Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ever since my ride on a Dialled Alpine (140mm Fox RLC 15QR) this past summer, I've been researching AM hardtails.

Seems like the Transition TransAM is a similar bike built by a local company.

My only complaint of the Alpine setup was the 140mm fork made steep climbs rather wandery. I think in the SoCal trails, it's a good trade-off for their many downhill "bombing" runs.

Our local trails tend to be more rain forest single track. Lots of roots and rocks. Wet at that. So our speeds tend to be down. Now of course, if DH is your thing, I'm sure you can string some routes to take advantage of that. But I just like the usuals: Tolt, Paradise, Black Diamond sort of trails. I get out to Tiger mountain now and then to get my bumpy downhill runs in. But I tend to avoid the jump portions of Tokul W, E, Duthie.

Can I get some riding impressions from local TransAM owners and their bike setups?

My thought is possibly running a 120mm fork on an AM hardtail to focus more on the single track portions of the trails. But I've been "advised" to stick with the 140mm as that's THE setup.

Also, anyone ride eastside trails willing to maybe meet up, go for a ride, swap bikes for a couple sections (I'm 5'-7" and ride a M Rush and S Monocog)?
 

·
Monkey Wrench
Joined
·
353 Posts
Also check out the Evil Sovereign. It is a beefy light cromoly frame from an even more 'local' company based in Seattle instead of Ferndale. Both frames are built in Taiwan, both handle SS or geared setups, and both have a generous range of geometry based on your fork setup. The Sovereign is built for a 140mm fork, so it would balance very nicely to your existing parts mix. Available now from your local Issaquah bike shop... =)
 

·
Justin Vander Pol
Joined
·
1,671 Posts
I haven't ridden an Alpine, but looking at the numbers I'd say it'll have the same basic feel as the Alpine. The TransAm is 1 lb heavier, same head angle, and a lower BB.

Sounds like you want an xc race type geometry, rather than the newer "do all" geometry. I have a feeling you'd learn to like these bikes, it takes some adjusting on climbs, like skooching forward on the seat.

Get an adjustable fork like a Pike U-turn and then you can have it both ways. If you like tight geometry, 120mm is the way to go, but be warned the the TransAm is a very low bike, and will be even lower at 120. The lowness is why a lot of us like the TA, it just rails the corners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I've never had so many pedal strikes as when I first got my Rush. That too is slack HA and low BB.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
juice said:
I haven't ridden an Alpine, but looking at the numbers I'd say it'll have the same basic feel as the Alpine. The TransAm is 1 lb heavier, same head angle, and a lower BB.

Sounds like you want an xc race type geometry, rather than the newer "do all" geometry. I have a feeling you'd learn to like these bikes, it takes some adjusting on climbs, like skooching forward on the seat.

Get an adjustable fork like a Pike U-turn and then you can have it both ways. If you like tight geometry, 120mm is the way to go, but be warned the the TransAm is a very low bike, and will be even lower at 120. The lowness is why a lot of us like the TA, it just rails the corners.
I guess I'm slowly adjusting to new school hardtails.

To me, XC race geo means 71.5* HA (unsagged) with 80mm fork with a 110mm stem.

I'm warming up to the "do everything" bike, but right now, the numbers and relative feel seems to be heavily leaning to the downhill part of the "all mountain" scale. And while I do ride that, I gravitate to more of the XC side of the scale...for now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
vwvoodoo said:
Also check out the Evil Sovereign. It is a beefy light cromoly frame from an even more 'local' company based in Seattle instead of Ferndale. Both frames are built in Taiwan, both handle SS or geared setups, and both have a generous range of geometry based on your fork setup. The Sovereign is built for a 140mm fork, so it would balance very nicely to your existing parts mix. Available now from your local Issaquah bike shop... =)
Would my local Issaquah bike shop have demo bike built up to try out?? :thumbsup:

Also, any info on pricing and availability?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,746 Posts
Traffic, unless you plan on racing this thing, a, "too slack" set up may work just fine for a quiver of one. Especialy with an adjustable fork. Better too slack than not slack enough and another endo I say...

I'm too lazy to bother comparing with the Covert geometry I have been on for 2 seasons now but I do love that bike for everything from the shore to long XC days in the saddle. Transition has always been helpful when I asked questions too. If I could talk the boss into an AM HT to add to the garage stock, I'd be all over the TransAm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,469 Posts
Yo Paul (?)
I think connecting at Duthie with Juice and I (or whoever else owns a transam) woudl be ideal for test rides. This weekend is out for me, and I'm not sure my thursday night ride would work well for a test ride opportunity. Maybe next week? We can coordinate off-line.

