forward, that would decrease the FC. I'll check both measurements tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow. Just checked. HA is nearly 74 and FC is 570- that would explain some things!
 
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