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Recovering Weight Weenie
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys... I have a buddy who's 6'8" lives in England and needs to buy a new commuter/off-roader. He almost bought a Trek 4300 but I'm trying to help him find a decent ride over there that has man-sized wheels.
Any leads?
I'm thinking of pushing him towards the Fisher Dual Sport 229....
Found one in a shop over there...

Can you U.K. folks help me out?
 

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Recovering couch patato
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His inseam better be 39" max if he wants to fit the XL Fishers, even with a longThomson seatpost. 20.8" seat tube...
I'm helping a European brand make a 24" seat tubed 29" bike to happen, for 6'5"-6'9" riders, I'd say, but it most probably won't come in time for your friend.
 

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Recovering Weight Weenie
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Discussion Starter #3
thanks Cloxxi
Would you say, though, that the Fisher would be a much better selection than the Trek?
The 4300 has only a 24.0" top tube while the Fisher is 25.5".
Are there any other options?
Oh yes.. where can I go to get the proper way to measure inseam?
Thanks for your help.

Cloxxki said:
His inseam better be 39" max if he wants to fit the XL Fishers, even with a longThomson seatpost. 20.8" seat tube...
I'm helping a European brand make a 24" seat tubed 29" bike to happen, for 6'5"-6'9" riders, I'd say, but it most probably won't come in time for your friend.
 

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Not a UK guy, but...

...maybe he can mail order, if that's okay with him, from the Netherlands or Germany the budget Nishiki TR-29 or K-29 which both come in 24" seat tube size. The TR should be priced in between that Trek and the 229, and the K closer to the 229. I am not sure how those Nishiki forks support someone 6'8", but you can actually get different springs and cartridges for them, as listed at www.nishiki.com/pdf/nishiki_attitude.pdf

Measure the inseam by standing without shoes against a wall with your feet slightly apart, and press a big and steady book along the wall up between the legs till the firm stop and mark the back of the book at the wall. Measure from the floor to the mark.
 

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Recovering couch patato
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Inseam is perhaps not the very most appropriate measurement. Another way to put it, it : how much seatpost extention (hear of saddle rail) will he need with a 20.8" seattube?
Inseam is measured by standing in the door opening (find one that fits you for prepore posture). Shove a book up your groin, and pencil mark how high it reaches. That's considered inseam. I have 995mm, just over 39", and 20.8" is pushing it with a 410mm seat post, it's actually over the max with 180mm cranks, FLite TT seat and Egg Beater Pedals. I could get a seat that's taller, or even longer cranks, but the latter is not the first choice plan with a Fisher frame.
In the year 2004, I cannot imagine agreeing a 6'8" is fitting his ANY stock bike correctly. For MTB, 630mm top tube should be the absolute dead minimum, 650mm closer to ideal. I say : most simple yet burly custom frame, 23" ST, 25.5" TT, 72/72º, basic parts, 36h strong rims, and your friend is go! If despite his 4" extra, he's got legs no longer than mine, than get him on that XL Fisher with long seatpost, and throw on a 120-130mm stem, you should be close to a perfect fit then.
Good luck!

J


Padre said:
thanks Cloxxi
Would you say, though, that the Fisher would be a much better selection than the Trek?
The 4300 has only a 24.0" top tube while the Fisher is 25.5".
Are there any other options?
Oh yes.. where can I go to get the proper way to measure inseam?
Thanks for your help.
 

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Recovering Weight Weenie
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Discussion Starter #6
That Nishiki looks like a great option.
Too bad I don't speak any European language besides the "kings english..."
otherwise I could read their website....
 

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Recovering couch patato
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Nishiki's geometries are top secret, they've invested so much in it... It's simple 71/73º angles as in 26", based on a 475mm fork (in reality often longer). So angles come out closer to 70.5/72.5º. Top tubes are notoriously short, head tubes long.
The 24" seems to have a 610mm actual TT length, which should translate into ~625mm effective. Head tube is 180mm. It may be tall enogh, but for I doubt it would be a well fitting trail bike. Ideal rides size is probably 6'3"-6'5", but then as a recreational bike, it won't perform any better than a 26" bike that does fit.
Dutch Nishiki racers get a size larger, put in short or even rigid forks, to find a bit of toptube and steeper angles. DH, it's a great bike, though.
 

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Recovering Weight Weenie
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Discussion Starter #8
I have a feeling it's going to be used for mostly commuting...

Cloxxki said:
Nishiki's geometries are top secret, they've invested so much in it... It's simple 71/73º angles as in 26", based on a 475mm fork (in reality often longer). So angles come out closer to 70.5/72.5º. Top tubes are notoriously short, head tubes long.
The 24" seems to have a 610mm actual TT length, which should translate into ~625mm effective. Head tube is 180mm. It may be tall enogh, but for I doubt it would be a well fitting trail bike. Ideal rides size is probably 6'3"-6'5", but then as a recreational bike, it won't perform any better than a 26" bike that does fit.
Dutch Nishiki racers get a size larger, put in short or even rigid forks, to find a bit of toptube and steeper angles. DH, it's a great bike, though.
 

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Recovering couch patato
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Nishiki 22" (permitting inseam), 110mm riser stem and a drop bar :)

Or the Nishiki 24", some saddle setback, 130mm stem and low riser bar, that might actually be a very comfortable and well-fitting ride if he's in not too much of a hurry. 2.35" Schwalbe slicks, of course. KM fork for peace of mind.
 

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All depends on measurements. I am 6'6" with a 40" Inseam. I manage fine with a long Thompson in a 22" Custom steel frame. Due to my long legs and short body I have a short toptube.

I think the XL Fisher would be a nice option but one factor to concider is that commuting in the UK is a harsh environment for bikes. Something tough and cheap without shiney things to attract thiefs is a good start.

Vibramiside who posts here uses a Fixed Surley CrossCheck fixed with the brakes set up european style to put off the thiefs. Something like this with flats and touring tyres would be ideal. And a 58cm frame with a flat bar and a long post is a nice size for a tall guy.

P::..
 

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Yeah the cross check is great I run mine without gears and I think I built it up for about £500 with the use of some old bits.

It's nice cos you can fit big rubber in and use it off road I used mine exclusively from the end of feb till about a month a go for all my riding and really enjoyed it.

I
 
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