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Hi all,
Just as the title says. Everytime I move my seat up or down, I always think it doesn't look stright, the nose of the seat always looks like it's off the either side, not much but when I ride' I'm always thinking my seat is a little crooked. My question it that are ther any cyclist's secrets to make sure your seat is straight on the bike? There has got to be a way other than doing it by eye.

Thanks in advance,
Steve
 

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I take it to a shop that specializes in computer-controlled, laser alignments. I get my seat and stem/fork done at the same time to save a few bucks.


































No, not really.

The secret is ..... make sure you're not cross-eyed.
 

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That's one of the things I hate the most, that and the handlebars. I never feel like either are perfectly straight. I just eyeball, but then tend to "feel" that it's croocked while I'm riding. I've gotten used to it since I've had to load the bike into the back of my Xterra for transport, but now I just take off both wheels leave the seat alone.

BM
 

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yea...handle bars

bmadau said:
That's one of the things I hate the most, that and the handlebars. I never feel like either are perfectly straight. I just eyeball, but then tend to "feel" that it's croocked while I'm riding. I've gotten used to it since I've had to load the bike into the back of my Xterra for transport, but now I just take off both wheels leave the seat alone.

BM
I never get my handle bars right the first time.
The seat has never been a problem. Just I-ball the length of the top tube.

michael
 

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Tell you what... My old seat had a bent seat rail. I couldn't feel it while riding but it always looked weird. I couldn't figure it out till I bought a new seat and was holding the old one in my hand. I could never seem to get the damn thing lined up with my frame. Now with my new seat it lines up easy...
 

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No, that's not phonetic
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Kneel down behind the bike and look under the saddle, over the top of the seatpost, forward towards the stem. You should be able to see the headset cap atop the stem through ahead of you between the saddle rails, and the nose of the saddle. If the saddle is straight, everything will be symmetrical and the nose of the saddle will line up with the bolt in the headset cap.

To check the bars, roll the front wheel perpendicular against a wall, straddle the rear wheel and push against the back of the saddle with your stomach. This will hold the bike upright and hold everything steady and leave your hands free. Look down and make sure that the frame and front wheel are perfectly lined up (look at the front wheel, and notice if the wheel sticks out more on one side of the top and downtube on one side or the other). Holding the bike in place with your legs around the rear wheel and your hips against the back of the saddle, ake a tape measure and determine the distance from the nose of the saddle to the end of one handlebar end, and then the other. Compare the two measurements, and adjust the stem until they match.
 

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For seats/stems/etc...I usually pick 2 vantage points and line it up relative to those. On a seat, it would be the center of the rear tire and the top tube. I've never had it be more than very slightly (my butt can't tell) incorrect. On the other hand, I'm not picky.
 

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I think you can do a good job using your eye. See pic below. Align the seatpost exactly in the middle of the top tube and then check the seat nose against the other end of the top tube. Notice in my picture, the seatpost is a fuzz off to the right side and thus the saddle looks off slightly to the right side. The problem is my cheap camera viewfinder has a terrible pallalax error with my aperature so I have to guess the corrective angle. :madman:

For the other guys, here's the secret to adjusting your bars. See pic below. Just use a straight edge against your fork legs and look down over the bars. You can look ahead or behind the bars, but behind tends to be less busy with cables, decals, etc so that's how I usually do it. Make sure the straight edge is relatively parallel to the ground and then roll the bike backwards until the spokes just barely start to pinch it to hold it in place. Then you can use both hands up at the handlebars to do your adjustment.
 

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steiny said:
I think you can do a good job using your eye. See pic below. Align the seatpost exactly in the middle of the top tube and then check the seat nose against the other end of the top tube. Notice in my picture, the seatpost is a fuzz off to the right side and thus the saddle looks off slightly to the right side. The problem is my cheap camera viewfinder has a terrible pallalax error with my aperature so I have to guess the corrective angle. :madman:

For the other guys, here's the secret to adjusting your bars. See pic below. Just use a straight edge against your fork legs and look down over the bars. You can look ahead or behind the bars, but behind tends to be less busy with cables, decals, etc so that's how I usually do it. Make sure the straight edge is relatively parallel to the ground and then roll the bike backwards until the spokes just barely start to pinch it to hold it in place. Then you can use both hands up at the handlebars to do your adjustment.
Is it just me, or is steiny's handlebar about a degree off to the left?
 

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Nat said:
Is it just me, or is steiny's handlebar about a degree off to the left?
Actually, the bars are a bit off to the right. With my stupid camera, I had trouble getting a shot straight over the top of the stem/tire. What you want to look at in the picture is the relationship between the bars and the ends of the straight edge. There's slightly more straight edge covered up on the right than the left. I would adjust it but I'm taking the stem and bars off next week anyway so I don't want to mess with it.
 

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I think seat aligning techniques have been covered pretty thoroughly, but to make sure my bars are straight I run a builders “L-Square” up against the bars and stem, with the longer end pointing out over the front tire. Looking along the edge, adjust the bars until everything lines up. Perfect every time. ;)

Dave.
 
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