Slacker head tube angle will only help you (or anybody!) enjoy the steeper/ more tech FR stuff more, regardless of skill level. The obvious answer is to pick up a fork with adjustable travel, so you can have your cake and eat it too! I have both a Talas 32 150, and a Talas 36, and to be honest I much prefer the Talas 32 150 with the 15mm axle. The reason being, it's a shorter overall length for the similar amount of travel. If you are under 200lbs it's plenty stiff. 150 for steep descents and 130 for flat tech stuff, you'll have your bases covered geometry wise.

I think you should ride my Curtlo, but really it's just a lighter hand-made gucci transam with a few extra features. The extra $250 and 9 month wait is probably not worth it for most. (don't get me wrong, I couldn't be happier now that I have mine!) The geometry is very very close though. I rode a transam last week and... it felt pretty much like my curtlo.
 

·
Monkey Wrench
Joined
·
353 Posts
Actually, we're working on getting a couple of Sovereign demos. We demo lots of our other mountain products, so it would be fitting for us to have Sovereigns.

The frame price is $799, and you can check it out (until we have our demos) here
I hope to have mine built in the next couple of weeks in a size medium.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So I just came back from a night ride at Tokul E.

What a hoot. Lots of fun. Great conditions. Well, there was frost forming. The ground made some interesting sounds as we did the flowy section in the clear cut area under the moonlight. Ha, all the rigid monocog-ing at night helped ride by feel. Good thing I had the full susser...

Well, did Flowtron on the way out. I have to say, that was about the first time I felt like I could use a little more slack HA. ;-) Not being able to see what's just after the G-out made things...interesting. I bit it on the small log drop just before the bigger drop later. Eh,...just dropped a knee down.

Some of the other sections ahead had a similar feel. Without being able to see up ahead, just had to tackle things as they come rather than being able to plan ahead on where you can let go and where you need to check your speed.

Ok, I give. Will start looking for a 140mm fork.
 

·
Moist and Delicious
Joined
·
555 Posts
Yay for the flowy section in the clearcut. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks to Scott and others that answered my miriads of questions. There is more to come!! LOL.

I just pulled the trigger on a 17" Dialled Prince Albert in grey.
http://www.dialledbikes.com/products/mtb/prince-albert.php

Now to look for a fork. Preferable a Fox 32 RLC (float?). But obviously price will affect my final decision since I still need to get other parts, wheels, and a still buy quality milk for the kids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,746 Posts
Hmmm, another bike company I've never heard of.

Why and English company instead of a local one? Interesting choice.

And, maybe it's just me. But, I'll never buy another bike without replaceable drop outs. Unless it's a SS of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Probably because I've ridden a Dialled bike and haven't ridden a "local" bike. Not to mention the cost difference is significant. It's more XC biased and about a pound lighter.

Besides, if I can stick with good parts on the bike, the frame can be replaced with somethng local...maybe some custom.

I've never broken a derailuer tab on my aluminum bikes. What do I need one for? It's steel, can just bend back or reweld.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,469 Posts
Dialled bikes is a solid choice. I spoke with them a ton and nearly pulled the trigger on an alpine before ordering my Curtlo, they were very helpful and the prices are great.

The Brits have been sourcing burly hardtails via taiwan/china for years. This time last year, your stock burly hardtail options were almost entirely british, or chromag.

Steel hangers work great, especially when they are like 3/8" thick :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,746 Posts
traffic002 said:
Probably because I've ridden a Dialled bike and haven't ridden a "local" bike. Not to mention the cost difference is significant. It's more XC biased and about a pound lighter.

Besides, if I can stick with good parts on the bike, the frame can be replaced with somethng local...maybe some custom.

I've never broken a derailuer tab on my aluminum bikes. What do I need one for? It's steel, can just bend back or reweld.
Good point. Though I would think the post buy support concern may be there. They may have a great track record though. Don't know.

Usually, the frame is the last thing you'd want to replace. Building the bike around the frame, not the parts hanging on it. Or, at least that's my take on that.

Broken and bent tabs: I guess you are a lot luckier than me then. I mangled a lot of early Specialized M2 and Stumpy frames and went through 2-3 derailleurs a year on my Santa Cruz Superlight before moving to replaceable hangers. Thick hangers just mean more money in new derailleurs from this side of the saddle.... :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I try to look for opportunities to support local.

In this case, it just didn't pan out. I'd like to get up and running. And with many frames being so close in terms of build quality and performance, it did come down to how much money I had left in my pocket to buy a nice for or a nice wheel.

I did try to find a frame from a reputable builder with a history of customer support.

In terms of replacing the frame. I'm finding that my "frame" isn't always the end all. But with good components, I can ride a "new bike" by just swapping a frame. Even going FS...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
FM said:
That is such a loaded topic... what exactly is local? Locally owned/designed/fabricated/sourced/sold/maintained/environmentally impacted? Slow Food is an interesting concept.

There's always other great ways to support the locals, if your bike of choice comes from somewhere else.;)
I'm already there!:thumbsup:
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top