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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys,
I'm thinking about building another set of wheels (my 3rd ever) and considering carbon asymetric rims and I see a lot of rims have angled spoke holes as an option, my first two builds were run-of-the-mill aluminum rims.
I think I can see the benefit of angled spoke holes but wondering if the nipple seats are molded/finished so the nipples sit squarely in the rim bed or if the angle is so small as to not make a difference?
I'm still just researching rims and would be using non-boost hubs with about 27-30mm IW 29" rims.
Thanks for any help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know, a pic would help. On a normal rim with straight-drilled holes the nipple sits squarely on the rim bed, being supported evenly.
I haven't built (or even seen one in person) but on a rim with angled spoke holes, i would 'ass'ume the nipple no longer sits squarely on the rim bed, is it so little of a difference it doesn't matter?
 

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mtbpete
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I would say that many if not most higher end alloy and carbon rims have spoke holes angled toward the side of the hub that the spoke will lace to. This is a good thing. Just make sure to lace the spokes such that they follow the angle toward the correct side of the hub. If the spoke gets laced the opposite direction of the angle then stress will be put spoke at the nipple area and it will fatigue quicker at that area.
 

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You want the angled holes, the first set of carbon wheels I built a while back had straight drilled holes and you could see the bend it put on the spokes right out of the nipples, it was still a decent set of wheels and it never caused a problem but since then I have made sure they were angle drilled and it eliminates that issue.
 

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There's definitely a difference if you assemble them right or wrong. Given that the spokes go alternate to each hub flange, you'll notice very quick if you started assembling wrong.

And if you build right, there's nothing to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all, appreciate the input.
 
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