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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So in efforts of being better prepared for next year's Whiskey 50...

Any decent products out there to waterproof clothing, gloves, shoes, etc? I recall when I was a kid we used to use Scotchgard to help waterproof things like ski gloves it it was going to be really warm and wet but I don't so much recall how well it worked.

Thought it may be prudent to buy something like Scotchgard or Nik's and have it available to treat gloves or a shell or something when facing a very wet ride.

Thanks!
 

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also neopryne (wetsuit material) is good stuff... I used to have neopryne socks when I biked in West Virginia.. my feet always got wet there... neopryne surronded by simply waterproof jacket and pants... with neopryne gloves and socks and hat..
 

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Got a suspension fork
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Brian,

While I've not got personal experience with neoprene I'll plug my awesome Wool socks, I wear two pairs of wool socks year round and they rock! They keep the water off your skin better than cotton. I wore my shorty wool socks and on top of them my knee high wool socks on this years whiskey, and my feet were only a tiny bit cold ever on the ride. Oddly, I don't overheat in summer while I'd think it would be roasting with two pair of wool, but it's really not.

Another nicety is that wool doesn't retain odor. Your riding socks never stink when you ride with wool.

I can highly recommend both Smartwool and DeFeet wool socks.
 

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I like the nixwax line for waterproofing. It doesn't clog the pores on breathable fabric like a spray silicone ie campdry etc. I am also a huge fan of my defeet woolie bollies for year round use.
 

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The tech wash first to clean out the clothing and the TX wash in to fully waterproof the garments again. You probably don't need both but I like to be thorough. On shoes, gloves etc I use the TX direct spray on and will spot wash with the tech wash if needed.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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You'd be surprised how warm you can keep your core without excessive clothing if you can just keep your hands and feet warm though.

I'm one of those guys who's circulation just stops to the fingers in any kind of mild cold. My palms will often be sweating, but my fingers freezing cold. To that extent, I've come up with "systems" that allow me to defeat the cold. I'll use adhesive foot-warmers and put them on my handlebar, so I'm "holding" them at the same time within my pogies...super toasty. I'll also stash a pair of loose mittens where I'll throw in handwarmer packets, because then I have 150° dry mittens ready when I really need, which has worked out like magic. Having done this for a while now, I just don't take chances in the sense that I'm not going to dress short of what is necessary. You can still manage this without excessive layers. Pogies, thin gloveliners, maybe a long-sleeve base layer and short-sleeved jersey, capped off with a stowable shell. That way I have coverage, but if I take off the shell it doesn't really feel like I'm wearing too much. My body would make plenty of heat like that with my extremities taken care of. Any more insulation up top and I'd be crazy overheating while riding, although I'd likely be freezing if just standing around. Lake boots no brainer, some way to keep my feet dry like light snow gaiters or just taping off my pants. Stretchy craft pants are pretty good at dealing with weather, but are also probably going to be a primary way of moving heat away from the body during hard efforts, as they become somewhat soaked by the rain. I'd go with a light balaclava and my taped up snow-board helmet (no vents). You can also pull the balaclava over the mouth if you get hot, or pull it away. Easy to stash too. If I dressed like this I'd be able to do things like throw off the gloveliners and just let them roll around loose in the pogies. Won't hurt nuthin. If you start getting real hot, you can take your hands out of them and place them on the bar, but they really are THAT weatherproof that it makes them worth the over-heating in terms of how they keep your hands from suffering in the cold. Shell would be easy to stash. Feet would stay dry as long as I didn't put a food down in a deep stream or something.

Lastly, the Osprey packs have their plusses AND minuses, but the pull-out rain cover is definitely one of the awesome features, and it works.

I don't think you are going to stay dry, it's more about being comfortable and warm. Trying too hard to stay dry will cause the sweat to make you wet due to lack of breathability.
 

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bland
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Go to frys. Buy a bags worth of fruit (nutrition) a bags worth of red bull (energy) and a bottle of makers mark double bagged (warmth.) You now have everything you need for the race and 4 plastic bags you can put over your feet and hands before you put on your shoes and gloves (free waterproofing!!!)
 

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Got a suspension fork
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Waterproof gear is the clearly the better choice. But for me, I rarely ride in rain living here in the desert, so would prefer to have an option to help waterproofing my shell and gloves if needed.
 
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