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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read all the great posts and the FAQs and been to lots of the popular sites and i've got the singleator, a spot chainring and bashguard, and a friend who has a tool for removing the rear cogs off my 1996 fisher mt tam aluminum hardtail chrome . . . is the 16 tooth cog in the back that i have going to okay, or do i have to worry about the ramps? is setting up the singleator easy enough (the directions make i seem so.) is there ANY chance i won't need to use the singleator? (of course i have vertical or semi-vert dropouts, not horizontal.) also my LBS tells me they have a 23 and 3/4 inch alloy riser called the "dimension" that sells for $16 . . . has anyone heard of this handlebar? i know i'll want something wider than the flat bar i'm currently running and i can't really say weight is an issue (it is, but cost is much more of an issue.) am i likely to need a new chain, or should just cutting the slack out of my current one work? i know lots of guys have experience with the conversion so if there are any secrets or hidden mishaps i might avoid, i'd love to hear about it . . . everything posted on this discussion board (and that at dirt rag and nemba) has been great and helpful, can't wait to get back to the trails! (my rear derailleur basically blowing up at Pedro's fest made me decided it was time to make the SS switch . . . plus hoping to purchase a fisher 29er next year!) . . . thanks in advance, peace
 

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A few tips....

Q1. is the 16 tooth cog in the back that i have going to okay, or do i have to worry about the ramps?

A1. It is usable, but the ramps will tend to unhook the chain when pressure is applied. Try to get a non ramped gear at your LBS for a few dollars from their parts bin.

Q2. is setting up the singleator easy enough (the directions make i seem so.) is there ANY chance i won't need to use the singleator? (of course i have vertical or semi-vert dropouts, not horizontal.)

A2. Setting up a singleator is pretty straight forward. Use the upward position for a tad more tension. If you can find the right combination of front chain ring and rear cog, you might be able to get away with out a singleator. Measure the chain stay and find one of the popular gear inch charts. The info on the gear inch website will help to clue you in on usable combos.

Q3. my LBS tells me they have a 23 and 3/4 inch alloy riser called the "dimension" that sells for $16 . . . has anyone heard of this handlebar? i know i'll want something wider than the flat bar i'm currently running and i can't really say weight is an issue (it is, but cost is much more of an issue.)

A3. Never heard of that brand, but that doesn't mean it would not work. You might like the mechanical advantage of a wider handlebar. When torqing up a hill, a wilder bar offers an advantage. Riser bars also help in heeping an upright riding position. This may make you more comfortible on your present bike. Flat bars are fine until you are ready to make a larger investment, or get more creative in building your next bike. Use what you have until it breaks. Check Ebay or MTBR ads for a decently priced bar.

Q4. am i likely to need a new chain, or should just cutting the slack out of my current one work?

A4. Depends on the wear of your current chain. It is best to change your front chain ring, rear cog and chain at the same time if all three components are worn out. Letting one of the three go for too long will affect the life span of the other two. I usually change out the chain every 500 to 1000 miles or sooner depending on the type of riding or the stretch factor. If the chain stretches too much, it can prematurely wear out the gears. Chains are cheaper that gears most of the time. Cutting out the slack of your current chain if it is in good running order would be fine. You will know when the chain is stretched too far. You will start to slip on a gear.

Q5. i know lots of guys have experience with the conversion so if there are any secrets or hidden mishaps i might avoid, i'd love to hear about it

A5. Read the FAQ area of this board. The authors did a fantastic job assembling information and the conversion will be pretty easy. My only secret would be chain line. If it is off, the chain will have a tendency to slip off. This will probably frustrate you to a very high level and discouragement will set in. Take the time to make sure everything is lined up correctly. If in doubt, buy someone who knows what they are doing a few brews and see if they will help you out.

Best of luck on your conversion. Please excuse me if I messed up on any of the questions, maybe someone can correct me if I am wrong or provide additional insight.

-JS-
 

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i second avoiding the ramped ring in the back....

i haven't had any problems with my ramped front ring, but was ejected from my bike a couple times when the chain slipped off the back ramped cog.

shimano DX cogs are cheap and about as good as it gets for the back (performance-wise).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the great advice

SS Jerry, thanks for taking the time with all the good advice and thanks to Max a Mill for the recommendations also. I've gotten this far: removed my big ring, loosened my middle and granny, took off my rear derailleur and chain, and put the singleator in place. smashed my hand trying to take the cogs off my rear wheel, cracked a fingernail, little bit of blood. Vise grip plus pliers plus chain whip braced against legs and chest does not work in my house. bought a ratchet set (we were at home depot and it seemed like a good excuse) and the appropriate size can't get itself into the nut inside the littlest cog. i imagine my LBS has a tool for this and i will stop in tomorrow and ask for advice or to borrow it or if he can just pull it apart. on my cranks i took out the bolt that i THOUGHT was holding the crank to the frame, no dice. it just stayed as solid as ever. question number two for LBS.
but just for fun i put my spot chainring and bashguard on the crank while the middle and granny were hanging around the bottom bracket area and it looked great. singleator looks nice and clean too. i'm just waiting to cut all the cables and remove the derailleurs and shifters for as long and late as i can, that will be a nice feeling. then i can't wait to post about the first ride!! thanks again.
 

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lenox_mtbr said:
SS Jerry, thanks for taking the time with all the good advice and thanks to Max a Mill for the recommendations also. I've gotten this far: removed my big ring, loosened my middle and granny, took off my rear derailleur and chain, and put the singleator in place. smashed my hand trying to take the cogs off my rear wheel, cracked a fingernail, little bit of blood. Vise grip plus pliers plus chain whip braced against legs and chest does not work in my house. bought a ratchet set (we were at home depot and it seemed like a good excuse) and the appropriate size can't get itself into the nut inside the littlest cog. i imagine my LBS has a tool for this and i will stop in tomorrow and ask for advice or to borrow it or if he can just pull it apart. on my cranks i took out the bolt that i THOUGHT was holding the crank to the frame, no dice. it just stayed as solid as ever. question number two for LBS.
but just for fun i put my spot chainring and bashguard on the crank while the middle and granny were hanging around the bottom bracket area and it looked great. singleator looks nice and clean too. i'm just waiting to cut all the cables and remove the derailleurs and shifters for as long and late as i can, that will be a nice feeling. then i can't wait to post about the first ride!! thanks again.
There is no substitute for using the right tools for the job. Go to the lbs and drop a couple of twenties on a lockring remover for the rear cassette, a crank puller for the cranks, and if you have a couple bucks leftover, a crank bolt tool. Even at full lbs price, they're worth their weight in fingernails.
 

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you might wanna consider a cheapo starter tool kit such as:

http://www.supergo.com/profile.cfm?LPROD_ID=8751&lsubcat_id=7573&lcat_id=7604&referpage=

i got this set and while the tools are by no means high quality they'll do most of the sh!t your gonna need!

as you brake em, replace them with the park equivalent tool.

most of my tools from my kit still work fine though. the only early casualty has been the chain tool and that was mostly my fault....
 
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